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View Poll Results: Do you think Tulsa's a smale scale Portland?
Yes 12 10.00%
No 108 90.00%
Voters: 120. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-10-2012, 02:54 AM
 
Location: Pacific NW
6,413 posts, read 10,392,444 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
Most people who move to Portland end up underemployed and living in a small apartment with several roommates. It's the epitome of "occupy" culture. I have several high school and college classmates who moved to Portland or Seattle and its the same story.
"Most" people who move to Portland no doubt live normal, productive lives that you or I have no idea of. People described in your linked article are a small minority, mostly of people who choose to live that way. Not who are forced to.
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Old 12-10-2012, 10:12 AM
 
Location: The State Of California
9,470 posts, read 12,314,875 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThinkingElsewhere View Post
Lower COL, more sunshine, and some people prefer to live in smaller cities.

I'm a going on 61 years young young man and I like living in smaller cities to , but they have to somehow have the amenities that I require to satisfy my life style " Major League Sports Teams " and ( active outdoors with enough entertainment options )..
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Old 12-10-2012, 10:43 AM
 
Location: The State Of California
9,470 posts, read 12,314,875 times
Reputation: 3596
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mplsite View Post
It's not a coincidence that Portland is enjoying media attention and popular among younger people. It's not so about hipsters as it is about liberalism in general and quality of urban living. Portland offers high quality urban living, I'd argue, because it's so liberal. You can see this reflected in the built environment: there's much more fun and creative stuff to do, a live and let live attitude, they value mass transit, being healthy and smarter, not sitting inside all day at home or in a car, the list goes on. Liberalism dominates the local culture whereas in Tulsa it's a minority segment of the population.

This helps explain why, despite Tulsa having half the metro size of Portland it falls well below offering 1/2 of what the Portland metro does. It's not 100% perfect, but look at the urban amenities on Yelp for Portland vs Tulsa and you'll see that the gaps are so very large. Tulsa would need to triple its number of restaurants, add 6x as many bars, and add more than 12x the current retail just to offer half of what the Portland area does. It's hard to do that when the city has conservative anti-urban policies overall: the city doesn't promote urban development city-wide and good walkability, mass transit, and bikeability all of which contributes to why Portland offers so much and all of which is much more accessible.

Without lots of solid urban neighborhoods for such amenities to exist there's nowhere for such amenities to spread. Walkscore shows that urban Tulsa has 2/3 the population of Portland but only 16% of its urban neighborhoods are highly walkable: the area that most resembles anything in Portland, while Portland is 57% highly walkable citywide. That means for Tulsa to be considered a smaller Portland it would need to at least double its walkability, like now. Unless liberal Tulsans make huge strides very soon, the local culture has made it clear that most Tulsans don't share the same kind of values that Portland does. If anything, Tulsa is an anti-Portland stronghold.
SPOT ON....You Zing My Old Home Town A Good One...But to be honest I would like to see Tulsa somewhere in the middle of 2012 Tulsa OK...Portland OR

TripAdvisor is a better site than Yelp....
http://www.tripadvisor.com/

Yelp
http://www.yelp.com/berkeley
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Old 12-10-2012, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,048,482 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EnricoV View Post
"Most" people who move to Portland no doubt live normal, productive lives that you or I have no idea of. People described in your linked article are a small minority, mostly of people who choose to live that way. Not who are forced to.
I would say most fresh grads who pack up and move to Portland without a job end up underemployed. The smart ones who have a job lined up before they move are the ones living normal lives and are also more likely to stay more than a few years.
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Old 12-10-2012, 06:43 PM
 
Location: Pacific NW
6,413 posts, read 10,392,444 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
I would say most fresh grads who pack up and move to Portland without a job end up underemployed. The smart ones who have a job lined up before they move are the ones living normal lives and are also more likely to stay more than a few years.
Most "fresh grads" anywhere end up underemployed. But most "people" who move anywhere aren't "fresh grads."
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Old 12-10-2012, 07:19 PM
 
Location: IN
20,852 posts, read 35,964,992 times
Reputation: 13297
Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
I highly doubt there is a labor surplus in Tulsa. There is likely a labor shortage. Unemployment is very low and finding a job is much easier than it is in the trendy cities like Portland. When I lived in Little Rock, which is a city that suffers from many of the same things Tulsa suffers from (the lack of a "cool" factor), the company I worked with would say they had a difficult time finding people to hire because there wasn't enough local talent and people from elsewhere didn't want to move to Little Rock. They even offered a very competitive entry-level salary to try to entice college grads but living in Little Rock was a deal breaker for them. This was before the recession so people could be more picky but I doubt its changed too much now. Cities like Portland that have a ton of intelligent, capable, college educated young people moving there in droves from around the country without job prospects have a surplus which is why so many people end up underemployed. It's the same deal in Charlotte which enjoyed much of the media praise in the early and mid 2000s that Portland is getting now. For Millennials, I don't think job availability and salary is as much of a factor as wanting to live some place perceived as trendy and liberal.
The unemployment rate in Tulsa is a bit lower, but job growth is not impressive at all. Tulsa has very young demographics so lots of cheap labor for businesses, particularly manufacturing- considering Oklahoma is a RTW state. They advertise online and in Tulsa publications for a plethora of $8-14 an hour jobs, even for those that are well skilled. Medical positions are underpaid compared to the national average and I imagine that carries over into other fields.

"Cities like Portland that have a ton of intelligent, capable, college educated young people moving there in droves from around the country without job prospects have a surplus which is why so many people end up underemployed. "

I would investigate the reasons why the state of Oregon has not marketed the advantages of Portland for being a VC hotspot for new companies to make investments and grow based on the existing talent pool. The Bay Area is notorious for being a VC hub so they should expand in Oregon where taxes are less, no?

"When I lived in Little Rock, which is a city that suffers from many of the same things Tulsa suffers from (the lack of a "cool" factor),"

Much of that likely is the result of the "old guard" politicans not liking lots of change and being content with the status quo, minus some decent sized developments. Cities like Little Rock simply do not make much of an effort to attract the type of dynamic demographics that lead to strong growth. Little Rock is also the state capitol, so it has a sizable amount of state and govt positions.
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Old 12-10-2012, 09:47 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,048,482 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
The unemployment rate in Tulsa is a bit lower, but job growth is not impressive at all. Tulsa has very young demographics so lots of cheap labor for businesses, particularly manufacturing- considering Oklahoma is a RTW state. They advertise online and in Tulsa publications for a plethora of $8-14 an hour jobs, even for those that are well skilled. Medical positions are underpaid compared to the national average and I imagine that carries over into other fields.
Job Growth by Metropolitan Area | Department of Numbers

In October, Tulsa saw a 1.9% job growth rate from October 2011. While not stellar, it beats Portland's 0.93% job growth rate. Tulsa isn't doing as bad as a lot of people think. Oklahoma City, an hour down the turnpike, has had strong job growth in the past five years relatively speaking.

Per Salary.com, the median salary for a General Physician in Tulsa is $165,287. One can live very well on that in Tulsa given the cheap real estate. In Portland, the median salary for the same job is $175,460. Using a cost of living calculator, to have the same standard of living in Portland as one would have in Tulsa, they would need to make $216,332. Now there are other factors to consider such as amenities Portland offers that Tulsa doesn't, but when simply looking at cost of living, Tulsa wins.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
"Cities like Portland that have a ton of intelligent, capable, college educated young people moving there in droves from around the country without job prospects have a surplus which is why so many people end up underemployed. "

I would investigate the reasons why the state of Oregon has not marketed the advantages of Portland for being a VC hotspot for new companies to make investments and grow based on the existing talent pool. The Bay Area is notorious for being a VC hub so they should expand in Oregon where taxes are less, no?
I am not sure. The way business works, I would assume they would jump at the shot of expanding into Portland to take advantage of its popularity with the young and educated if they thought it was worth the investment. There may be other factors though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
"When I lived in Little Rock, which is a city that suffers from many of the same things Tulsa suffers from (the lack of a "cool" factor),"

Much of that likely is the result of the "old guard" politicans not liking lots of change and being content with the status quo, minus some decent sized developments. Cities like Little Rock simply do not make much of an effort to attract the type of dynamic demographics that lead to strong growth. Little Rock is also the state capitol, so it has a sizable amount of state and govt positions.
Agree here. Not only does Little Rock suffer from a negative national perception but the NIMBYs in the area fight every attempt to do something that would change it for the positive. The city recently demolished a beautiful historic 1950s theater downtown that could have been renovated into a theater showing indie/foreign films (young people would be all over that). A developer also proposed a W hotel and convention center for downtown but the NIMBYs fought that to the death and the site ended up becoming surface parking.

Tulsa has at least taken initiative with its "Vision 2025" project. It takes a while for perceptions to change but at least something is being done.

Oklahoma City has long been perceived as one of the worst cities over 1 million in the nation to live. In 1993 they passed the MAPS project to revitalize downtown and only recently because of the Thunder have people begun to take a second look at the city.

Last edited by bchris02; 12-10-2012 at 09:58 PM..
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Old 11-11-2014, 07:04 AM
 
Location: The State Of California
9,470 posts, read 12,314,875 times
Reputation: 3596
Default Tulsa OK Is A Retirement Age Portland

Tulsa OK is a repub-I-Can't Portland OR...

On the other hand Portland Oregon is a Demo-rat-cractic Portland OR.

Tulsa OK will finally get water in the Arkansas River within the next 10 years and look out World.

https://images.search.yahoo.com/imag...ck&fr2=piv-web

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ov4Mou4RGj8

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mc9BQpQtYoc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVsHFFRSg84

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=20pmuaKekPY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cIKvvvtQRmo

Last edited by Howest2008; 11-11-2014 at 07:14 AM..
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