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Old 09-11-2012, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Chicago
5,894 posts, read 6,538,445 times
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what states do you consider to be midwestern? i don't think you'd get any agreement of people on the issue. it is a geographic and cultural question that just can't be nailed down.

I'll share my definition (and this is just that: my definition; an opinion, not right or wrong):

Minnesota, Iowa, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio (though this had no bearing on my designation, this is the old Big Ten footprint before it was extend into Neb & PA)

why did I choose these states? I tend to separate the North Central states into Midwest (largely centered around the Great Lakes) and the Great Plains (those wide open spaces and drier lands just don't fit my midwest definition). Thus I would consider the states in the tier going south from North Dakota (ND, SD, Neb, Kan, Okla.....I wouldn't consider Texas to be Great Plains as I'm term it southwest). So from a midwest perspective, I'm lopping off North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, and Kansas (Oklahoma is more south central than north central so it wasn't an issue).

on the next tier of states, Minnesota and Iowa fit into the midwest perfectly (though Iowa is the only one I have included that isn't on the Great Lakes).

Since the Midwest is cultural as well as geographic, I remove the next state south which is Missouri. as a former slave state, there is a cultural different. That would also exclude either Kentucky or West Virginia on the same basis (please note that I am not trying to show a bias against MO, KY, and WV; slavery was national tragedy and the whole nation was tied into it with plenty of northerners getting rich off of it)

no original 13 state fits into a midwest definition, of course, but one could argue that western NYS and western PA are related to the region (although the mountains in PA are definitely not midwestern)
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Old 09-11-2012, 06:53 PM
 
Location: Atlanta & NYC
6,620 posts, read 11,673,911 times
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Ok. There are three states on the West coast. Those are what I consider "the West". Anything in between those and the states that touch the Atlantic Ocean are what I personally consider the Midwest.
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Old 09-11-2012, 09:53 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,523 posts, read 7,465,981 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edsg25 View Post
what states do you consider to be midwestern? i don't think you'd get any agreement of people on the issue. it is a geographic and cultural question that just can't be nailed down.

I'll share my definition (and this is just that: my definition; an opinion, not right or wrong):

Minnesota, Iowa, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio (though this had no bearing on my designation, this is the old Big Ten footprint before it was extend into Neb & PA)

why did I choose these states? I tend to separate the North Central states into Midwest (largely centered around the Great Lakes) and the Great Plains (those wide open spaces and drier lands just don't fit my midwest definition). Thus I would consider the states in the tier going south from North Dakota (ND, SD, Neb, Kan, Okla.....I wouldn't consider Texas to be Great Plains as I'm term it southwest). So from a midwest perspective, I'm lopping off North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, and Kansas (Oklahoma is more south central than north central so it wasn't an issue).

on the next tier of states, Minnesota and Iowa fit into the midwest perfectly (though Iowa is the only one I have included that isn't on the Great Lakes).

Since the Midwest is cultural as well as geographic, I remove the next state south which is Missouri. as a former slave state, there is a cultural different. That would also exclude either Kentucky or West Virginia on the same basis (please note that I am not trying to show a bias against MO, KY, and WV; slavery was national tragedy and the whole nation was tied into it with plenty of northerners getting rich off of it)

no original 13 state fits into a midwest definition, of course, but one could argue that western NYS and western PA are related to the region (although the mountains in PA are definitely not midwestern)

I agree that Wi, Mi, Mn, Ia,Ill, Ind, Oh make up the core of the midwest and they are the "old northwest" states that everyone agrees are midwest. However I think the plains states (north of OK) are also midwestern, although they are transitioning into western states the further west you drive. I also believe that overall Missouri also is midwestern, but it does transition into a southern state as you move south. I go with the US census definition of the midwest, it is the most accepted definition. I respectfully disagree with you also on the statement that western NY and PA are related to the midwest. I know this subject has been beat to death in here, but those places are pure interior northeast. Buffalo really has very little in common with Chicago Detroit or Milwalkee. The only thing they have in common is a freshwater view and alot of winter snow, nothing more.
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Old 09-11-2012, 10:09 PM
 
Location: Raccoon City
814 posts, read 1,071,896 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edsg25 View Post

why did I choose these states? I tend to separate the North Central states into Midwest (largely centered around the Great Lakes) and the Great Plains (those wide open spaces and drier lands just don't fit my midwest definition). Thus I would consider the states in the tier going south from North Dakota (ND, SD, Neb, Kan, Okla.....I wouldn't consider Texas to be Great Plains as I'm term it southwest). So from a midwest perspective, I'm lopping off North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, and Kansas (Oklahoma is more south central than north central so it wasn't an issue).
In terms of national preception, you're in the minority.

The Plains States are Midwest as all get out. They personify what is usually thought of when people think Midwest: tornadoes, farms, prairies, lack of urban areas... They are actually in the middle, and more to the west. In Kansas, I always felt more "pulled" to the West. I never felt any connection to the East. If anything you've created a new region: Mideast.
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Old 09-11-2012, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Keizer, OR
1,376 posts, read 2,515,676 times
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Completely Midwestern: Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, Iowa, Missouri (at least the northern half), Kansas, Nebraska, North and South Dakota.
Somewhat Midwestern: Pennsylvania, Colorado (the eastern half especially), Wyoming, Montana, Oklahoma.
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Old 09-11-2012, 10:35 PM
 
Location: West Tennessee
2,082 posts, read 2,900,302 times
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The U.S. Census defined Midwest, minus the Missouri Bootheel & the rest of the state south of U.S. 60 plus a few pockets north of there, and Illinois within 30 miles of the Ohio River. You can also add far Northern Kentucky.
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Old 09-12-2012, 11:31 AM
 
160 posts, read 335,274 times
Reputation: 203
Do we really need a thread about this every month?
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Old 09-12-2012, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Chicago
5,894 posts, read 6,538,445 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by argot View Post
Do we really need a thread about this every month?
yes
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Old 09-12-2012, 12:09 PM
 
933 posts, read 1,608,043 times
Reputation: 534
Quote:
Originally Posted by edsg25 View Post
Minnesota, Iowa, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio
To this list, I would add Missouri and...

About this much of PA: Attachment 100957

Last edited by BTA88; 02-12-2016 at 02:08 PM..
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Old 09-12-2012, 12:18 PM
 
Location: West Tennessee
2,082 posts, read 2,900,302 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BTA88 View Post
To this list, I would add Missouri and...

About this much of PA: Attachment 100957
Except that a good 20-25% of Missouri is solidly part of the south. I would agree that Missouri is midwestern as a whole however.

And to the OP, I think what makes Missouri (and Kansas) such a special case in the Midwest is the fact that they don't have any part of their states that extend to the latitude of the Great Lakes.
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