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Old 08-19-2012, 08:33 PM
 
Location: New York City
50 posts, read 76,343 times
Reputation: 56

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ja1myn View Post
Absolutely. People always ask me why I never considered living in DC since I'm a die-hard NYer and I've never understood it. I went to DC once and didn't like it simply because it didn't feel northern enough to me. The way they talk and just little things that are noticeable turn me off when it comes to Maryland. At least I now know that I'm not alone lol.
For real, I was on Pennsylvania ave in DC once and saw these large green spaces between buildings and sidewalks, southern style muffin top dresses, their obsession with their alma maters and college sports, and their culture in general and its never felt the same as Philly, let alone NYC or Boston to me. It felt like a much denser but shorter Atlanta.

I know in NYC and Philly that they would NEVER let prime sidewalk and potential sidewalk retail space go to waste like that, entirely southern development form. Then there's the mosquitos and humidity from the Potomac, weather, culture, development (although much denser), and interests are all southern with a few northern hints. The drive on 95 from Baltimore to DC is thick forestation during the day and at night you can see lights for homes with ranch looking yards, what's the difference between that and Atlanta?

 
Old 08-19-2012, 08:39 PM
 
Location: Atlanta & NYC
6,620 posts, read 11,676,074 times
Reputation: 6603
Quote:
Originally Posted by wnewberry22 View Post
Haha it's funny because I had a friend from Mississippi that INSISTED on ME being a Yankee. Now I grew up in VA but it was extreme southwestern va...as a geographic reference point my hometown (Bristol) has a va side and a tn side. Ive got a very thick appalachian accent and he called me a Yankee....I guess it's all perspective.
There's no way you're a Yankee if you're from Virginia lol.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Notramick View Post
For real, I was on Pennsylvania ave in DC once and saw these large green spaces between buildings and sidewalks, southern style muffin top dresses, their obsession with their alma maters and college sports, and their culture in general and its never felt the same as Philly, let alone NYC or Boston to me. It felt like a much denser but shorter Atlanta.

I know in NYC and Philly that they would NEVER let prime sidewalk and potential sidewalk retail space go to waste like that, entirely southern development form. Then there's the mosquitos and humidity from the Potomac, weather, culture, development (although much denser), and interests are all southern with a few northern hints.
Completely agree on all accounts, especially the freakin' humidity.
 
Old 08-19-2012, 08:59 PM
 
10,511 posts, read 8,439,237 times
Reputation: 19262
Interesting that you view "these large green spaces" in Washington, D.C. as especially Southern - when the District of Columbia was designed in the late 18th century by a Frenchman!
 
Old 08-19-2012, 09:03 PM
 
Location: Atlanta & NYC
6,620 posts, read 11,676,074 times
Reputation: 6603
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
Interesting that you view "these large green spaces" in Washington, D.C. as especially Southern - when the District of Columbia was designed in the late 18th century by a Frenchman!
You took it too far lol. Open spaces = southern to NYers. Well, for the most part.
 
Old 08-19-2012, 09:03 PM
 
Location: New York City
50 posts, read 76,343 times
Reputation: 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
Interesting that you view "these large green spaces" in Washington, D.C. as especially Southern - when the District of Columbia was designed in the late 18th century by a Frenchman!
Paris has green spaces to but not between sidewalks and buildings. Those arent even green spaces, which is commonly a park, I don't know what else to call those grassed buffer zones between buildings and sidewalks but all I know is that space not being utilized is almost unheard of in NYC and Philly. In NYC, those medians in the middle of the streets have attractions and all of them are used for something. Space is a vitality in the north which is why the densities of northeastern cities like Boston, Philly, and NYC are as high as they are. I can name 3 southern cities that have that DC type of development named Atlanta, Charlotte, and even Miami. I cant think of a single area in Philly and especially Boston or NYC like that. Frankly when Atlanta matures out, its going to be a very dense city and its going to look a lot like DC except no height restrictions. The core is already starting to form just like DC's.
 
Old 08-19-2012, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Dallas
554 posts, read 1,021,925 times
Reputation: 648
Oh, who cares?! That war is over and this is the United States of America. End. Of. Story. If people want to specify an area of this vast nation, well, that's why the states have their names.
 
Old 08-19-2012, 09:37 PM
 
Location: New York City
50 posts, read 76,343 times
Reputation: 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by TowerGuy View Post
that's why the states have their names.
Thanks for bringing this up TowerGuy, DC was the idea of a southern man and it was named after a southern man from Virginia. That man was George Washington. DC was also a tribute from the north to the south under a compromise.

DC wasn't named after any northern men like Paul Revere or Samuel Adams.
 
Old 08-19-2012, 09:43 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,257 posts, read 19,555,335 times
Reputation: 13026
Quote:
Originally Posted by Notramick View Post
For real, I was on Pennsylvania ave in DC once and saw these large green spaces between buildings and sidewalks, southern style muffin top dresses, their obsession with their alma maters and college sports, and their culture in general and its never felt the same as Philly, let alone NYC or Boston to me. It felt like a much denser but shorter Atlanta.
What alma maters? Are you talking about high schools that people attended in Taiwan, Buenos Aires or Mumbai? Because those are the kind of alma maters you're likely to hear people talk about in DC.
 
Old 08-19-2012, 10:05 PM
 
Location: Lincoln, NE (via SW Virginia)
1,644 posts, read 1,796,178 times
Reputation: 1053
UVA, VT, JMU, U. Maryland, Hamden Sydney, ODU, Richmond, Georgetown, etc.......but yeah I know what your driving at.

To me to feel a really solid college football or sports in general culture youve gotta be south of Charlottesville
 
Old 08-19-2012, 10:12 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
1,321 posts, read 2,747,172 times
Reputation: 1464




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