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Old 08-18-2012, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
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back in the day, one would see three crosses along the interstates. Two small blue ones and a larger yellow one.
Some of these are are still standing. Although I once saw them in NY and NY other than that, I knew I was in the south.
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Old 08-18-2012, 05:04 PM
 
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More about Kudzu http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kudzu_in_the_United_States


I've always noticed that throughout Virginia, houses and buildings in the middle of towns and small cities always have yards and grass and trees around them.

By contrast, as soon as you cross the Potomac River into western Maryland and Pennsylvania, even in very small towns, you will see blocks of row-houses right on the sidewalk, with little or no yards or grass.

Also, it's amusing how many streets, roads, schools, and parks in Washington DC are named for Civil War Union generals and cabinet members.

Then just one mile away in Arlington, VA, many streets, roads, schools, and parks are named for Confederate generals. Most of the residents there today are either transplants from northern states, or immigrants from developing countries, and could care less about the meaning of the names.
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Old 08-18-2012, 05:15 PM
 
Location: Lincoln, NE (via SW Virginia)
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From the north...once you get beyond nova the contrast is STARK.... It gets very southern very fast. Virginia has a very vocal very active chapter of sons of confederate vets. A close buddy of mine and I used to do a road trip from Philadelphia area back home into Virginia every year and each year once we got near culpepper we say the SCV marching with their rebel flags. Kinda felt good in a weird way to see that because its visual reassurance that I'm back home. Nova doesn't even feel like Virginia anymore...so I would be very hesitant to call it the south but equally firm in Virginia's southern ness beyond dc/nova.

From the west I think it feels southern once you hit either east Texas, Arkansas, or the more rural spots in KY. Western ky has never felt southern to me. But which point you enter from obviously is dictated by where you're coming from. I think the kudzu line is a pretty good indicator...I would just clip off Virginia's top 7 counties.
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Old 08-18-2012, 05:43 PM
 
Location: PG County, MD
582 posts, read 776,189 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowlane3 View Post
More about Kudzu Kudzu in the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


I've always noticed that throughout Virginia, houses and buildings in the middle of towns and small cities always have yards and grass and trees around them.

By contrast, as soon as you cross the Potomac River into western Maryland and Pennsylvania, even in very small towns, you will see blocks of row-houses right on the sidewalk, with little or no yards or grass.
Agreed, The rest of Maryland is more like Virginia in that sense, but I definitely recall Western Maryland being how you describe. Though I would tend to group Western Maryland with West Virginia over Pennsylvania in most respects.
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Old 08-18-2012, 05:48 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
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Originally Posted by NCN View Post
If you are on I-95, Fredericksburg, Virginia will start showing Civil War battlegrounds. I think that would be a clue. But on second thought, I am sure the North has these also, just different colored uniforms.

Do you have Krispy Kreme doughnuts in the Northern states? Cheerwine soft drinks would be another clue. They are red and they are good. I believe there is a Harris Teeter Grocery Store in D. C. I have been shopping at Harris Teeter for about 45 years or longer. Bojangles, Chick-Fil-A, Hardee's would be fast food places. I am sure there are more.

Then sweet tea and gravy biscuits, chicken fried steak, and both corn bread and biscuits served with the meals. We are getting more businesses from the North and they never give enough bread with their meals.

Does the North have plantation houses?

I am having a hard time answering this because I haven't been much past D. C. if at all.

Probably the biggest clue will be the difference in food. I made the mistake of asking for a sausage biscuit in a restaurant in Ohio. They didn't know what I was talking about. I looked at their menu, ordered a couple of biscuits and a couple of sausage patties, cut the bread open and put the meat in and told the waitress, "This is a sausage biscuit." LOL We put everything in biscuits down here.

This is a little more rare these days because the "guys" word has made its appearance already, but when someone says "Y'all," you are here.
Fast food burger chains usually have sausage biscuits on their breakfast menus, so I have no idea how she didn't know what it was. I wouldn't say it's exclusive to the south.
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Old 08-18-2012, 06:13 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
Fast food burger chains usually have sausage biscuits on their breakfast menus, so I have no idea how she didn't know what it was. I wouldn't say it's exclusive to the south.
People outside of the South love to claim ignorance about such things, being terrified that someone will mistake them as southern. Never heard of a sausage biscuit? In Indonesia maybe, but not Ohio...

My favorite is people who don't understand sweet tea (in my experience we just call it "tea" in the South). It's tea that is sweetened when it's warm, and has nothing to do with the amount of sugar that's in it...you can add as much or as little as you want. What's hard to understand about that?
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Old 08-18-2012, 06:15 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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You know you're in the south when you can no longer drive more than a mile or two without seeing a little country store, a church, and a gentleman farmer mowing an acre of lawn on a lawn tractor, but no real farms. "Urban sprawl" in the south meant along the sides of the main highway to the next town.
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Old 08-18-2012, 06:23 PM
 
6,611 posts, read 6,922,270 times
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Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
You know you're in the south when you can no longer drive more than a mile or two without seeing a little country store, a church, and a gentleman farmer mowing an acre of lawn on a lawn tractor, but no real farms. "Urban sprawl" in the south meant along the sides of the main highway to the next town.
I don't know that I've ever seen a little country store from the highway...
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Old 08-18-2012, 06:26 PM
Status: "could've~would've~should've used 'have', not 'of'" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
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Kudzu, red dirt and loblollies.
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Old 08-18-2012, 06:28 PM
 
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I feel sorry for southerners. They have yankees, hispanics and asians invading them. No wonder they are scared about losing their local culture.

They created some amazing scenery in places like Charleston, Richmond, Savannah and probably others I can't think of right now.
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