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Old 09-23-2014, 11:07 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
Is this the one that also severely affected Long Island? Or was that a different one?

I saw a cool map recently, it was an image of the East Coast and some more inland Eastern states with lines drawn to show which hurricane people remember as being the worst hurricane to ever hit their area. All of NJ pretty much had Sandy, for example, and same for NYC, but LI had something else (I thought it was the 1938 one), and most of New England had that one you mentioned.
Yeah, the 1938 hurricane. I think Rhode Island got it the worst but the 1938 hurricane completely smashed Westhampton and other coastal communities so it is still talked about today by Long Islanders.

This is a list of New England hurricane in the 1800s and 1900s. As you can see of the 3 dozen hurricanes to make landfall in New England, only three hurricanes hit as category 3. None hit as category 4 or 5. And most were weakened to tropical storms or depressions.

List of New England hurricanes - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 09-23-2014, 11:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
For Katrina, the water that flooded was all from the lake, correct? The storm surge from the ocean to an oceanfront town or city is more powerful than a storm surge from a river or lake. I live in a town with a winding river that floods severely, but homes are never knocked off their foundations, wooden or not (actually I think in Irene 3 were but 2 of those homes also had trees fall on them in addition to flooding which is probably what did it). And my town also had levees that broke in Irene, causing 6+ feet of water to rush in in minutes, submerging homes up to their second floors for blocks. On the other hand, when the ocean came barreling in in Sandy, homes, wooden and sometimes not, were knocked off their foundations left and right. The pounding waves and strong tides and pulls are more powerful, I'd imagine.
The location of the storm surge might have a lot to do with the extent of damage. I found this graphic showing the flooding throughout New Orleans and it seems quite extensive.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Effect...2005-Merge.gif

I'm not sure how would it be if NOLA was off the ocean or directly off the gulf. I believe there was also flooding come from the Mississippi river. I think NOLA also has some points where elevation is below sea level, so that should have something to do with how bad the flooding is.

Quote:
How far inland are Key West's still standing old wooden structures, just curious? How many blocks? I doubt there are many, if any, on the beach or even beach block. I'm not surprised that there are still old wooden structures standing there but at the same time, the Keys have many homes that are up on stilts, which proves something about architecture and storm strength there.

Hurricanes don't bother me, as an aside. As long as I have a beach home that is built to withstand it, I'm fine living somewhere that gets frequent hurricanes, like Florida. I would probably evacuate, but knowing my home is elevated and held firm into the ground, I would be okay with it.
Many of the historic structures tend to be located on the west side of Key West, or the Key West Historic District. Here's an exerpt from keywestcity.com:

"The Historic District of Key West is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. More than 2500 buildings and structures, much of them built in wood, contributes to the unique historic urban fabric that attracts thousands of visitors each year. From Ernest Hemingway to cigar makers' cottages it is through the preservation of historic buildings that we keep a connection with the past; a past that needs to be preserve for future generations."

City of Key West, Florida / Historic Architectural Review Commission (HARC)

Here are a few properties:

1889 home that was owned by artist Stephen Avila. Sold in 2012 for half a million. Renovated by the new owners.
625 Eaton St, Key West, FL 33040 - Zillow

1890 home that's currently on sale for 1.4 million:
530 William St, Key West, FL 33040 is For Sale - Zillow

Here's a commercial property off Duval that was built in 1918. This is actually outside the historic district:
829 Simonton St, Key West, FL 33040 - Zillow

This one was built in 1898 and is being sold for 1.2 million:
416 Margaret St, Key West, FL 33040 is For Sale - Zillow

There are a lot of properties in Key West that were built around the 1930s and 1940s. But you still have a decent amount of structures that have survived from as far back as the late 1800s.
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Old 09-24-2014, 07:33 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LordHomunculus View Post
I watch that video and I already see a few homes standing while others were completely destroyed.

I'm not saying that wooden homes can sustain more damage than a concrete home, especially a one-level concrete home, but you make it sound that a hurricane hitting an area with wooden homes = 100% nuked, even though a lot of Key West's and NOLA's wooden homes are still there. Also, the damage a hurricane can cause sometimes depends on the tornado's that a hurricane can produce. That's probably one of the reasons why some homes in these hurricane Sandy pictures are gone and some are left standing:

http://static3.demotix.com/sites/def...dy_1609228.jpg

http://www.prideadjusters.com/wp/wp-...ndy-damage.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...._30,_2012.jpg

http://www.trbimg.com/img-5092b5c4/t...-20121-001/600

Also, check out this home for sale in Key West. It was built in 1908:

904 Terry Ln, Key West, FL 33040 is For Sale - Zillow

And there's plenty more like it.
The issue here is people thinking that FL has shacks. The previous poster claimed that. In actuality, these shacks can handle natural disasters better than ALL wood houses, as in the NE/New England. There will always be damage from a major hurricane to all structures, from tornadoes or not, but even in those cases, concrete houses have the most chances surviving.

I was in Phuket, Thailand, in 2006 (2 yrs after the tsunami) and saw how Thai people were building newer (post tsunami) houses (concrete structures with rebar plus reinforced concrete walls, pretty much 2 story bunkers. Those could probably withstand a Cat 4,5 hurricane and similar tornado; there was nothing made of wood on the structure(s). Now, in the Northeast they sell you Mickey Mouse houses for half a mil + and then you get characters like the previous posters calling FL houses shacks. The real overpriced shacks are up north. Need to travel overseas to see how they build houses (in natural disaster prone areas).
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Old 09-24-2014, 07:46 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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This Florida builder says modern wooden homes can withstand wind speeds up to 120 mph:

https://blog.icihomes.com/2010/03/19...ed-wood-frame/
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Old 09-24-2014, 07:56 AM
 
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wood frame homes vs. concrete homes

>>I went through Hurricane Andrew (Cat 5, the eye of the storm came over my parents house while we were in it.) The home is CBS and survived the storm and the tornadoes during the storm. The roof stayed on, walls were not damaged, we did have damage to the french doors which let in the rain and wind but for the most part the house did excellent compared to a wood frame home.
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Old 09-24-2014, 08:09 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
3,077 posts, read 5,452,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trigger-f View Post
The issue here is people thinking that FL has shacks. The previous poster claimed that. In actuality, these shacks can handle natural disasters better than ALL wood houses, as in the NE/New England. There will always be damage from a major hurricane to all structures, from tornadoes or not, but even in those cases, concrete houses have the most chances surviving.

I was in Phuket, Thailand, in 2006 (2 yrs after the tsunami) and saw how Thai people were building newer (post tsunami) houses (concrete structures with rebar plus reinforced concrete walls, pretty much 2 story bunkers. Those could probably withstand a Cat 4,5 hurricane and similar tornado; there was nothing made of wood on the structure(s). Now, in the Northeast they sell you Mickey Mouse houses for half a mil + and then you get characters like the previous posters calling FL houses shacks. The real overpriced shacks are up north. Need to travel overseas to see how they build houses (in natural disaster prone areas).
I never said the shacks in Florida were structurally unsound. My point was that they are ugly.
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Old 09-24-2014, 08:19 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michigan83 View Post
I never said the shacks in Florida were structurally unsound. My point was that they are ugly.
Aha, and the Northeast/New England does not have ugly houses? Dude, your post was intended to belittle FL. Point is ugly shacks can take the pounding of hurricanes better than the mickey mouse houses that look good to you (to me they look like doll houses made of cardboard).
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Old 09-24-2014, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Derby, CT
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This is really a worthless conversation. People have their preferences... I also prefer the colonial look, but I understand why people would want the Florida look (being that I've lived in both areas).
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Old 09-24-2014, 09:06 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wolf39us View Post
This is really a worthless conversation. People have their preferences... I also prefer the colonial look, but I understand why people would want the Florida look (being that I've lived in both areas).
Did anybody ask you? Move on...
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Old 09-24-2014, 10:12 AM
 
1,428 posts, read 1,822,597 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trigger-f View Post
The issue here is people thinking that FL has shacks. The previous poster claimed that. In actuality, these shacks can handle natural disasters better than ALL wood houses, as in the NE/New England. There will always be damage from a major hurricane to all structures, from tornadoes or not, but even in those cases, concrete houses have the most chances surviving.

I was in Phuket, Thailand, in 2006 (2 yrs after the tsunami) and saw how Thai people were building newer (post tsunami) houses (concrete structures with rebar plus reinforced concrete walls, pretty much 2 story bunkers. Those could probably withstand a Cat 4,5 hurricane and similar tornado; there was nothing made of wood on the structure(s). Now, in the Northeast they sell you Mickey Mouse houses for half a mil + and then you get characters like the previous posters calling FL houses shacks. The real overpriced shacks are up north. Need to travel overseas to see how they build houses (in natural disaster prone areas).
Yeah, it does seem like concrete construction has become more prominent outside the U.S., specifically in areas that are more prone to natural disasters. So far, I think concrete homes are pretty widespread in the Caribbean, Asia, Australia, South America, Central America and South Africa.

Quote:
Originally Posted by michigan83 View Post
I never said the shacks in Florida were structurally unsound. My point was that they are ugly.
I assume you're referring to the 1950s-70s ranch homes that are seen throughout Florida? Like most types of homes, they can look great with the right makeover and setting. They're small, but so are many other types of homes (like those shotguns homes in Key West), but they can still look great and are attractive enough to house retirees, young professionals, small families, etc. Many of them have a unique 70s retro look and in more up-and-coming sectors, they look real nice imo.

Here are a few from Zillow:
1604 Cole Rd, Orlando, FL 32803 is For Sale - Zillow

3709 Mockingbird Ln, Orlando, FL 32803 is For Sale - Zillow

311 Russlyn Dr, West Palm Beach, FL 33405 is For Sale - Zillow

1028 W Smith St, Orlando, FL 32804 is For Sale - Zillow

212 E Kaley St, Orlando, FL 32806 - Zillow
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