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Old 10-12-2007, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
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Default What was your city like 100 years ago?

If you could go back in time 100 years ago, what would your city have looked like? How big was it? What would the population demographics have looked like? What were the main industries? Did your city even exist a century ago?
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Old 10-12-2007, 03:02 PM
 
Location: AZ
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Chicago was founded in the 1770s, so it was around waaaaay more than 100 years ago. The population in 1900 was around 1.7 million.

Here are 2 pictures of Chicago in the early 1900's. It was still big and just as impressive as it is today, just on a smaller scale.
Image:StateStreetc1907.jpg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Image:Chicago City Hall.jpg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 10-12-2007, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Mableton, GA USA (NW Atlanta suburb, 4 miles OTP)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vegaspilgrim View Post
If you could go back in time 100 years ago, what would your city have looked like? How big was it? What would the population demographics have looked like? What were the main industries? Did your city even exist a century ago?
Atlanta, GA was formally incorporated on December 29, 1847, and it was fairly large in 1907.

Here's a picture of Peachtree Street in 1907, and here's a map of Atlanta in 1919.

The city of Atlanta proper had a population of 154,839 in 1910, and the Atlanta metro had a population of 522,442.
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Old 10-12-2007, 03:19 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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100 years ago, St. Louis was one of the largest cities in the nation and booming in every possible way. Having just hosted the 1904 World's Fair and the Olympics, St. Louis had an opportunity to surpass Chicago and become king of the Midwest. Sadly, the political fathers refused to let that happen, and Chicago overtook St. Louis. St. Louis was the largest city west of Pittsburgh for many, many years. The city back then had a population of around 900,000 people.
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Old 10-12-2007, 03:25 PM
 
Location: yeah
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rebuilding after the quake
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Old 10-12-2007, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
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Phoenix 100 years ago was a small desert farm town, a regional trade and distribution center for agriculture in the Salt River Valley of central Arizona. Population was 11,314 in 1910. Now that's small! It was also the territorial capital. Arizona wasn't even a state yet, and the Roosevelt Dam which allowed mass agriculture and settlement wasn't built yet. Here's a picture Wikipedia provides of Phoenix in 1908.

Today, the city of Phoenix has 1.5 million people, and the greater Phoenix metro area has 4 million people. I'm not sure if that's cool, scary, or both.
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Old 10-12-2007, 03:38 PM
 
Location: AZ
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Too bad Phoenix didnt stay that way! lol I could handle Phoenix (minus the summer) if it still looked like that. What the heck happened? hahaha
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Old 10-12-2007, 03:40 PM
 
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My neighborhood looks pretty much like it did 100 years ago
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Old 10-12-2007, 04:44 PM
 
Location: Midessa, Texas Home Yangzhou, Jiangsu temporarily
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Old 10-12-2007, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
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100 years ago there was nothing here but farmland and a brewery.

150 years ago the civil war swept through. My neighborhood is right on the Potomac at an easy place to cross, so my neighborhood had its share of escaping soldiers (and even a few slaves) making the crossing to the north. They still find artifacts from escaping soldiers from time to time.

The Potomac is narrow here--when the ice is thick or the water is low you can easily cross it. I often look at the houses across the way and think about the fact that before the civil war, there was a thriving ferry and businesses on both sides of the river owned by brothers from the same family. Amazing to think that of that family being torn apart by war.

After the civil war, this area fell into hard times. Nothing much happened until the late 1980's. Then, suddenly, thousands of houses, shopping malls, and office buildings sprung up.
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