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Old 11-10-2012, 06:54 PM
Status: "could've~would've~should've used 'have', not 'of'" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,463 posts, read 14,307,686 times
Reputation: 23228

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Yep, alive and well in Memphis and most other parts of TN from what I can tell.
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Old 11-10-2012, 07:07 PM
 
Location: One of the 13 original colonies.
10,162 posts, read 6,488,427 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
It's still common, and still viewed by most as a positive form of courtesy. Of course, we live in a mobile, global society, so it's usage is lessening rather than remaining constant or increasing.

Personally, I like it. My four children are now grown, and two have kids of their own. They are teaching them to use those terms as well.

Also, many military families use those terms, regardless of where they are from or where they are stationed.

Exactly. It is nice to know that some are still raised with good manners. We have lost and are still losing so much in this country. It actually is sad to see people look down on having good manners.
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Old 11-11-2012, 10:17 AM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
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I lived in TN for 32 years and almost never heard children say that, even when I was a child.
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Old 11-11-2012, 02:22 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,798,386 times
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Where I come from, a lot of kids would get lambasted for not saying it.

"Did you clean up your room?"
"Yes."
"Yes-WHAT?!"
"Yes, ma'am!"

...and if an adult calls for you, don't even dream of replying "what?" or "huh?".
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Old 11-11-2012, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,513 posts, read 9,049,534 times
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Lived in Mississippi for over 2 years. "Yes ma'am" and "Yes sir" are very common amongst African Americans (I am caucasian), unless you're talking with a hood rat African American who thinks I am out to oppress his rights and must be rude to me. I would say it's still common amongst whites too.

Besides just that, people in the south are in a completely different mentality than those elsewhere in the country. It's a much slower and easier going mind set, drive slow, work slow, talk slow, take time to talk to people, even complete strangers they will chit chat with. Mississippi has the most churches per capita of any state in the country, and you best believe that nearly EVERYONE is out Sunday morning at Church, all dressed up too in suits or dress slacks.
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Old 11-11-2012, 02:44 PM
Status: "could've~would've~should've used 'have', not 'of'" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,463 posts, read 14,307,686 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamplight View Post
I lived in TN for 32 years and almost never heard children say that, even when I was a child.
Your teachers, principals, bus drivers, coaches, Sunday school ladies, crotchety old neighbor down the street didn't require that?
My kids are younger than you and it was pretty standard for all the kids we knew to address nearly any adult as ma'am or sir, especially the elementary school teachers. I work with a lot of young twenty somethings and it's a part of their everyday vocabulary around here too.
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Old 11-11-2012, 02:49 PM
 
2,096 posts, read 3,848,843 times
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I think people overrate how much regional cultures are fading. In some ways I'd actually say they're growing stronger again. I think Southern culture is in many ways gaining ground and not dying. Rural people from all over the US seem to identify with it more and more.

It's not like everywhere is turning into Santa Monica now that we have the Internet. Don't you think TV would have done that already, it's been 60 years since it got popular. The Internet actually decentralized the media and thus makes regionalism ironically more relevant.
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Old 11-11-2012, 04:05 PM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
9,745 posts, read 14,179,292 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
Your teachers, principals, bus drivers, coaches, Sunday school ladies, crotchety old neighbor down the street didn't require that?
My kids are younger than you and it was pretty standard for all the kids we knew to address nearly any adult as ma'am or sir, especially the elementary school teachers. I work with a lot of young twenty somethings and it's a part of their everyday vocabulary around here too.
I heard it occasionally, and certainly more so when I was a kid (in the 80s), but I wouldn't say it was the norm then and it was definitely uncommon by the time I moved away. I'd hear adults address each other as "sir" or "ma'am" frequently in a business setting, but almost never children. Maybe if I had lived in a much smaller town my experience would have been different. In fact I did work in a small town of 3000 for a couple of years, but I wasn't around children very much there so I couldn't really say how they acted.

Most of the twenty-somethings I knew responded to adults with a dazed, "Do what?" in between text messages on their phones.
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Old 11-11-2012, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Rockwall
678 posts, read 1,299,026 times
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I didn't realize respect for ones elders ended when one was past the young adult stage of life. lol

I say 'yes ma'am' 'no sir' to my mother, father-in-law and others in the 'elder' category. And I'm an adult with adult children! My son thought his great-grandmothers name was ma'am because he heard me say it so much!

I still see it a lot where we live.


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Old 11-11-2012, 04:46 PM
 
13,161 posts, read 20,780,088 times
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Despite not moving to the south until they reached high school age, my sons very quickly learned that sir and ma'am were expected addresses here in GA.
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