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Old 11-19-2012, 05:59 AM
 
5,707 posts, read 8,775,783 times
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Downtown Knoxville was deader than a doornail in the 90's.

I take that back - there was a CVS and a great discount department store but downtown was deserted after office hours. The Old city nearby was hoppin' though.

Now there are condos downtown and 10 times more restaurants and bars. People walking around at all hours. Not much practical shopping except Mast General store and a smaller convenience type market, though.

I've seen this resurgance in other small/ mid size cities. Any opinions what brought it on?
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Old 11-19-2012, 06:11 AM
 
3,683 posts, read 8,852,627 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by workaholics View Post
Atlanta had Olympic fever for much of the 1990s. There were a ton of infrastructure improvements and a building boom. I don't know if the population increased but the city was definitely hopping in preparation for the '96 games. Buckhead became a truly urban district, Midtown had a big highrise boom, while downtown was retrofitted for the incoming tourists. It was definitely an exciting time to be in the city of Atlanta, even if the city became a bit too overcommercialized. Remember Izzy? He was everywhere.
The 90's is the decade when Atlanta went through the biggest change, and growth. Of course Atlanta continued to grow and change in the 2000's as well, but it levelled off during the late 2000's recession.
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Old 11-19-2012, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Mt. Airy
5,311 posts, read 5,339,857 times
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Richmond VA was the murder capital with 59 murders per 100,000 residents in 1995. There was population loss and the retail district in downtown collapsed.

Things are much better now, with increases in residential population every year, tons of projects, the murder rate is a small fraction of what it used to be. Retail has even been returning in downtown, albeit very slowly.
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Old 11-19-2012, 09:42 PM
 
Location: Charleston, SC
723 posts, read 1,399,675 times
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Charleston had so many phases in the 90s. At the beginning of the decade it was recovering from Hugo. In 1993 the Naval Base began to close. The metro actually lost population for several years in the mid 90s. By 1999 it started to recover to the strong economy we have today.

The North Charleston Coliseum opened in 1993. Before that, there was no big arena in town. All the major concert tours went through town because of the Coliseum. There were a lot more natives than there are today. You rarely saw Ohio and other out of state plates like you do now. GA and NC were most common.
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Old 11-19-2012, 11:30 PM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
5,516 posts, read 17,696,899 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by natethegreatforlife View Post
Cleveland then:





Cleveland now:
That's the Bronx.
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Old 11-19-2012, 11:45 PM
 
14,111 posts, read 22,779,668 times
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Originally Posted by belmont22 View Post
Probably yeah. It's just amazing how '91 looks so much older than say, '98. Maybe it's because '91 still wasn't that computerized? The graphics in news/TV from the early 90's resemble those from the 70's and 80's more than they do of the late 90's onwards.
Yeah, there does seem to be a difference of media technology between the early 90's and the late 90's. Technology has made a huge jump in the last 10 years to say the least. 02' compared to 12' is pretty amazing. Things have changed musically also. New Age Hipsters, New Media(internet culture) and the like are kinda different. But most importantly, even though 10yrs have past, the teenagers from 02' who are now in their late-20's early 30's are considered part of the same generation of teenagers today, since each generation spans 15 or so years. Most folks think a generation spans 5 or 7yrs, but it spans about 13-15yrs. So a 17yr of today old and a 27yr old of today are considered part of the same generation. I might've strayed way of topic.
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Old 11-20-2012, 01:20 AM
 
Location: Keizer, OR
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I lived in a suburb of Portland back in the 90s. It's still the same gentrified, master planned community town that it was before, only difference is there's a lot more new developments. Pretty much all the fields I would play in as a kid are developed with houses now. I remember listening to a lot of grunge music, and seeing grunge fashion, even after it died out in other parts of the country. Now I see more people wearing Nike and other athletic fashions. I still do see a lot of kids playing outside when I go back however, a rare sight in today's world of paranoid parenting.

I know that the LA area used to have more air pollution than it does now, I guess those clean air ordinances are actually working.
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Old 11-20-2012, 11:59 AM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 18 days ago)
 
48,276 posts, read 45,557,145 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by workaholics View Post
Atlanta had Olympic fever for much of the 1990s. There were a ton of infrastructure improvements and a building boom. I don't know if the population increased but the city was definitely hopping in preparation for the '96 games. Buckhead became a truly urban district, Midtown had a big highrise boom, while downtown was retrofitted for the incoming tourists. It was definitely an exciting time to be in the city of Atlanta, even if the city became a bit too overcommercialized. Remember Izzy? He was everywhere.
I moved to metro Atlanta in February 1996, specifically to the suburb of Marietta. When I look back to 1990s Atlanta, it felt like a big mixture of things. On one hand, I was coming to a place where Braves mania was big(they had won the World Series the year before), and I certainly remember Olympic fever. There was alot of growth going on. Atlanta also had a big party scene back then, particularly with Freaknik. Atlanta during the 90s also had one of the highest murder rates in the USA. The murder rate was actually higher than Detroit's murder rate during part of the 90s.

I later moved out to Paulding County in 1997, and I have memories of subdivisions being built. In my parents subdivision, there were still houses being built.
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Old 12-17-2012, 03:03 PM
 
1,405 posts, read 1,646,294 times
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Cleveland in the 90s had a ton of momentum due to the Rock Hall, the Indians, Tower City being a draw, Drew Carey, a strong (albeith corrupt) mayor, and the Flats. Hell, the nickname "Comeback City" even replaced "Mistake on the Lake" for a while. Unfortunately most of this momentum was centered downtown, and there was minimal overlap to the neighborhoods. Today the city is cleaner, has more people living downtown, and possesses several entertainment districts downtown, not to mention some ongoing major projects. However, downtown Cleveland is ultimately just a fraction of the city, as much of the east side ranges from dead to a warzone, outside of the most eastern part: University Circle. A few west side neighborhoods have re-inventened themselves nicely, two of which are probably the closest thing Cleveland has to a "real" neighborhood: Ohio City and Tremont, with Detroit-Superior transitioning nicely. However, the crime that had plagued the eastside has been infiltrating the westside, so it is no longer a good blue collar, low-mid income area. It's just a lot rougher and sadder.

The workforce has also been decimated in the last 20 years. Walking around downtown Cleveland vs 20 years ago, at least during the day, is just depressing. It feels a lot emptier. Cleaner, but emptier.
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Old 12-18-2012, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Augusta GA
880 posts, read 2,531,952 times
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Atlanta in the early 90's had an insane violent crime rate. Looking at FBI statistics going back to 1960, I have yet to find a city over 50,000 people that had as high a violent crime rate as Atlanta did in 1990 (the year I moved to GA). The only city that comes close is Miami during the 1980's drug wars. Though the crime rate is still above average, it is lightyears ahead of where it was in the early and mid 90's.
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