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Old 09-04-2012, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Lincoln, NE (via SW Virginia)
1,644 posts, read 1,796,764 times
Reputation: 1053

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BKmachine View Post
No Washingtonian or Marylander with any self respect is gonna call themselves southerners.
I notice that this cat is from DC originally...my guess is some hick from Virginia stole his gf or kicked his rear end one day so he hightailed up to Yankee hell. Enjoy your 4400 dollar studio apartment in bed stuy! I hear the Marcy PJ's have some open units!

 
Old 09-05-2012, 06:14 AM
 
Location: PG County, MD
582 posts, read 777,374 times
Reputation: 353
Quote:
Originally Posted by BKmachine View Post
No Washingtonian or Marylander with any self respect is gonna call themselves southerners.
As a DC person, you have no right to speak for Marylanders too.
Many Marylanders are culturally southerners and calling themselves Northerners would be a lie.
Generally, a native of Columbia claiming to be a southerner makes no sense, and a native of North/Chesapeake Beach claiming to be a northerner makes no sense. Yet it's not that clear cut; there are Northerners in North/Chesapeake Beach and Southerners in Columbia: the culturally Northern parts claiming they have no Southern culture is as false as the Southern parts claiming they have no Northern culture - the whole state is varying degrees of mixture which is often why people are confused. Why don't you learn about my state before making broad statements about its populace.
 
Old 09-05-2012, 06:29 AM
 
Location: PG County, MD
582 posts, read 777,374 times
Reputation: 353
I think it's funny though that 'Southern' has become a very exclusive region while 'Northern' on these forums just seems to mean "Well you aren't southern. Better chuck you in this other group." People act like 'Northern' is only defined by the lack of southern culture. We always talk about sweet tea and grit lines. Where is the pierogi line? The maple syrup line?

Last edited by Tezcatlipoca; 09-05-2012 at 06:38 AM..
 
Old 09-05-2012, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Shaw.
2,226 posts, read 3,146,402 times
Reputation: 809
Quote:
Originally Posted by PosterExtraordinaire View Post
I don't know what those maps are supposed to show me.

Linguistically, it's more of a transition zone (infused with appalachian twang).

culturally, she has very little in common with the culture of the south. Again, hillbilly =/= southern. Hillbillies can be southern or northern depending on where they are. WV and Kentucky are transition hillbillies whereas the hillbillies in Tennessee are more southern.
I'm not really qualified to comment on hillbillies. As for the linguistics, the Appalachian accent is considered a subset of the Inland Southern accent. Southern West Virginia seems to be a transition between Lowland South and Appalachian Inland South. Upper West Virginia seems to be a pure Midland (i.e. Midwestern) accent.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PosterExtraordinaire View Post
Pittsburgh is more Appalachian-rust belt than anything else. The great lakes do include places like Buffalo, Rochester and I'd say the boundary becomes a transition zone around Syracuse.

Expect some upstate New Yorkers to protest vehemently how they are real east coasters
What would Pittsburgh's region include? Parts of Ohio, West Virginia and Upstate New York? Or am I being to broad. I think Pittsburgh's residents may also protest that they are real east coasters, but I don't know.
 
Old 09-05-2012, 08:32 AM
 
Location: Shaw.
2,226 posts, read 3,146,402 times
Reputation: 809
Quote:
Originally Posted by wnewberry22 View Post
I could concede Atlanta maybe but the raleigh durham area just does NOT feel southern to me these days. And IMO the suburbs are worse...Cary...Apex...Wake Forest. Not even a little bit these days
I only went to Raleigh as a kid, so things have quite possibly changed since then, but it felt Southern to me as a kid (similar to the places we went in Virginia).

Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeTarheel View Post
Yeah, southern = bad...
I like the South. I just don't think I live in it. I think DC used to be a Southern city, though, but it aligned itself with the North starting in the Civil War and accelerating during the Great Depression/New Deal.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tezcatlipoca View Post
I think it's funny though that 'Southern' has become a very exclusive region while 'Northern' on these forums just seems to mean "Well you aren't southern. Better chuck you in this other group." People act like 'Northern' is only defined by the lack of southern culture. We always talk about sweet tea and grit lines. Where is the pierogi line? The maple syrup line?
That does bring up a good question. Does the North (or, specifically the Northeast) have a defining set of traits? The people have a reputation for being rude, although, that's a bit overblown. Also, I think we can go beyond rude people.
 
Old 09-05-2012, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Lincoln, NE (via SW Virginia)
1,644 posts, read 1,796,764 times
Reputation: 1053
I don't see how anyone could say that DC is a southern city these days. As I mentioned in previous posts, I don't believe the "south" really starts until you get well into VA...probably below I64. I'm only 25 now but it doesn't seem like i've ever seen DC as the south and I've been quite a few times. Northern VA definitely used to be much more southern feeling than it is now though. I can recall when Manassas was still regarded as the sticks but now it's just as much a part of the DC burbs as Fairfax or Alexandria. Thats the challenge with defining the south by state boundaries. Not only is the south regionally diverse as far as landscape goes (Appalachia, low country, inland flat land) it's also not a clearly defined area by political boundaires, ie., state lines. To me the Northeast just doesn't have the same poetry that the south has. The northeast is gritty and cold. The south just has more of an allure to it which is why it always seems to pop up in these threads. Not only does it pop up ALL the time, when it does pop up EVERYONE wants to discuss it. Hell...we've been talking about the same thing now for over 325 posts.

If you started this type of thread about the Northeast someone would probably just call you a prick and close the thread, lol
 
Old 09-05-2012, 09:23 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,276 posts, read 19,566,600 times
Reputation: 13049
Quote:
Originally Posted by wnewberry22 View Post
I don't see how anyone could say that DC is a southern city these days. As I mentioned in previous posts, I don't believe the "south" really starts until you get well into VA...probably below I64. I'm only 25 now but it doesn't seem like i've ever seen DC as the south and I've been quite a few times. Northern VA definitely used to be much more southern feeling than it is now though. I can recall when Manassas was still regarded as the sticks but now it's just as much a part of the DC burbs as Fairfax or Alexandria. Thats the challenge with defining the south by state boundaries. Not only is the south regionally diverse as far as landscape goes (Appalachia, low country, inland flat land) it's also not a clearly defined area by political boundaires, ie., state lines. To me the Northeast just doesn't have the same poetry that the south has. The northeast is gritty and cold. The south just has more of an allure to it which is why it always seems to pop up in these threads. Not only does it pop up ALL the time, when it does pop up EVERYONE wants to discuss it. Hell...we've been talking about the same thing now for over 325 posts.

If you started this type of thread about the Northeast someone would probably just call you a prick and close the thread, lol
Well, I don't agree with that. The northeast has a lot of beautiful qualities - cities, iconic buildings, historic towns, rural areas, mountains, forests, theme parks, beaches... Really, the whole gamut of things. The south and northeast are both good in different ways. That's a positive thing since it would be boring if everywhere was the same.
 
Old 09-05-2012, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Lincoln, NE (via SW Virginia)
1,644 posts, read 1,796,764 times
Reputation: 1053
Maybe i'm wrong...hell it wouldn't be the first time and probably won't be the last. I've just never personally been a fan of the northeast so I always feel like I look for the bad qualities. Once you get into DC and on up the coast I feel like it just gets worse and worse. I just feel like once you get into the meat of the boswash corridor that it just gets more and more cold. I just don't feel that in the south. To me once you start getting out of the NOVA suburbs people just seem to get nicer. I've always used the gas stations in an area as a litmus test. I mean...obviously gas station employees aren't in six figure jobs...they probably are low(er) on the socioeconomic totem pole and they (usually) aren't transplanted residents. I've always felt like these people are the real gauge for an area...and the attendants i've dealt with outside of the DC suburbs are much nicer than those i've encoutnered up throughout the northeast. That being said...my random sample of gas station employees, from NYC on down into DC through Roanoke...home in Brisol, VA and further south down 81, through Chatt and into ATL and further, seem to become MUCH more hospitable and friendly beyond DC.


But again...all IMO and without and real merit...just one guys experiences.
 
Old 09-05-2012, 01:20 PM
 
774 posts, read 1,697,510 times
Reputation: 681
That does bring up a good question. Does the North (or, specifically the Northeast) have a defining set of traits? The people have a reputation for being rude, although, that's a bit overblown. Also, I think we can go beyond rude people.[/quote]

You ask a very good question indeed! I don't think the North has the same level of identity as "the North" like the South has. On another thread, one poster pointed out that people from Northern states generally don't think about being Northerners much until they go to the South and are kind of confronted with it there. I find that the Northeast and Midwest, both of which make up the North, generally feel no connection to each other. Chicago and NYC, for example do not share a sense of kinship as Northern cities like Atlanta and New Orleans do as Southern cities. There is definitely a shared kinship between Midwesters and to a smaller degree, Northeasterners. With Northeasterners, I see a definitefeeling of unitybetween New Englanders. I have noticed a similar unity between New Yorkers, especially New Yorkers living in other states.
 
Old 09-05-2012, 01:26 PM
 
Location: PG County, MD
582 posts, read 777,374 times
Reputation: 353
Appalachian PA seems to me to have some of the friendliest people around. It's absolutely impossible to go to the store in central PA without finding yourself in a conversation with a total stranger.
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