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View Poll Results: Do you think Tulsa's a smale scale Portland?
Yes 12 10.00%
No 108 90.00%
Voters: 120. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 11-23-2012, 08:33 PM
 
Location: MPLS
1,068 posts, read 1,095,471 times
Reputation: 667

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Howest2008 View Post
Ha! Loved the "bike lanes: 1". It just goes to show how far apart the cultures are and their respective cityscapes as a result. The case can be made that Minneapolis is a smaller-scale Portland (population 380,000 vs Tulsa's 395,000, but has so much more to show for it) as evidenced by being very liberal/cultured (gays, vegans, and cyclists: oh my!). Tulsa, not so much (gay bashers, steak & potato eaters, and motorists: bleh).
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Old 11-25-2012, 11:18 AM
 
178 posts, read 349,919 times
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This was a good read. Tulsa's Cool--could become a catchy name for themselves in the years to come. Mayor to Tulsans: City needs a 'brand' name | Tulsa World
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Old 11-25-2012, 01:54 PM
 
5,819 posts, read 5,187,315 times
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I lived in Tulsa for a year, then nearby for another 3 1/2 years, and I've visited Portland several times between the 1970s and now, so . . .

Tulsa really is a pretty small city. It has a beautiful, excellent University, two great museums, some interesting architecture, and some cool independent stores. It's in a wooded, lovely regional environment, and has a nice climate. But . . .

There's a completely different vibe between the two cities. Although Tulsa has some hipsters, the majority culcha is still Southern Baptist to the core. And my guess is that Tulsa has more poverty and per capita, more crime (haven't looked up the stats). Public transportation is much better in Portland. On the plus side I'm sure that housing and cost of living in general are much less expensive in Tulsa than Portland.

I do miss the Tulsa area now and then, but if I could choose between living in one or the other I'd choose Portland.
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Old 11-25-2012, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,697 posts, read 23,672,920 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 601halfdozen0theother View Post
I lived in Tulsa for a year, then nearby for another 3 1/2 years, and I've visited Portland several times between the 1970s and now, so . . .

Tulsa really is a pretty small city. It has a beautiful, excellent University, two great museums, some interesting architecture, and some cool independent stores. It's in a wooded, lovely regional environment, and has a nice climate. But . . .

There's a completely different vibe between the two cities. Although Tulsa has some hipsters, the majority culcha is still Southern Baptist to the core. And my guess is that Tulsa has more poverty and per capita, more crime (haven't looked up the stats). Public transportation is much better in Portland. On the plus side I'm sure that housing and cost of living in general are much less expensive in Tulsa than Portland.

I do miss the Tulsa area now and then, but if I could choose between living in one or the other I'd choose Portland.
I didn't look up the crime stats but here's a couple of things on Portland poverty you may be interested to learn.

http://daily.sightline.org/2009/11/19/oregons-shocking-hunger-stats/
Oregon's homeless student population again tops 20,000 students | OregonLive.com
Oregon #1 in Homelessness | Blogtown, PDX
I realize that 2009 was a few years back but things have not improved since this blog was written. Still as in any other city, if you have the means, you can find nice places to live if you close your eyes to all of this.
If you are looking for churches, there are quite a few really beautiful old ones in the downtown area. Many give shelter to the homeless.
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Old 11-25-2012, 04:41 PM
 
5,694 posts, read 8,764,670 times
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I looked up housing in both cities on CL. 3+ BR 4-800 a month

100 replies on Portland - all appeared to be in outlying areas except for a couple of obvious scams.

Tulsa returned 500+ ads, most seemed to be in the city.

I'd say it is a lot easier to be poor in Tulsa.
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Old 11-25-2012, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,048,482 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by creeksitter View Post
I looked up housing in both cities on CL. 3+ BR 4-800 a month

100 replies on Portland - all appeared to be in outlying areas except for a couple of obvious scams.

Tulsa returned 500+ ads, most seemed to be in the city.

I'd say it is a lot easier to be poor in Tulsa.
Your dollar gets you a lot more in Tulsa. Jobs in Tulsa almost certainly pay less but the cost of living is much, much lower. There is a reason for that however. Places that people, especially the youth, WANT to live like Portland are going to have higher COL. Tulsa is very much like Little Rock, OKC, Wichita, etc in that many young, educated professionals move away. Austin is a very popular spot for the young people in this part of the country but I know several people who have moved to Portland. One definite plus I can see for a place like Tulsa is the job competition is relatively low for young professionals. If you think you could make Tulsa (or OKC or Little Rock) work, you have a pretty good shot at landing a decent job. Contrast that to a hipster paradise like Austin or Portland which have low unemployment rates but when every 20-something across the country wants to move there it makes it much more difficult to find employment unless you know somebody to plug you in. If you aren't the best and the brightest, you are very unlikely to get noticed.
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Old 11-26-2012, 07:38 PM
 
Location: MPLS
1,068 posts, read 1,095,471 times
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The problem with Tulsa in that department is that it's not in the list of cities that serve as "the next best thing" for lack of a better term, as far as the youth looking to flock to Portland/Austin. It's third tier at best: cities like some of those in the Great Lakes while not at he same level as Portland, Austin, or Minneapolis, have much more to offer this demographic now than Tulsa does. Tulsa is no Milwaukee or Pittsburgh or Columbus, to name a few. What is Tulsa's answer to Brady Street, Short North, or Lawrenceville, respectively? Any of those offers several blocks while hipsters in Tulsa get a lonely block on the edge of Downtown: do a 360 to see just how desolate it is. It's really no contest for any young person wanting to live in a liberal urban environment: any of the aforementioned cities offer a multitude more of the urban amenities this demographic is seeking and in these cities their dollar goes further than what they and can, or more precisely can't get in Tulsa. So Tulsa basically is cheaper, but with little to do, whereas for just a little bit more you get a lot more without needing to move to the top-tier liberal and dense cities with even more amenities.
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Old 11-26-2012, 08:27 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,048,482 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mplsite View Post
The problem with Tulsa in that department is that it's not in the list of cities that serve as "the next best thing" for lack of a better term, as far as the youth looking to flock to Portland/Austin. It's third tier at best: cities like some of those in the Great Lakes while not at he same level as Portland, Austin, or Minneapolis, have much more to offer this demographic now than Tulsa does. Tulsa is no Milwaukee or Pittsburgh or Columbus, to name a few. What is Tulsa's answer to Brady Street, Short North, or Lawrenceville, respectively? Any of those offers several blocks while hipsters in Tulsa get a lonely block on the edge of Downtown: do a 360 to see just how desolate it is. It's really no contest for any young person wanting to live in a liberal urban environment: any of the aforementioned cities offer a multitude more of the urban amenities this demographic is seeking and in these cities their dollar goes further than what they and can, or more precisely can't get in Tulsa. So Tulsa basically is cheaper, but with little to do, whereas for just a little bit more you get a lot more without needing to move to the top-tier liberal and dense cities with even more amenities.
I agree with this for the most part. Tulsa is the kind of place that anybody under 30 simply lives there because they HAVE to, not because they WANT to. That said, there are worse places one could end up.

The Brady Arts District

Blue Dome

Tulsa Pride | A weekend of Pride, June 1st and 2nd 2013.

Brookside - The Place To Be

Tulsa Riverview Neighborhood

Tulsa gets a bad rap but for a city of 1 million in the buckle of the Bible belt, it's really not that bad, when compared to most of the surrounding area. Keep in mind "not that bad" is relatively speaking.
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Old 12-01-2012, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Tulsa, OK
2,572 posts, read 3,525,380 times
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I'm kind of late posting on this thread, but I live in Tulsa. I felt I had to step in because I was seeing a lot of miss information. First of all Oklahoma is not the featureless flat landscape that most outsiders think it is. Instead of me boring you with a bunch of fluff you can look it up on Wikipedia. Were not the PNW but were not Kansas either....Sorry if your from Kansas. Tulsa gets 42.4 inches of rain a year and Portland gets 36 inches, Tulsa is Sunny 62% compared to Portland 48%.

But I have seen a few on here make it sound like "Our ideal of a good time" is going out to a good old fashion book burning or watching BS Mountain all day long. Yes, Oklahoma and Tulsa are very red states but the same could be said about most of the other Southern States. But maybe we are not as red as it seems. The bible thumping, backward red necks in our state vote. And I mean they vote as if their life depends on it! It has been drilled into their pointed little heads that their religion and right to bear arm is under attack by our muslim president. Their words, most certainly not mine.

Every year at our gay pride parade there are several tables set up for voter registration. It amazes me how many gay folks from all age groups are not even registered to vote. And when it comes election day I will call some of my buds and ask if they are going to vote today? And they always have some lame excuse to why they can't vote or some bs. But these churches all have buses and they drive around picking up their sheeple so they can vote. Now I'm not saying that we are not conservative but maybe we are not as conservative as most think we are. We do have an openly gay state representative from OKC.

We have 3 pretty large casinos in Tulsa, one of them being a Hard Rock Casino. Their parking lots are packed even on Sunday. We have the 2nd largest gay pride center in the US. The largest Unitarian Church in the nation. We have a very active club and restaurant scene on Brookside, Cherry Street, Blue Dome and Brady district. Its not all church here. RT 66 Runs right through our city.

For the poor guy who was trapped in his hotel, it sounds like he was staying in the DoubleTree. He could have called a cab and gone to Blue Dome district or the Brady district. Only 5 blocks away. Or could have gone one mile to Cherry Street area and a few mile farther to Brookside. Or next time stay at the Crown Plaza which is two blocks from both Blue Dome and Brady district. Or he could have ask the Hotel Concierge where to go.

And we have a very clean and pretty city. Midtown Tulsa is where all the old Oil money is. It goes on for miles and miles. Tree lined streets that are very walkable. Stately homes. Fine dinning and shopping. Remember for over 60 years Tulsa was the Oil Capital of the World. We was and still are a little money town. South Tulsa is the new area, thats were you will find the malls and big box stores, and there is also some very impressive wealth there.

And for a city our size we have a very impressive skyline. And our downtown is full of Art Deco buildings, which a lot of them are being converted into apartments. Remember Oil was gushing out of the when Tulsa was booming in the 20s and 30s and Art Deco was the rave then.

Tulsa not perfect and is not for everyone, but it not also the ugly backwards Hicksville that some have painted it to be.

Last edited by okie1962; 12-01-2012 at 07:38 PM.. Reason: spelling
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Old 12-01-2012, 09:56 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,048,482 times
Reputation: 4482
Quote:
Originally Posted by okie1962 View Post
I'm kind of late posting on this thread, but I live in Tulsa. I felt I had to step in because I was seeing a lot of miss information. First of all Oklahoma is not the featureless flat landscape that most outsiders think it is. Instead of me boring you with a bunch of fluff you can look it up on Wikipedia. Were not the PNW but were not Kansas either....Sorry if your from Kansas. Tulsa gets 42.4 inches of rain a year and Portland gets 36 inches, Tulsa is Sunny 62% compared to Portland 48%.

But I have seen a few on here make it sound like "Our ideal of a good time" is going out to a good old fashion book burning or watching BS Mountain all day long. Yes, Oklahoma and Tulsa are very red states but the same could be said about most of the other Southern States. But maybe we are not as red as it seems. The bible thumping, backward red necks in our state vote. And I mean they vote as if their life depends on it! It has been drilled into their pointed little heads that their religion and right to bear arm is under attack by our muslim president. Their words, most certainly not mine.

Every year at our gay pride parade there are several tables set up for voter registration. It amazes me how many gay folks from all age groups are not even registered to vote. And when it comes election day I will call some of my buds and ask if they are going to vote today? And they always have some lame excuse to why they can't vote or some bs. But these churches all have buses and they drive around picking up their sheeple so they can vote. Now I'm not saying that we are not conservative but maybe we are not as conservative as most think we are. We do have an openly gay state representative from OKC.

We have 3 pretty large casinos in Tulsa, one of them being a Hard Rock Casino. Their parking lots are packed even on Sunday. We have the 2nd largest gay pride center in the US. The largest Unitarian Church in the nation. We have a very active club and restaurant scene on Brookside, Cherry Street, Blue Dome and Brady district. Its not all church here. RT 66 Runs right through our city.

For the poor guy who was trapped in his hotel, it sounds like he was staying in the DoubleTree. He could have called a cab and gone to Blue Dome district or the Brady district. Only 5 blocks away. Or could have gone one mile to Cherry Street area and a few mile farther to Brookside. Or next time stay at the Crown Plaza which is two blocks from both Blue Dome and Brady district. Or he could have ask the Hotel Concierge where to go.

And we have a very clean and pretty city. Midtown Tulsa is where all the old Oil money is. It goes on for miles and miles. Tree lined streets that are very walkable. Stately homes. Fine dinning and shopping. Remember for over 60 years Tulsa was the Oil Capital of the World. We was and still are a little money town. South Tulsa is the new area, thats were you will find the malls and big box stores, and there is also some very impressive wealth there.

And for a city our size we have a very impressive skyline. And our downtown is full of Art Deco buildings, which a lot of them are being converted into apartments. Remember Oil was gushing out of the when Tulsa was booming in the 20s and 30s and Art Deco was the rave then.

Tulsa not perfect and is not for everyone, but it not also the ugly backwards Hicksville that some have painted it to be.
Great post defending Tulsa.

It really all comes down to Portland currently being a media darling and a favorite for young people and Tulsa only getting national attention for something negative such as a right-wing politician saying something crazy. Hipsterdom is all the rage right now and Portland is a hipster capital. I still think Portland is a superior city but Tulsa isn't as bad as people make it seem.
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