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Old 10-30-2012, 08:45 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,512 posts, read 17,740,343 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cacto View Post
The Aral Sea is (or was) fresh water.
Quote:
Originally Posted by grapico View Post
No...

They would be tiny seas...

Let's just take a popular sea, the first that comes to mind, ahh, the red sea.

The Red Sea is around 8x larger than Lake Michigan and almost twice as large as all of the Great Lakes combined.
So they would be tiny seas. There is nothing in the accepted definition of seas that indicated a size requirement other than to be a large lake. And they are certainly large lakes.
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Old 10-30-2012, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,269,803 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy View Post
I made my point, unless you are geographically challenged. The whole premise of renaming the Great Lakes to change people's perceptions and attitudes is ridiculous. Comparing the Salton SEA to LAKE Tahoe makes this point quick and concisely. Even some among the geographically challenged understand Lake Tahoe is a popular tourism destination.
There are other relevant distinctions. For example, Lake Tahoe, like most American lakes, is filled with fresh water. The Salton Sea, like most seas in the world, is filled with salt water. The difference between fresh water and salt water is more than "people's perceptions and attitudes", and was very likely a factor in the etymology of their names. Comparing the Salton SEA to LAKE Tahoe makes this point quickly and concisely, but among some geographically challenged, this distinction was ignored.
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Old 10-30-2012, 09:29 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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The distinction between salt and fresh water is not germane to the definition of a sea vs. a lake, at least according to the dictionary definition of 'sea'.
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Old 10-30-2012, 10:05 AM
 
2,426 posts, read 3,622,086 times
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My whole point is that the word Sea and the world Lake bring two very different images to people's heads.

It's kind of like the word hill and mountain. When most people think of the world lake they think of a body of water at a very small scale. When they think of the word sea they think of a very large body of water.

The comparison of Lake Tahoe and Salton Sea only works because we know about them. Let's take someone from Mexico who knows nothing of either, they would most likely automatically think that the Salton Sean is much bigger, grandeur, etc. when compared to Lake Tahoe.
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Old 10-30-2012, 10:43 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
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To me, it doesn't make sense to call a body of water a "lake" if you can't see land on the other side.
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Old 10-30-2012, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Seattle, Washington
3,733 posts, read 6,481,559 times
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Just saw video footage on the news of waves on Lake Michigan from Sandy. Looks like high seas to me! Complete with elevated risk of rip tide, although I don't know who's going to be down on the lake right now anyway!
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Old 10-30-2012, 12:03 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,391 posts, read 24,570,477 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
So they would be tiny seas. There is nothing in the accepted definition of seas that indicated a size requirement other than to be a large lake. And they are certainly large lakes.
But the premise was if it would boost anything about them like their public image... calling them seas would put them in a sea of other seas.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicagoist123 View Post
My whole point is that the word Sea and the world Lake bring two very different images to people's heads.

It's kind of like the word hill and mountain. When most people think of the world lake they think of a body of water at a very small scale. When they think of the word sea they think of a very large body of water.

The comparison of Lake Tahoe and Salton Sea only works because we know about them. Let's take someone from Mexico who knows nothing of either, they would most likely automatically think that the Salton Sean is much bigger, grandeur, etc. when compared to Lake Tahoe.
Maybe in a world with no maps.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
There are other relevant distinctions. For example, Lake Tahoe, like most American lakes, is filled with fresh water. The Salton Sea, like most seas in the world, is filled with salt water. The difference between fresh water and salt water is more than "people's perceptions and attitudes", and was very likely a factor in the etymology of their names. Comparing the Salton SEA to LAKE Tahoe makes this point quickly and concisely, but among some geographically challenged, this distinction was ignored.
The Great Salt Lake might have something to say about that.

Clearly whatever geographers who named these bodies of water did not anticipate such a lively city data thread centuries later.
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Old 10-30-2012, 12:12 PM
 
9,967 posts, read 14,618,894 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Sea tends to be a more Germanic term but given the heavy French population in the area's discovery period combined with the propensity for the English to tart up their speech with Frenchisms, the fact they are called lakes is no great surprise.

Of course they can be called seas, though. A part of the Hudson river that widens considerably north of the mouth of the river was named a sea by the early Dutch settlers, the Tappan Zee. If that is a sea, the great lakes surely qualify. Lake Champlain, too, would be called a sea in Germanic languages.
In German the word "See" means lake. Lake Constance is called the Bodensee in German. Meer is what the Germans call most seas--though they also call the Baltic Sea, "Ostsee".

In Dutch however Zee means sea and Meer means lake--so the Tappen Zee was sort of an interesting place name for basically a wide spot in the river.
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Old 10-30-2012, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Phoenix Arizona
2,032 posts, read 4,036,187 times
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It's gone now, but this large freshwater lake was called a sea for centuries.

Aral Sea - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The nearby Caspian Sea is 1/3 the salinity of seawater so it qualifies as a salty freshwater lake.

Caspian Sea - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 10-30-2012, 07:50 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,523 posts, read 7,465,981 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ja1myn View Post
Why do you care OP? They're just lakes...


They are more than "just lakes". They are one of North Americas great geologic features, they are unique and they contain 1/5 of the worlds fresh water. Why do people like the OP care??? well for the same reason Arizona residents love the Grand Canyon, for the same reason Colorado residents love the Rockys and for the same reason the people of New York City love the Empire state building and the Statue of Liberty. The Great Lakes are a source of regional pride in the upper midwest, and they are beautiful.
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