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Old 08-19-2012, 05:09 PM
 
Location: PG County, MD
582 posts, read 778,727 times
Reputation: 353

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
Not me. My son was stationed at Patuxent River and I loved going to visit him. Such beautiful farms and country sides with the extra lanes for the horse and carriage.
It's always nice to hear that someone visited my part of the state. I love it here and it just saddens me when so many folks, even from my own state, have never been down here. It's the oldest and most traditional part of Maryland and it's great to hear that someone has an appreciation for this area.
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Old 08-19-2012, 05:21 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,919,033 times
Reputation: 23222
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
You know you're in the south when you can no longer drive more than a mile or two without seeing a little country store, a church, and a gentleman farmer mowing an acre of lawn on a lawn tractor, but no real farms. "Urban sprawl" in the south meant along the sides of the main highway to the next town.
We drove from Union County to New Bern taking the back roads. There are so many churches along the route we took. We mentioned that maybe we should have counted how many churches we saw along the road. We used to count cows and horses. I am thinking it is a white horse that was worth 20 points when I was a child. Oh, the memories.

We are getting ready to drive more than 1000 miles to visit New England. Ohio and the DC area are about as far north as I have ever been. I am so excited and a little nervous about driving in that direction. We are taking I-81. Don't want to be specific about the date, but we will hopefully end up near the Canadian border. Maybe I will come back and let you know what is different from what I see on a daily basis. I find it interesting that in a short time we will pass through West Virginia and Maryland. It will take us at least 3 hours to get from where we live in North Carolina to Virginia. Our first night will be in Culpeper with relatives. I think that once we get settled in the condo we could make a trip over to Maine and pass through a couple more states I have never been in.

Charlotte has become so big that it is hard to find a place I feel is bigger than the area we live in. I live in the country, but we go into Charlotte often for medical and social get-togethers. We have one scheduled next week. I like living 25 miles outside of Charlotte though. The county we are visiting had the same population in 1840 as the county we live in now. Our county is about 8 times the population of that county now. Our area is one of the fastest growing areas in the United States. I hope it is slowing down a little now, but I doubt it. Houses do not remain on sale very long at all until they are occupied again.
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Old 08-19-2012, 05:47 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,919,033 times
Reputation: 23222
Coming from the West on I-40 is a little harder to pinpoint. Shawnee, Oklahoma is the area I identify as making me feel at home. We sat through an entire meal at a fast food place there listening to the people behind us talk about horses and pot-bellied pigs. I loved it.

On I-20 I would say the Mississippi River was the dividing line. I know Texas is Southern, but the terrain is so different from most of the South that is seems more like the West. When you get to a place going West that you can see miles and miles with no trees, that seems like the West too. I felt like I was far away from home until I woke up from our first night with the big sky and looked across at a shopping area and spotted a Lowe's Hardware. Lowe's is home for me. Our ancestors are on the same page on the 1790 Wilkes County census.

I-10 is a wonder. Southern, yes, but not what we see on a daily basis. It has so many bridges. I felt like the area near New Orleans had an identity all its own. Heading north into Alabama and crossing into the Eastern time zone was a good place to call Southern. Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana and Eastern Texas seem more like tourist areas. They were places to visit. I wouldn't want to live there, but I know many people like their lives there. I think they are more of a Gulf Coast area.

So you won't get mad at me, I wouldn't want to live too near the ocean in Eastern North Carolina either. I enjoy visiting, but need more solid ground under my feet.
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Old 08-20-2012, 05:39 AM
 
Location: Lafayette, La
2,038 posts, read 4,563,526 times
Reputation: 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tezcatlipoca View Post
Imagine how we feel in places where people don't seem to think we exist. Much of Maryland is fully southern and most of the rest has hints of southerness, but overall the heavily transplanted, populated, and mostly non-southern center of the state dominates the state image so much that people forget the rest of the state is any different. Most conceptions of Maryland seem to be from folks who never left I-95.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tezcatlipoca View Post
It's always nice to hear that someone visited my part of the state. I love it here and it just saddens me when so many folks, even from my own state, have never been down here. It's the oldest and most traditional part of Maryland and it's great to hear that someone has an appreciation for this area.
My Uncle has a place in Bushwood (St Marys County in Maryland near Leonardtown) and that area is by far my favorite place in Maryland. The maritime environment, the amish people living in the area, and the old colonial charm of the place is amazing. I'm actually happy living down here in Louisiana, but if I had to choose another spot to live, it wouldn't be far from the Patuxent. It felt very Southern and very comfortable. By far one of my favorite vacation spots.
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Old 08-20-2012, 07:11 AM
 
3,644 posts, read 9,020,216 times
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when you start hearing people say "yes/no ma'am" "yes/no sir" to people even in their 20s
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Old 08-20-2012, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Lincoln, NE (via SW Virginia)
1,644 posts, read 1,799,578 times
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whenever you pull into a gas station and they have cheerwine....then you'll know.
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Old 08-20-2012, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Atlanta & NYC
6,620 posts, read 11,696,479 times
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When you are below PA.
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Old 08-20-2012, 10:48 AM
 
Location: PG County, MD
582 posts, read 778,727 times
Reputation: 353
Quote:
Originally Posted by ja1myn View Post
When you are below PA.
Ah, the "Roads Suddenly Getting 100% Nicer Line".
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Old 08-20-2012, 11:44 AM
 
10,532 posts, read 8,466,160 times
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It's subtle. When I lived in Cincinnati and came home to Kentucky on weekends, there was an old railroad bridge with considerable presence which crossed I-75 shortly after the urban sprawl of nothern Kentucky yielded to more bucolic countryside. That marked it for me, though just crossing the Ohio River and knowing I was back in Kentucky helped.

That bridge is still there, btw, and everytime I go beneath it, I remember...

However...heading south from border-state-but-still-Southern-Kentucky, there are other indicators: kudzu, the clearly southern Appalachians, little country stores, a few "See Rock City" signs - on barns, if you're lucky enough to be on the right roads (not the Interstate, though I think one or two are visible from I-75 in Tennessee), brown historic site signs along the Interstates which refer to Civil War battlefields, historic home museums, Cherokee, Choctaw, and other Indian sites and place names, lots of big lakes (TVA, etc), grits on the breakfast menus or not on the menu but included whether you order them or not (you see this when you take a break from driving on the Interstate), more country music and gospel and "contemporary Christian" music on the radio (but NPR is available everywhere), lots more Baptist churches, churches unaffiliated with mainstream Protestant denominations but apparently fundamentalist and/or pentecostal, with names like (this is made up, no offense, please) "The One Holiness Church of the Believers in the Living God of the Rock of Ages in Jesus Name Amen", BIG fireworks stores with names like Loony Luke's, Loco Joe's and Crazy Charlie's, small towns with white frame houses with screened porches with green or white-painted rocking chairs, more white frame or brick houses with Greek Revival white columns in front, tree-sized pink crepe myrtles, blue hydrangeas, cypress swamps once you hit halfway down the kudzu line, Spanish moss, live oaks and palmettos nearer the coast, Brunswick stew fundraisers in Virginia, Brunswick stew for sale in groceries in Virginia and Georgia (but hard to find elsewhere), burgoo in Kentucky, family-owned small motels with selectively Deep South names like "The Magnolia Motel" - magnolias! -more above ground pools in backyards, martin gourds, more barbecue establishments than in other regions, more corn and tobacco fields (fewer tobacco fields each year) and tobacco barns - for air-dried or flue-dried, there are significant architectural differences in the barns, sorghum molasses and biscuits on the menu and if you're lucky, sorghum molasses being ground via horse or mule power mills, old handmade ladderback chairs with woven oak slat seats on porches that lack green rockers, old tires used as flower planters (again, on the decline nowadays and a rather blue collar landscaping choice), mimosas and princess trees - invasive but beautiful -, native redbuds and dogwoods, more mockingbirds,...and fire ants, at least halfway down the Kudzu Line.

And probably lots more.
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Old 08-20-2012, 11:50 AM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,828,331 times
Reputation: 4853
Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
Coming from the West on I-40 is a little harder to pinpoint. Shawnee, Oklahoma is the area I identify as making me feel at home. We sat through an entire meal at a fast food place there listening to the people behind us talk about horses and pot-bellied pigs. I loved it.

On I-20 I would say the Mississippi River was the dividing line. I know Texas is Southern, but the terrain is so different from most of the South that is seems more like the West. When you get to a place going West that you can see miles and miles with no trees, that seems like the West too. I felt like I was far away from home until I woke up from our first night with the big sky and looked across at a shopping area and spotted a Lowe's Hardware. Lowe's is home for me. Our ancestors are on the same page on the 1790 Wilkes County census.

I-10 is a wonder. Southern, yes, but not what we see on a daily basis. It has so many bridges. I felt like the area near New Orleans had an identity all its own. Heading north into Alabama and crossing into the Eastern time zone was a good place to call Southern. Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana and Eastern Texas seem more like tourist areas. They were places to visit. I wouldn't want to live there, but I know many people like their lives there. I think they are more of a Gulf Coast area.

So you won't get mad at me, I wouldn't want to live too near the ocean in Eastern North Carolina either. I enjoy visiting, but need more solid ground under my feet.
Huh? Going west from the Mississippi on I-20, there's nothing but trees all the way to Tyler, Texas, and it easily looks like most of the southeast.

I-20 through East Texas and Louisiana is an almost five hour drive. I'm not sure how you managed to overlook that.
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