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Old 10-17-2012, 10:51 AM
 
Location: Atlanta & NYC
6,620 posts, read 11,694,488 times
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I'd rather pay a higher gas tax and have decent roads that don't rape my vehicle.
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Old 10-17-2012, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Lake Arlington Heights, IL
5,481 posts, read 10,416,474 times
Reputation: 2794
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
I-80/94 at the Illinois-Indiana state line.
prior to reconstructing it a few years ago, I would agree. But now, I don't find it that bad. Extra lanes, traffic moves, pavement is new concrete.
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Old 10-17-2012, 02:37 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,227 posts, read 17,998,336 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BTA88 View Post
I-76 through Philadelphia is pretty terrible. It's just a very poorly laid out road.
It definitely is, but it's worth noting that it was grandfathered into the Interstate Highway system. Pennsylvania built it with its own money back in the late 1940's and early 1950's. (Same with I-376 in Pittsburgh.) Reengineering the highway will be very expensive because it'll need to be widened along its entire route, and either tunneled or cut-and-covered in various parts of the city. Eminent domain would be required along its path in the suburbs. There's also lots of critical infrastructure along the highway that'd need to be either moved or engineered around. The process would take a decade, and it'd probably be better just to do it one aspect at a time until everything comes together.
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Old 10-17-2012, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Columbia, SC
1,860 posts, read 4,446,638 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
It definitely is, but it's worth noting that it was grandfathered into the Interstate Highway system. Pennsylvania built it with its own money back in the late 1940's and early 1950's. (Same with I-376 in Pittsburgh.) Reengineering the highway will be very expensive because it'll need to be widened along its entire route, and either tunneled or cut-and-covered in various parts of the city. Eminent domain would be required along its path in the suburbs. There's also lots of critical infrastructure along the highway that'd need to be either moved or engineered around. The process would take a decade, and it'd probably be better just to do it one aspect at a time until everything comes together.
I forgot about this since I haven't been to Philly in about a decade, but I-76 is a nightmare heading into the city from the west; remember thinking this can't possibly be up to interstate standards! Thanks for the explanation.
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Old 10-17-2012, 03:09 PM
 
Location: Looking over your shoulder
30,348 posts, read 27,845,028 times
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I-76 (east bound) east to Sterling Colo appears to have a number of miles where the cement surface of the highway is uneven. As you drive in either of the lanes you notice a great deal of thumping noise and shaking at all speeds low to high. It was so bad in one area that I thought I had a flat tire and pulled over to the shoulder to check the tires. Flat no, loss of weight that was used in tire balancing, no ~ just bad pavement for a number of miles.

The only other state that I’ve notice poor interstate highway was I-40 in Oklahoma. My guess is that they don’t accept “any” federal money for repairs and upgrades on their highway system of I-40.
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Old 10-17-2012, 03:21 PM
 
Location: 602/520
2,441 posts, read 6,130,941 times
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Pennsylvania, Missouri, and California.

Best: Arizona, Florida, Georgia
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Old 10-17-2012, 03:24 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,227 posts, read 17,998,336 times
Reputation: 14678
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye in SC View Post
I forgot about this since I haven't been to Philly in about a decade, but I-76 is a nightmare heading into the city from the west; remember thinking this can't possibly be up to interstate standards! Thanks for the explanation.
The irony is that the two busiest segments of Interstate highway in Pennsylvania are obsolete (I-76 in Philadelphia, I-376 in Pittsburgh). But that's because they were the first highways to be built, aside from the original segment of the Pennsylvania Turnpike from Irwin to Carlisle. Sometimes it just doesn't pay to be a pioneer, I guess. Just ask the Chicago White Sox, who built their new ballpark the year before "retro" ballparks became the way to go.

If you drive around Philadelphia, you'll notice that I-95, I-276 and I-476 all meet current Interstate standards, as do the recently reconstructed segments of U.S. 202. But I-76 is going to require a lot of time and resources to upgrade, which is probably why nothing has been done about it yet. I-70 south of Pittsburgh and I-83 through Harrisburg are the two other pre-Interstate Interstates in Pennsylvania, but work has begun reconstructing and updating that segment of I-70 (it'll be a six-year process), and there's a preliminary redesign out there for I-83 as well. Both those highways have fewer obstacles to deal with, though.
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Old 10-17-2012, 07:04 PM
 
11,189 posts, read 22,415,451 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
I-80/94 at the Illinois-Indiana state line.
Really?? How is it that bad. The roadway is all concrete in excellent condition. Within 30 miles there are interchanges with 6 freeways and 8 other major roadways, all including flyovers/cloverleafs. The roadway is split with lots of aux lanes alongside the mainline lanes, and runs between 10 and 17 lanes wide from point to point.





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Old 10-18-2012, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Bothell, Washington
2,704 posts, read 4,681,428 times
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I wouldn't say it's the worst in the country, but I-5 through Seattle is bad, it is rough and crumbling. It's kind of surprising given that it's known as a pretty affluent area- but this stretch of interstate appears to have not been resurfaced in many decades.
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Old 10-18-2012, 09:28 AM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,747,894 times
Reputation: 9029
Most of the bad freeways in the Twin Cities are all being rebuilt. It's awesome how are roads are transforming, we had some crappy freeways.
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