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Old 10-25-2012, 07:40 PM
 
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I live in western Washington and visit other parts of the country and sometimes visit B.C. As much as the climate and countryside are the same from Washington to BC, I always feel much more a differentness when visiting Canada as opposed to visiting almost any part of the US, aside from heavily black inner city areas which is a different discussion altogether. I still feel very much at home even in Alabama as opposed to Vancouver, where I feel I am in another country, which of course I am. I still feel more at home almost anywhere in the US and the differences seem pretty minor to me.
I do agree people in the urban areas seem less patriotic, however I used to live in eastern Washington and patriotic feelings there seem as strong as most parts of the country.
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Old 10-25-2012, 08:34 PM
 
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BBQ's not popular and easily found in the West? There's always exceptions to the rule though. Wouldn't BBQ be easy to find in black areas of LA, SF, Oakland, Seattle, etc? And being "non-religious" and being a fan of football aren't exclusive. I have a left-leaning, non-religious, friend originally from Portland who graduated from Florida and is a HUGE Gators and HUGE SEC college football fan. And a fan of tailgating and BBQ's. Wouldn't you call Seahawks fans die-hard football fans?

I agree with one thing, and from my perspective, from the outside looking in, it seems like the PNW is more diverse in their love of sports(MLS) which is different from parts of the South and the Midwest. But there's always exceptions to the rule. The Oregon Ducks are turning into a HUGE College Football powerhouse, the Beavers/Ducks "Civil War" rivalry is HUGE. In LA, where there is no professional sports team, the Trojans have been HUGE. And California just like their Southern counterparts Florida and Texas produce hundreds, and hundreds and hundreds of College Football and NFL players annually. CA is a football hotbed.

Southerners have migrated to CA for the past 150+ years or so, but mostly this Southern influence is seen GREATER in the Black communities out West. Jazz, Rock N Roll, Hip-Hop, in the West derived from Southern Blacks emigrating to CA and AZ via Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Arkansas. AZ, CA, NV, UT, CO, all seem pretty religious to me. Maybe not bible-belt-like but religious nonetheless. Mormons in UT, Catholics pretty much everywhere else out there, Southern Baptist in LA's black AND White communities(See Saddleback Church). I may be wrong, but what makes the Westcoast different is with a large Asian population, I would guess there is more participation in Asiatic/Eastern religion moreso than the rest of the US.
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Old 10-25-2012, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Ottawa, IL ➜ Tucson, AZ ➜ Laramie, WY
243 posts, read 477,032 times
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I've been to nearly all of the lower 48 states, and have lived in three states, two of which are considered "western." In my experience apart from the deep south and maybe very rural areas of the Midwest (western Nebraska for example), people are pretty homogenous, at least as far as I've been able to tell.

Edit: Totally forgot about Utah, it's a whole other world out there.
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Old 10-25-2012, 09:27 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by belmont22 View Post
Maybe because your family is from back east you feel more connected to 'America' as a nation. I guess I'm mostly talking about the West minus California. Anyway um.

Sure everyone likes BBQ it's tasty, but it's not a huge part of the culture here. Hell there's only a couple months where you even can barbecue on a regular basis in the Northwest, it's probably more popular in the Southwest though.
More nonsense. BBQ has been a topic at my work the last few days and I live within 15 minutes of a fantastic BBQ joint that attracts people from miles away.

Quote:
Walmart is not as popular in the West and came here last. Target, Kmart etc still hold their weight, Walmart is huge everywhere in North America but it doesn't have the complete dominance in the West that it has in most of the South and much of the Midwest.
I live in Thurston County: 3 Wal-Marts, 2 Targets, ZERO K-Marts.

Try again.

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Cheerleaders exist but it's just not as big a thing.
Wrong again. ALL high schools up here have them. Colleges, NFL. Go to a freaking Seahawks, Huskies, or Ducks game some day. Sheesh.

Quote:
Yes, college football and the Seahawks are huge. But you'll find plenty of people who don't give a damn about them. In most of America football is pretty much religion.
IT IS UP HERE TOO! Football is by far the #1 sport here. By far the biggest and most popular in high school, college, and pro. We like other sports too, but that is because we are a great, sports loving region. We have led the NBA, MLB, and MLS in total attendance multiple times. The Seahawks have sold out most of their games in their history.


Quote:
Amusement parks - what about Cedar Point in Ohio? That's in an even colder and comparably wet place compared to the Pacific Northwest.
Our constant WET winter weather is very harsh on outdoor equipment. That is why Silverwood in Idaho (with weather more similar to Ohio) is the NW's flagship theme park. Since there are great ones in California, what's the point? As a kid, that's where went for amusement parks and so did most of my peers.

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Fast food is popular enough but you just don't see as much of it,
More nonsense. Fast food is everywhere. My office is a 2 minute walk away from McDonald's, Wendy's, Arby's, Taco Del Mar, and Subway. 5 minute walk (1 minute drive) away from Carl's Jr., 2 Taco Bells, KFC, Jack in the Box, and Burger King.

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there's also quite a few chains such as Chic Fil A and Waffle House that don't exist or are rare in the west.
That's because this is the far NW corner. We tend to be near the last when it comes to expansion from firms located in the east. You won't find Taco Del Mar in Buffalo, nor Ivar's, nor Dick's.

Quote:
Defends how you define patriotic I guess. I think people are less passionate about being American in the West, aside from the ones who have recent roots in the east.
Complete nonsense.



You need to stop spreading your misinformation about the NW.
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Old 10-25-2012, 09:30 PM
hsw
 
2,144 posts, read 6,349,316 times
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Define "American"

For past 25+yrs vast majority of US (and world's) innovation and wealth creation has occurred in quintessential American regions like SiliconValley, Redmond, DFW, OKC, Hou....and very little in Eastern US (which arguably stopped innovating 50+yrs ago)

Global tech, o&g, finance and consumer-facing innovation has largely been Western US-based for past 30yrs

Places like NYC are largely amusement parks for tourists, not unlike SF or Lond or Paris or Orlando or LV
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Old 10-25-2012, 09:37 PM
 
1,981 posts, read 3,171,753 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by belmont22 View Post
So um, you think Eugene has more in common with Biloxi than it does with Victoria merely by grace of being in the same country as the former
Eugene doesn't have much in common with the rest of the NW. It's on its own planet.

Quote:
The West is isolated by the way.
No, it is not. Most of population is clustered in linear patterns. Travel and communication frictions are at an all time low. For example you are spewing your misinformation/slander of my home state to thousands of people from all corners of the globe just via this thread.
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Old 10-25-2012, 09:41 PM
 
1,981 posts, read 3,171,753 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by belmont22 View Post
The God/guns/football people exist in OR/WA but they're not really the dominant demographic whatsoever.
Wrong again. Visit Cabella's some time. Venture outside of the city limits of Seattle and Portland for a clue. This is huge football country and big time outdoor country. Many iconic outdoor, hunting, and fishing brands are from here.

Religion isn't as strong as some regions in the US, but it is stronger than some places back east, like northern New England.
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Old 10-25-2012, 09:45 PM
 
1,981 posts, read 3,171,753 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by belmont22 View Post
I find that really hard to believe. I'm pretty sure being highly patriotic would be almost looked down upon in Oregon, unless maybe you lived in Salem or Albany or something. Do you have a reference?

Holy cow, you are something else! This area is hugely patriotic! The Puget Sound area is one of the largest military centers in the entire country! Being unpatriotic is looked down upon, BIG TIME around here.
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Old 10-25-2012, 09:48 PM
 
1,981 posts, read 3,171,753 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
No, I lived on the edge of Ashland--which is a relatively liberal oasis from the rest of the area, but I spent a lot of time in Medford and Grants Pass when I was down there...

Yeah, everyone knows about Roseburg's football team--Thurman Bell's been coaching there since the 1970s.

I attended an Ashland state football championship in the 90's. Ashland High School also produced Sonny Sixkiller, so they are high in my book!
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Old 10-25-2012, 09:52 PM
 
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I think folks might want to split the difference here, at least a little. Granted that there are significant differences between Seattle and Vancouver. But is Seattle really, in all ways, more similar to, say, Atlanta or Cleveland, than it is to Vancouver? I don't think so.
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