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Old 09-03-2012, 10:18 AM
 
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The question simply is: when can you be considered to be "from a state"? Can you only say you are from the state where you grew up or upon moving to a state you can immediately say you are from that state? There's often a hazy line...do you have to be born in the state? or is growing up sufficient? what are your opinions?

Case Example: I grew up in NJ since age 2, and now am college student, studying out of state in PA. Of course my permanent residence is still in NJ (which I consider my homestate) and I spend same amount of time in NJ as in PA throughout the year. Am I considered now to be from PA or am I still from NJ? My future plans are to move back to NJ as I will graduate very soon.
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Old 09-03-2012, 10:22 AM
 
Location: NC
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I've been in North Carolina for 2 years and will be here for years to come. However, I was born and raised in South Carolina and when someone ask me where I'm from I will always say South Carolina, but live in NC. I don't think it's natural to claim a state you weren't raised in...

My dad is from NJ/NY. He moved to SC at age 19, but was raised up there as a kid and always refers to being from up north and living down here since college though.

Mom was born in Newark, NJ. Moved to South Carolina at 2 years of age and does not at all claim being "from" NJ. She claims SC, because she was raised there..
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Old 09-03-2012, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Atlanta & NYC
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I feel like "natives" have to be born and raised there. If your roots aren't from that area, how can you be a native?
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Old 09-03-2012, 10:27 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ja1myn View Post
I feel like "natives" have to be born and raised there. If your roots aren't from that area, how can you be a native?
well native is a rather ambiguous term, especially when it comes to US where everybody is descended from immigrants or immigrant themselves. I'm immigrant myself, but came at age 2 and grew up in NJ ever since.
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Old 09-03-2012, 10:28 AM
 
10,630 posts, read 23,406,006 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maast View Post
The question simply is: when can you be considered to be "from a state"? Can you only say you are from the state where you grew up or upon moving to a state you can immediately say you are from that state? There's often a hazy line...do you have to be born in the state? or is growing up sufficient? what are your opinions?

Case Example: I grew up in NJ since age 2, and now am college student, studying out of state in PA. Of course my permanent residence is still in NJ (which I consider my homestate) and I spend same amount of time in NJ as in PA throughout the year. Am I considered now to be from PA or am I still from NJ? My future plans are to move back to NJ as I will graduate very soon.
I don't think you can ever say you're a "native" of a place if you didn't grow up there, but you can call yourself "from" somewhere pretty quick.

I'd say you are a New Jersey "native" (even though you weren't born there; to me, arriving at age 2 is close enough.). Sounds like that's where you both grew up and where you consider to be your permanent home, with college more of a temporary blip.

If you now considered PA to be "home" you could legitimately answer to others that you are "from" PA, unless you are in PA and the question is asked more in context of "where are you from originally," in which case you either say " I was born in X but grew up in NJ," or "I'm from NJ originally."

It all depends on context. There is no real right or wrong answer, although I would say that one can NEVER be a native if you were not born in a place (or move there as a very young child). You can be "from" a place in many contexts (but not all) without being a "native", however.
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Old 09-03-2012, 10:34 AM
 
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It isn't really ambiguous at all...native means "one born or reared in a particular place" (Native - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary). So I would say if you were born there or raised there, or both, you would be consdered a native.

I hear people say that they are practically a native or an adopted native of their city or state, which means that they have lived there a very long time.
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Old 09-03-2012, 10:38 AM
 
456 posts, read 663,011 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uptown_urbanist View Post
I don't think you can ever say you're a "native" of a place if you didn't grow up there, but you can call yourself "from" somewhere pretty quick.

I'd say you are a New Jersey "native" (even though you weren't born there; to me, arriving at age 2 is close enough.). Sounds like that's where you both grew up and where you consider to be your permanent home, with college more of a temporary blip.

If you now considered PA to be "home" you could legitimately answer to others that you are "from" PA, unless you are in PA and the question is asked more in context of "where are you from originally," in which case you either say " I was born in X but grew up in NJ," or "I'm from NJ originally."

It all depends on context. There is no real right or wrong answer, although I would say that one can NEVER be a native if you were not born in a place (or move there as a very young child). You can be "from" a place in many contexts (but not all) without being a "native", however.
Yeah I don't consider PA my home, just the place where I study. I don't feel any connection to it as a 'home', just the place where my university is. When I come back to NJ, I really do feel I'm back at home. Legally though my official residence is in NJ, and all my papers, driver license, etc are still NJ. So wherever I go, I say I'm from NJ, but if question comes up, will say I currently study in PA. So it's rather clear.

I agree also with the native part. I doubt spending those first 2 years would add a lot to my character as a native. I think the most crucial thing in being a native is going to grade school, high-school in the given state, because those are the most crucial years.
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Old 09-03-2012, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Atlanta & NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maast View Post
well native is a rather ambiguous term, especially when it comes to US where everybody is descended from immigrants or immigrant themselves. I'm immigrant myself, but came at age 2 and grew up in NJ ever since.
Ok so then I would consider you a native of NJ.
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Old 09-03-2012, 12:34 PM
 
Location: Pacific NW
6,413 posts, read 10,383,045 times
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You're asking two different questions.

You're a "native" of a state when you're born there, or very nearly were.

You're "from" a state when you live there.
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Old 09-03-2012, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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You can be a "native" to more than one state.
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