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Old 11-18-2012, 09:42 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saintmarks View Post
Best definition on the thread. There are some further nuances that could be pulled out... like the part of Florida south of Orlando... the most southern portion of all on the map but probably the least southern of any area in the South culturally speaking. At least on the main population centers on the coasts.

Texas always stirs up a discussion on its southerness, but it is one of the original confederate states, most of the early settlers came from the south, the accent, the cuisine, the bible belt... all things very southern. But there is a pretty big difference east to west to south in Texas. The western half is very ranch oriented but probably the only part that should be lumped in with southern plains. East Texas is a south as you can get. From north of Houston and East of Dallas, it is very much like the rest of the south eastward... Louisiana (northern at least), MS, AL, GA.... The Rio Grande Valley has a climate almost like southern Florida and the Hispanic infulence gives it another similarity to S. Florida, so it really is a region unto its own.

Far eastern New Mexico (Clovis/Hobbes/Portales and environs) is very much like west Texas and has a distinct southern flair down to the accent, cuisine, and preponderance of the Southern Baptist denomination. So any map of the south should dip into this part of NM.
The South has become such a diverse region in the past few years that I don't see the need to single out diverse areas as "unsouthern" anymore. Yes South Florida has a strong Latin culture mixed with the southern culture, but there are other large areas of the South that are very diverse as well. Texas is very Mexican, but do we need to separate it for that reason? Whatever the differences in culture, they are all part of the southern U.S. in my opinion.
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Old 11-18-2012, 01:50 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BTA88 View Post
Maryland and Delaware removed from the south, placed in Mid Atlantic/Northeast. Then it gets complicated... Virginia, Georgia and Florida together. West Virginia, North/South Carolina, Tennessee and Kentucky together. Alabama, Louisiana, Arkansas and Mississippi together. Texas and Oklahoma to the plains states. Missouri to the Midwest.
Sorry ain't gonna happen no matter how much people from the deep south hates the state of Maryland......
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Old 11-18-2012, 01:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I'minformed2 View Post
Waaaaaay off. The Carolinas, at least NC, is generally way more closely tied to Virginia and Georgia than Tennessee, Kentucky, or especially WVA.

Maryland/Delaware/Wva and some of Virginia is "tidewater/mid atlantic" (but really most of MD and DE are more tied to the Northeast).... most of Virginia, NC, SC, GA, and FL is " Southeast" or "South Atlantic"..... Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, "south central/mid south".....Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana "Deep South" (this often includes GA and SC as well but it's flexible)....Eastern half of TX and OK are "Southern Planes".

Obviously some of these states blend into one another and other regional identifiers along boarders...but this is how I would generally categorize them.


And yes to the above poster, it looks like the OP took a map showing the confederate states (Before WVA split from VA to re-join the Union) in red and the slave states that remained loyal to the union in stripes.
Maryland Eastern Shore and Delaware is more in line with Virginia Tidewater and Eastern Carolinas and Eastern Georgia........
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Old 11-18-2012, 01:54 PM
 
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Originally Posted by po-boy View Post
I actually think the regions of the South match up very poorly with state boundaries. Most southern states are divided into several different regions. IMO, it goes something like this:

Atlantic South: the eastern portions (i.e. those near the Atlantic coast) of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Florida. Characterized by an ocean culture and the importance of shipping. Think of places like Norfolk/Va Beach, Charleston, Savannah, and Jacksonville.

Piedmont: the middle portions of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia. A lot of the 1-85 corridor. Cities like Atlanta, Charlotte, Raleigh. Probably the fastest growing part of the south.

Appalachia: The mountainous western parts of Virginia and north Carolina and eastern Tennessee. Maybe some of north Georgia. I don't consider West Virginia southern, but if you did it would be included in this region. It is less developed, more rugged.

Mid-South: Most of Tenn, Kentucky, Arkansas. Maybe the very northern part of Alabama.

Deep South: The "heart" of the south. This contains most of the states of Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana. This is what most people think of when they think of the south. Montgomery, Jackson, places like that.

Gulf South: the parts of the south near the Gulf coast: the Florida panhandle, Mobile, Gulfport, Southern Lousiana, and some of southeastern Texas. The Gulf of Mexico is the primary identifier of this region. There is much importance placed on fishing, oysters, the oil industry, and the beaches/tourism.
Nah, not correct......
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Old 11-18-2012, 01:56 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
Here is just about as good as any map of the "boundaries" of the South (north to south, east to west), that I have ever seen. It is based upon where "Southern American English" is spoken.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...EnglishMap.jpg
It is an estimate but still off.......
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Old 11-18-2012, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by $mk8795 View Post
Maryland Eastern Shore and Delaware is more in line with Virginia Tidewater and Eastern Carolinas and Eastern Georgia........
Interesting how you would still group Maryland and Delaware with Virgina tidewater, Eastern Carolinas, and Eastern Georgia a one division in the south. You don't think Maryland and Delaware are distinctive enough to have there own region in the South?
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Old 11-18-2012, 02:33 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by $mk8795 View Post
Sorry ain't gonna happen no matter how much people from the deep south hates the state of Maryland......
The problem is, they were during the Civil War and continue to be culturally split between the south and the Northeast. Pennsylvania is similar, despite having Pittsburgh and Philadelphia, that's why I think they should be considered Mid Atlantic rather than Southern.
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Old 11-18-2012, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeTarheel View Post
The South has become such a diverse region in the past few years that I don't see the need to single out diverse areas as "unsouthern" anymore. Yes South Florida has a strong Latin culture mixed with the southern culture, but there are other large areas of the South that are very diverse as well. Texas is very Mexican, but do we need to separate it for that reason? Whatever the differences in culture, they are all part of the southern U.S. in my opinion.
Granted there is a diversity. But southern Florida is so full of people of all nationalities, even American itself that are not native southerners that it is difficult to feel you are still in the south in these areas. Now go inland to towns like Wauchulla, Belle Glade, Sebring, Bartow, etc and you will find these areas more southern.
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Old 11-18-2012, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
Here is just about as good as any map of the "boundaries" of the South (north to south, east to west), that I have ever seen. It is based upon where "Southern American English" is spoken.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...EnglishMap.jpg
Reb, I think I have seen this map from another thread and you probably posted it there too. Excellent. It even has the eastern portion of NM included. The only glaring deletion I would change... the line for Florida should be further south, or if not further south, then a peninsula within the peninsula... a finger of southern dialect extending further south but away from the coasts.
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Old 11-18-2012, 08:37 PM
 
Location: SW Pennsylvania
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
Here is just about as good as any map of the "boundaries" of the South (north to south, east to west), that I have ever seen. It is based upon where "Southern American English" is spoken.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...EnglishMap.jpg
As someone from West Virginia, that accent map is pretty accurate. I from the northern tip of the southern accent map. In northern WV, you will hear southern accents mixed in with more midland sounding accents because there many people from other parts of WV in that part of the state. A native of northern WV sounds a lot like southwestern PA.

When I moved from Clarksburg, WV to the Washington, PA area, I found the accents to be almost identical but the PA accent sounds a little more northern, if that makes sense. When I am in Charleston, WV, or further south into WV, I sometimes have a hard time understanding the natives.
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