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Old 11-18-2012, 01:02 PM
 
31 posts, read 52,052 times
Reputation: 13

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I graduated college in June with a BS in Business - Marketing and Finance and a BA Economics. I've been trying the NYC scene since August looking for jobs, with the mindset that all the marketing firms = lots of opportunities...but really means they want free labor from interns, and entry-level positions (AC, Assistant AE) require 2+ years of experience.

I would keep staying, but its just too expensive. It seems that the only job growth in NYC is for 100k+ jobs or $8-10/hr part-time positions, which is unsustainable for NYC. Even living with my parents, I still pick up the tab for overpriced food and car insurance for interview driving purposes, which is $6k per year.

So, I'm considering moving out upstate...possibly Pittsburgh, since the cost of living is MUCH cheaper, possibly more job opportunities, no 1+ and hr subway commutes, and lower wage jobs that hire full-time (mostly hotel front desk) . I went to UB, so I know most of these areas (Buffalo, Rochester).

My idea with Pittsburgh is that its drive-able to all the areas within the Midwest, and also apply for positions using my parents address in the city/Boston.

Is this a decent plan? Are there particular cities that are better suited for entry-level work? Thanks for the advice!
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Old 11-18-2012, 01:12 PM
 
Location: Atlanta & NYC
6,620 posts, read 11,688,311 times
Reputation: 6603
indeed.com

Type in what job you're looking for a leave the city field blank.

Apply to all jobs that are in cities of decent sizes.

Don't move without a job.

Your biggest thing right now should be to get a job and support yourself. Two degrees brings on a lot of debt and you need to start paying it down.
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Old 11-18-2012, 05:57 PM
 
56,755 posts, read 81,102,256 times
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This should help too: Central New York Jobs

Rochester NY apartments, Buffalo apartments, Syracuse apartments, Albany NY apartments listings from The Renters Guide
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Old 11-19-2012, 05:58 AM
 
21,220 posts, read 30,443,839 times
Reputation: 19674
You might also consider Nashville. It has a sizable presence of marketing firms thanks to the huge presence of the music industry (and supporting industries), has a very low unemployment rate (just over 6%) and is a growing vibrant city with a reasonable cost of living (no state or local income taxes) and not overbuilt/sprawling.


Nashville Music City - YouTube
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Old 11-19-2012, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Mt. Airy
5,311 posts, read 5,342,346 times
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Pittsburgh's a good choice IMO. Lots of jobs, nice vibrant, walkable city. I think the next decade in Pittsburgh will be very positive and it's the size of city that's great for starting your career, because it's affordable with lots of amenities.

I think you're doing the right thing; it's what I did to get to where I am. Good luck!
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Old 11-19-2012, 10:20 AM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,060,954 times
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Oklahoma City has a very low unemployment rate and decent job market. It was 4.0% even earlier this year and it's a metro of 1.3 million. You would have to make some compromises though and that's what keeps a lot of young professionals away. Its a conservative, car centric city that is very family oriented. There are liberal, walkable pockets popular with the artsy and hipster types but they are relatively small compared to what you might expect in a city it's size. If you can deal with that, there are few places with better economic prospects right now than OKC.
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Old 11-19-2012, 11:46 AM
 
31 posts, read 52,052 times
Reputation: 13
Quote:
Try indeed.com

Type in what job you're looking for a leave the city field blank.

Apply to all jobs that are in cities of decent sizes.

Don't move without a job.

Your biggest thing right now should be to get a job and support yourself. Two degrees brings on a lot of debt and you need to start paying it down.
I've been using Indeed for over 3 months to no avail. All the positions I've applied for, although 'entry-level', require intermediate experience due to high demand. Jobs I've applied for that are too far from my address have been immediately rejected.

The plus side of being a partial minority going to a cheap public university (before they doubled tuition) and having parents with low wages means I practically went to college for free. Luckily, I have no debt on my hands...except an unpaid parking ticket I refuse to pay because I paid for the meter.


Quote:
You might also consider Nashville....Oklahoma City
I heard the South has been growing fast, but its really too far to reach. I don't think its wise to move until I have a job, but honestly I have no idea. I'm just afraid of staying somewhere, paying rent, and having no way in paying it off. For now, I'm staying with a friend that lives an hour from both Rochester and Syracuse, 2 hours from Buffalo, and 5 hours from Pitt, so I'm close enough to apply for low-end work and get something quickly.


Quote:
Pittsburgh's a good choice IMO. Lots of jobs, nice vibrant, walkable city. I think the next decade in Pittsburgh will be very positive and it's the size of city that's great for starting your career, because it's affordable with lots of amenities.
After college, I took a trip with my parents to Pittsburgh. We were suprised how many things they were to do, while all being so close. Plus, it really looks beautiful being on a valley surrounded by mountains.


I've been surprised honestly how everyone I've been talking to (including my parents) have been thinking my plan makes logical sense. I personally thought it was very crackpot. Thanks a lot for any advice!
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Old 11-21-2012, 06:48 AM
 
21,220 posts, read 30,443,839 times
Reputation: 19674
[quote=mozzillameister;27015817]
I heard the South has been growing fast, but its really too far to reach. I don't think its wise to move until I have a job, but honestly I have no idea. I'm just afraid of staying somewhere, paying rent, and having no way in paying it off. For now, I'm staying with a friend that lives an hour from both Rochester and Syracuse, 2 hours from Buffalo, and 5 hours from Pitt, so I'm close enough to apply for low-end work and get something quickly. /QUOTE]

Actually I'm afraid it doesn't make a whole lot of sense. Americans need to figure out that in order to get the jobs we want we're going to need to most likely redistribute ourselves geographically into the new economy which is away from the traditional population centers to where the growth is taking place now....examples being cities such as Nashville, Omaha, Salt Lake City, Oklahoma City, Minneapolis/St Paul and Des Moines to name a few. Otherwise the alternative is most likely to take a low wage job and compete over and over again with a large pool of applicants for the diminished number of higher-paying jobs in the more "traditional cities".
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Old 11-28-2012, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
216 posts, read 361,086 times
Reputation: 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post

Actually I'm afraid it doesn't make a whole lot of sense. Americans need to figure out that in order to get the jobs we want we're going to need to most likely redistribute ourselves geographically into the new economy which is away from the traditional population centers to where the growth is taking place now....examples being cities such as Nashville, Omaha, Salt Lake City, Oklahoma City, Minneapolis/St Paul and Des Moines to name a few. Otherwise the alternative is most likely to take a low wage job and compete over and over again with a large pool of applicants for the diminished number of higher-paying jobs in the more "traditional cities".
This is very good advice.
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Old 11-28-2012, 11:49 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,060,954 times
Reputation: 4482
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
Actually I'm afraid it doesn't make a whole lot of sense. Americans need to figure out that in order to get the jobs we want we're going to need to most likely redistribute ourselves geographically into the new economy which is away from the traditional population centers to where the growth is taking place now....examples being cities such as Nashville, Omaha, Salt Lake City, Oklahoma City, Minneapolis/St Paul and Des Moines to name a few. Otherwise the alternative is most likely to take a low wage job and compete over and over again with a large pool of applicants for the diminished number of higher-paying jobs in the more "traditional cities".
Agreed. Most of the best cities for employment right now are not the "hip" cities for young people, one exception being the Minneapolis/St Paul. The trendy cities on the east and west coast are tough markets right now and even cities like Austin that have low unemployment have extremely stiff competition in the job market. It really comes down to what a person's priorities are and what makes them happy.
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