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Old 09-22-2014, 10:41 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michigan83 View Post
Older does not equal run-down. A lot of the older homes in the Northeast are beautiful and well-kept. In Florida, it seems like everything is either brand new (hasn't had time to deteriorate at all), or you have the other extreme of extremely dumpy looking shacks. I do not recall seeing many quaint, historical, well-kept older homes in Florida.
I always point people towards Key West and Saint Augustine if they want to see some of the most historic and well-kept homes that Florida has to offer. The core neighborhoods of Florida's major cities, especially Jacksonville, also has a few well-kept historic blocks. Of course, you're not going to find many established historic neighborhoods in Florida compared to many other places, but they're there nonetheless.
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Old 09-22-2014, 11:25 AM
 
1,750 posts, read 1,631,192 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michigan83 View Post
Older does not equal run-down. A lot of the older homes in the Northeast are beautiful and well-kept. In Florida, it seems like everything is either brand new (hasn't had time to deteriorate at all), or you have the other extreme of extremely dumpy looking shacks. I do not recall seeing many quaint, historical, well-kept older homes in Florida.
Older does not equal rundown? Since when? Unless they are renovated, older houses do look run down (it's the same as cars). The plus for FL is that houses down here are built more solidly due to hurricanes being an imminent threat. Houses up north are mostly wooden and cost an arm and a leg due to COL.

Many of the houses you call shacks were built in the 50's, 60's or even 70's and were to be retirement or 2nd houses, hence why their square footage was less than comparable houses up north. People also complain about mobile homes being unsightly etc.. those were built exactly for the same reason. When you retire, perhaps you'll need a smaller place too, which in essence, it will potentially look like a shack 50 yrs from now.

Run down to me means seeing graffiti, trash in the neighborhood and falling windows (FL has very little graffiti). I've seen more run down areas in the Northeast(especially in the major cities which have more poverty/ghettos than down here.)
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Old 09-22-2014, 12:58 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
3,076 posts, read 5,448,737 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trigger-f View Post
Older does not equal rundown? Since when? Unless they are renovated, older houses do look run down (it's the same as cars). The plus for FL is that houses down here are built more solidly due to hurricanes being an imminent threat. Houses up north are mostly wooden and cost an arm and a leg due to COL.

Many of the houses you call shacks were built in the 50's, 60's or even 70's and were to be retirement or 2nd houses, hence why their square footage was less than comparable houses up north. People also complain about mobile homes being unsightly etc.. those were built exactly for the same reason. When you retire, perhaps you'll need a smaller place too, which in essence, it will potentially look like a shack 50 yrs from now.

Run down to me means seeing graffiti, trash in the neighborhood and falling windows (FL has very little graffiti). I've seen more run down areas in the Northeast(especially in the major cities which have more poverty/ghettos than down here.)
I feel like it is going to be a huge waste of time to try to explain to you why well kept older houses can be more attractive than newer houses. Your mentality is very typical of the sun belt and I'm probably not going to change it by arguing on the internet.
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Old 09-22-2014, 01:13 PM
Status: "Got the rocking modern neon sound" (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: Boston
2,031 posts, read 1,990,051 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawaii4evr View Post
I'd rather live in Florida. Better weather, nicer beaches, just a better lifestyle IMO.
Eh.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trigger-f View Post
For the most part NE looks stagnant to me. If FL is rundown, what exactly do you call countless neighborhoods in NE with houses from the early 1900's or even before that?
Oh the horror!!!!!
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Old 09-22-2014, 01:19 PM
 
1,750 posts, read 1,631,192 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michigan83 View Post
I feel like it is going to be a huge waste of time to try to explain to you why well kept older houses can be more attractive than newer houses. Your mentality is very typical of the sun belt and I'm probably not going to change it by arguing on the internet.
Dude, get over it. They are mostly made of wood, Mickey Mouse structures (you can take them down with a sledgehammer). You should study the Three little pigs tale. Also, take a trip to some other areas of the world to see how well made structures(mainly of concrete) are built. At least those you called shacks in FL, are made of concrete blocks.
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Old 09-23-2014, 08:04 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trigger-f View Post
Dude, get over it. They are mostly made of wood, Mickey Mouse structures (you can take them down with a sledgehammer). You should study the Three little pigs tale. Also, take a trip to some other areas of the world to see how well made structures(mainly of concrete) are built. At least those you called shacks in FL, are made of concrete blocks.
And they've survived fine for 100 years. Just because it's old doesn't mean there's anything wrong or run down about it.

Quote:
Run down to me means seeing graffiti, trash in the neighborhood and falling windows (FL has very little graffiti). I've seen more run down areas in the Northeast(especially in the major cities which have more poverty/ghettos than down here.)
Plenty of old areas have none of those things.
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Old 09-23-2014, 09:52 AM
 
14,111 posts, read 22,753,233 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michigan83 View Post
Older does not equal run-down. A lot of the older homes in the Northeast are beautiful and well-kept. In Florida, it seems like everything is either brand new (hasn't had time to deteriorate at all), or you have the other extreme of extremely dumpy looking shacks. I do not recall seeing many quaint, historical, well-kept older homes in Florida.
They have quaint older historic districts all over Tampa Bay and South Florida. I could name plenty of neighborhoods.
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Old 09-23-2014, 10:01 AM
 
14,111 posts, read 22,753,233 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iAMtheVVALRUS View Post
Eh.



Oh the horror!!!!!
Why the "Eh" when he said Florida has nicer beaches? Florida has world renowned beaches.
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Old 09-23-2014, 10:51 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,679 posts, read 49,437,227 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michigan83 View Post
Older does not equal run-down. A lot of the older homes in the Northeast are beautiful and well-kept. ...
I see a lot of century+ mature homes around where I live, one-room schoolhouses too.

Some of them have aged very well, some have not.

If you like the architecture [many do] then it is great !

If you don't than don't buy one. I built a new house. Nobody is forced into buying an old house.
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Old 09-23-2014, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Denver
6,628 posts, read 12,505,595 times
Reputation: 4054
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trigger-f View Post
Dude, get over it. They are mostly made of wood, Mickey Mouse structures (you can take them down with a sledgehammer). You should study the Three little pigs tale. Also, take a trip to some other areas of the world to see how well made structures(mainly of concrete) are built. At least those you called shacks in FL, are made of concrete blocks.
You talk about how fragile these old houses are...these old houses which are over 100 years old...these old houses which deal with blizzards every winter...they don't seem fragile.
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