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Old 10-19-2012, 08:44 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,045,063 times
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In Oklahoma City, Wal-Mart saturated the area with Supercenters in the late '90s and early '00s, killing off almost every last traditional neighborhood grocer. Albertson's, Baker's, Food Lion, Safeway, and the numerous independent grocers were all picked off one by one by Wal-Mart. By the mid-2000s, the last remaining national chain, Albertson's, pulled out of the market, leaving a situation where you pretty much either shopped at Wal-Mart or went hungry. What's more impressive (or depressing) is that we are talking about a metro of 1.3 million, not some town of 4000 where Wal-Mart came in and put the two mom and pop grocers out of business. Wal-Mart was able to achieve this by saturating the area with Supercenters every few square miles. It was a test market for Wal-Mart to see how much of the grocery market they could capture.

Today, the grocery market in Oklahoma City is starting to slowly correct itself. A few neighborhood local grocers have come back and in 2010 Whole Foods opened up, which was much welcome. There is still a long way to go though and I would say OKC is far behind in this area than other cities where you can pretty much drive to the corner grocer. In OKC, you have to drive a few miles to the Supercenter or drive a little farther to an alternative, depending on where you live, and even then, there is less than a handful of grocery stores in the entire metro that are comparable to what is the standard in most areas. Most of them are dirty, smelly, and outdated. The situation in OKC is truly the worst case scenario as to what Wal-Mart is capable of.

My question is is there any other city where Wal-Mart has attempted and succeeded with doing what they did in OKC? Most people, unless they have a personal moral reason for not shopping at Wal-Mart, will do so if its the most convenient option. Wal-Mart had plans to use the same strategy in Austin, TX but the people fought back in the mid-00s. I guess OKC just didn't have enough anti-Wal-Mart people to put a stop to it before it was too late.
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Old 10-19-2012, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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Not far from Oklahoma City, in DeQueen, Arkansas, the Super WalMart is the only grocery outlet within a 50 mile circle.
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Old 10-19-2012, 10:03 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,045,063 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Not far from Oklahoma City, in DeQueen, Arkansas, the Super WalMart is the only grocery outlet within a 50 mile circle.
A lot of small towns especially in the South and Midwest have been taken over by Wal-Mart. The towns aren't large enough to support the original mom and pop stores and the Wal-Mart Supercenter, and as I said most people will shop at Wal-Mart over the competition unless they have some ethical reason not to. In the mid-90s I lived in a small town of about 20,000 in Missouri about 70 miles or so west of Kansas City. When I moved there in 1992, there was Food 4 Less, Food Barn, Price Chopper, and Consumers Grocery. Wal-Mart opened a Supercenter in 1993 and by the time I moved away in 1996, it was the only game in town.

Wal-Mart really is like a cancer. The situation in OKC shows Wal-Mart isn't only a danger to small towns. If given the ability, they can take over metropolitan areas and destroy the competition if they are aggressive enough.
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Old 10-19-2012, 10:10 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
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Both of those areas sit just barely within the shadows of the Wal-Mart empire, so that isn't surprising.
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Old 10-20-2012, 07:39 AM
 
Location: The South
5,225 posts, read 3,635,618 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post

drive a few miles to the Supercenter or drive a little farther to an alternative, depending on where you live, and even then, there is less than a handful of grocery stores in the entire metro that are comparable to what is the standard in most areas. Most of them are dirty, smelly, and outdated. T

And that is how Walmart got ahead.
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Old 10-20-2012, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Atlanta , Georgia
12 posts, read 18,398 times
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I would Say Walmart Is Dominant In Augusta. They Have like 5 0r 6 Walmarts
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Old 10-21-2012, 11:46 PM
 
363 posts, read 617,769 times
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I would say Wal-Mart seems more dominant in the lower midwest. Once you get north of I-70 you see more grocery chains. I live close to Columbus NE and while Wal Mart is huge, we have a Hy-Vee and a Super Saver (which is only in Lincoln and a few other small cities like Columbus, in NE) and both do pretty good business. It's pretty similar in most towns, at least in Nebraska and Iowa, to have a Wal Mart and a specific grocery store like a Hy-Vee
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