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Old 09-02-2012, 11:01 AM
 
29,946 posts, read 27,415,389 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sonofaque86 View Post
CD has a fascination with the South...I wonder why we never see post about "Where is the North" or "Where is the West" as much as we see post about Southern culture.
I think it's because traditionally, both geography and culture have defined the South, but starting in the mid-20th century many areas of the South--which had been more agrarian overall--began seeing rapid development and urbanization that changed the culture. By contrast, many areas of the Northeast and Midwest were characterized by heavy industrialization, urbanization, immigration, etc. very early on. And then you have the areas that have more or less always been shades of gray compared to other Southern states, like Maryland.

 
Old 09-02-2012, 12:40 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,276 posts, read 19,566,600 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sonofaque86 View Post
CD has a fascination with the South...I wonder why we never see post about "Where is the North" or "Where is the West" as much as we see post about Southern culture.
This isn't completely the case though. For example, NY and PA are northeast states. However, some people consider cities like Buffalo and Pittsburgh to be borderline midwest if not completely midwest.
 
Old 09-02-2012, 12:47 PM
 
Location: Atlanta & NYC
6,620 posts, read 11,680,399 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
This isn't completely the case though. For example, NY and PA are northeast states. However, some people consider cities like Buffalo and Pittsburgh to be borderline midwest if not completely midwest.
That is...damn that's pretty true.
 
Old 09-02-2012, 12:48 PM
 
6,611 posts, read 6,933,234 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
This isn't completely the case though. For example, NY and PA are northeast states. However, some people consider cities like Buffalo and Pittsburgh to be borderline midwest if not completely midwest.
It's different though...you don't see nearly as much emotion, namely fear of being associated with anything southern, as you do in discussions about the South.
 
Old 09-02-2012, 12:53 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,276 posts, read 19,566,600 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeTarheel View Post
It's different though...you don't see nearly as much emotion, namely fear of being associated with anything southern, as you do in discussions about the South.
You still see it though. I've seen a few resident Pittsburghers on C-D who are adamant about Pittsburgh being a northeast city and being associated with northeast coastal cities rather than the midwest cities in Ohio.
 
Old 09-02-2012, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
1,194 posts, read 1,565,980 times
Reputation: 1727
From Va on down.
 
Old 09-02-2012, 02:25 PM
 
Location: NC
1,178 posts, read 2,219,216 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
You still see it though. I've seen a few resident Pittsburghers on C-D who are adamant about Pittsburgh being a northeast city and being associated with northeast coastal cities rather than the midwest cities in Ohio.
You don't see every other post about it though. It's 90% about "what the south" is
 
Old 09-02-2012, 05:06 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
5,413 posts, read 7,713,869 times
Reputation: 3059
Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
I think the Sweet Tea line is no longer applicable. Within the past ten years, sweet tea has spread far beyond the confines of the South.
This is very true. The Sweet Tea Line is not really a worthy indicator anymore, especially with Micky-D's offering it all over the country.

It kinda reminds me of the Coke vs. Soda map. I hear people in Oklahoma/Arkansas/Texas use "soda pop" every now and then, but it is said with a very thick twang. Just because one uses "soda" or, even more likely, the ol' timers utilzation of "sodi pop" does not necessarily indicate it is said with anything other than a Southern accent.

For the record, growing up in Oklahoma my folks always said "coke" or "soft drinks" to refer to carbonated beverages.
 
Old 09-02-2012, 08:50 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,276 posts, read 19,566,600 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sonofaque86 View Post
You don't see every other post about it though. It's 90% about "what the south" is
The south covers a much larger area. Plus, cities that are borderline when it comes to the geographical, historical and/or cultural south are more high profile - D.C., Miami, New Orleans, maybe even Atlanta. So, the controversy is greater.
 
Old 09-02-2012, 10:31 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
2,226 posts, read 3,146,402 times
Reputation: 809
There's also something poetic about the South.
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