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View Poll Results: Is the western US overall more cold or warm?
Most of the western US is what I'd consider cold, but parts of it are warm 14 46.67%
Most of the western US is what I'd consider warm, but parts of it are cold 16 53.33%
Voters: 30. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 11-17-2012, 01:13 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by portlanderinOC View Post
Even in the "cold" areas of the west, it's still quite mild compared to the east coast. Plus it's dry, which makes it easier to handle the cold or heat.
Some people have this idea that places like Colorado are as cold as Siberia much of the year (although Alamosa and Gunnison come close), but Denver doesn't get as cold as Chicago or even New York.
Coldest Places in United States - Current Results

If you take a look at the locations with the lowest average annual temperature, 19 out of 20 are in the Western US.
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Old 11-17-2012, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Detroit
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sizzle-Chest View Post
Coldest Places in United States - Current Results

If you take a look at the locations with the lowest average annual temperature, 19 out of 20 are in the Western US.
That's most likely because they don't get as hot in the summer as places in the midwest and they are less humid, so there is more of a difference between the highs and lows.
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Old 11-17-2012, 04:00 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RC01 View Post
That's most likely because they don't get as hot in the summer as places in the midwest and they are less humid, so there is more of a difference between the highs and lows.
Hottest Cities in United States - Current Results

Lot of Western cities listed, but nothing from the Midwest.
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Old 11-17-2012, 04:25 PM
 
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The dryness and elevation contribute to much of the Western U.S. being capable of extreme winter temperatures. But that dryness and sunshine also allows its winter highs to get somewhat warmer than they would in the east, where the moisture in the air also keeps the highs down (as well as keeping the lows up, on average).

That dryness also lets certain locations get some pretty hot summer days, as the air just heats up quicker, while the summer lows still get fairly cool (50s-60s).

So on any given day, winter or summer, there can be huge variations between the high and the low. Saw a location in Wyoming with a forecast for a day this week with a high of 50 and low of -3, on the same day! That's something you won't see back east.

But overall as a region, temperature depends far too much on elevation (and latitude) to really classify it as hot or cold.
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Old 11-17-2012, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Detroit
983 posts, read 1,428,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sizzle-Chest View Post
Hottest Cities in United States - Current Results

Lot of Western cities listed, but nothing from the Midwest.
And not in remotely the same area
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Old 11-17-2012, 08:18 PM
 
5,265 posts, read 14,900,687 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by portlanderinOC View Post
Even in the "cold" areas of the west, it's still quite mild compared to the east coast. Plus it's dry, which makes it easier to handle the cold or heat.
Some people have this idea that places like Colorado are as cold as Siberia much of the year (although Alamosa and Gunnison come close), but Denver doesn't get as cold as Chicago or even New York.

Again, not true....read the above comments with the numbers. Denver gets much colder than New York. Chicago is a different story.
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Old 11-18-2012, 12:22 AM
 
Location: Keizer, OR
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I'minformed2 View Post
Again, not true....read the above comments with the numbers. Denver gets much colder than New York. Chicago is a different story.
Denver's average high in January is 43, compared to New York's 37. Also Denver is drier therefore it doesn't feel as cold anyway.
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Old 11-18-2012, 11:22 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by portlanderinOC View Post
Denver's average high in January is 43, compared to New York's 37. Also Denver is drier therefore it doesn't feel as cold anyway.
Again, compare the lows as well. But I don't think too many people would argue that Denver is one of the colder western cities. Comparatively, it's relatively mild.
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Old 11-19-2012, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Phoenix Arizona
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Most of the West is too damn cold, most of the world is too damn cold. If you're in a place where it's chilly at night in the summer, it's too damn cold there.
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Old 11-19-2012, 09:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by portlanderinOC View Post
Denver's average high in January is 43, compared to New York's 37. Also Denver is drier therefore it doesn't feel as cold anyway.
Averages highs are not the whole picture....especially in winter. Typically winter-time high temperatures only last for MAYBE 2 hours in the early afternoon and then drop pretty quickly and, in the case of Denver compared to the East Coast cities...much lower. Denver's average high January temperature may be a little higher than NYC's...but the low temperature (which lasts a lot longer than the high temperature) is lower.
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