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Old 11-28-2012, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Fishers, IN
6,495 posts, read 10,798,327 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by northbound74 View Post
Not saying this as an insult to the south, but I don't buy into this notion that they have the market cornered on politeness and hospitality.
Agree 100% on this point.
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Old 11-29-2012, 08:52 AM
 
640 posts, read 1,028,512 times
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In New Orleans, most people I know were somewhat taught to say Yes m'am and yes sir. But, atleast for me my parents never enforced it as much as previous generations. It was kind of just like when we would meet and elderly person or something my dad would tell me to say yes sir.

Isn't that pretty basic though for any young person growing up in general, to respect older people??
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Old 11-29-2012, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
3,737 posts, read 3,848,110 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
LOL Bet you all's interactions with one another are something to be a source of pride and used as an example for the next generation, huh?
I think its just some people have different mentality. I know many people here might even be offended if you say "yes sir" or "yes ma'am" to them. Perhaps it is hard to understand for you, but in some areas of the country respect is something that has to be earned, not something you automatically gain with old age. You may come across as "fake" or "dishonest" if you show respect to a complete stranger who didn't do anything to gain your respect in the first place. It has nothing to do with having good manners, just difference in culture.
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Old 11-20-2013, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Tupelo, Mississippi
80 posts, read 152,709 times
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I have lived my entire life in Mississippi and I don't say "Yes, ma'am" or "Yes, sir". The younger generation doesn't do it often compared to the older generations.

My grandfather is big on that. My dad does it sometime. Mom is from Illinois so she never does it. LOL
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Old 11-20-2013, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
2,343 posts, read 2,750,537 times
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I'm 45 years old, grew up in Houston, and the only kids I knew from my generation who said that were military brats. I know the older generations (older than mine) were brought up to say it, but by the time my generation was coming of age, we weren't really saying "sir" or "ma'am" too much... unless we were being pulled over by the cops.
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Old 11-20-2013, 01:48 PM
 
985 posts, read 1,086,608 times
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I'm from Houston and I was always taught to say yes sir/ma'm as was most people I know. I'm in my 30s now and I still use the terms when talking to older people. I haven't seen a drastic change in the way kids today address elders.
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Old 11-20-2013, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
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I heard that a few times in the South and think that is such an endearing quality. I wish it children everywhere were taught to be like that.
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Old 11-20-2013, 02:00 PM
 
Location: southern california
55,660 posts, read 74,595,623 times
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i still say it and im on the coast and am 65. basic manners is not out of fashion it just makes all the ugly mouthed people look bad.
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Old 11-08-2014, 06:44 AM
 
381 posts, read 412,749 times
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Default Yes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by xboxmas View Post
Besides Florida, I haven't been to the south-are kids down there still taught to say it, or is it becoming less and less common? What areas is it the most common in?
Yes, my fiancé from Virginia uses it sometimes and it makes me feel uncomfortable. It is not natural for me to hear someone working the counter at the local supermarket called ma'am. Not saying you can't be nice but ma'am is just way too formal.

Example: you are at the DMV and they ask you a yes or no question. . . and the response is 'yes ma'am.'

The gal at subway isn't my priest...she isn't a judge...I was in the military. The only person I call sir is a superior officer. If you say it to someone below you it puts you in a weaker position...but like I said, the local's love it when you say it because it makes them feel important. You can be just as nice to someone by treating them with respect...the sir ma'am thing is way too much IMHO and doesn't indicate you are being respectful.

Last edited by VT'ah; 11-08-2014 at 07:00 AM..
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Old 11-08-2014, 06:59 AM
 
381 posts, read 412,749 times
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Default reply

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gantz View Post
I think its just some people have different mentality. I know many people here might even be offended if you say "yes sir" or "yes ma'am" to them. Perhaps it is hard to understand for you, but in some areas of the country respect is something that has to be earned, not something you automatically gain with old age. You may come across as "fake" or "dishonest" if you show respect to a complete stranger who didn't do anything to gain your respect in the first place. It has nothing to do with having good manners, just difference in culture.
I see you are in NYC. The parents down here will scold their kids in public if they don't call the dude at petsmart 'sir' for asking them if they want a lollypop. Different culture...
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