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Old 01-22-2013, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
432 posts, read 482,635 times
Reputation: 303

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Quote:
Originally Posted by brewcrew1000 View Post
^I never said it was a bad thing but there has to be some kind of balance because your just shifting the poor to someplace else. A yuppie doesn't want to see a bum taking a **** on the sidewalk, he wants to see his french poodle doing that. A yuppie doesn't want to see a Single mama with her 7 kids walking down the street, he wants to see a Dog Walker walking 7 dogs down the street.
As a yuppie, I wouldn't give a crap if it was a baby mom with 20 kids walking down the street. Doesn't matter or mess with me. Infact I also have no problem with the homeless. Rarely homeless take ****s on the side of the road. About 2% of them do that. The others are just regular people just like me and you. Just without a crib.
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Old 01-22-2013, 03:43 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,655,251 times
Reputation: 35449
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimrob 1 View Post
You described the Pearl District in Portland, Oregon to the T. High end condos and Whole Foods amongst tons of other high end shops. More businesses geared for peoples dogs, than for the senior citizen or lower income worker living there. Young people by the droves moving in and out for whatever reason. Those that are forced into subsidized housing with these expensive shops across the street from them.( The subsidized housing unfortunately is quite expensive for an employed person.) Basically nothing for the average joe or jane other than a subway in a section 8 bldg. That is across the street from million dollar condos. At least the penthouses. They sure as hell are not going to put in a dollar store in these kind of high and mighty neighborhoods. God forbid anyone paying top dollar to live in subsidized housing, would attract a dollar or discount store in the Pearl District. Strange thing this high and mighty neighborhood is where they put a sizeable percentage of subsidized housing. One of the largest senior bldgs in Portland borders the Pearl district and the downtrodden neighborhoods of homelessness.

I don't agree with these type of gentrification programs. At least Portland's definition of them. The last thing we need in America is more social and financial divide. Especially when it is done in such close in crammed in neighborhoods like that Pearl District in Portland. It all looks nice to the tourist, however the vibe when living there is. Segregation by class of people and incomes, from one side of the street to the other. I've never seen anything so bad on that level until living there. I saw the cost of rents and the purchase price of even the smallest studio, go up in price and then fall somewhat. However there is so many on the market you take a huge beating when selling it. I can attest to that one. I will never forget that place, and it will never happen to me in my life again. I was so thankful the day I retired, and was able to get the hell out of that environment.
Something about the Pearl that is shameful in my opinion and Portland should not be proud of this. The Pearl used to be nothing but a swampy area with warehouses some which were being used for their original purpose but many abandoned for business and taken over by the homeless. There were a few wholesalers and some dilapidated housing.

The city decided to develop the area because it was a prime location near downtown and the very popular NW area. Government subsidies were sought and granted on the basis of the loans being given that so low income housing would be built as well as higher end condos making a mix of people living in the area.

So far so good. A friend of mine, a senior citizen, was one of the first to move in one of the new middle income buildings. She paid what she could afford for a nice new apartment in a high rise on her social security income. Her building was next to a beautiful expensive new condo. There were several buildings like hers. And then more condos. Nothing much else was there at the time. It was an opportunity for a new community for young and old, rich and middle to low income alike. It should have been a model for all types living together.

But the idea of the mix failed. Gradually, the trendy shops, art galleries, parks etc came in. As the city paid off its debts for the subsidized housing it was not interested in keeping the area a place for that mix of everyone. As had happened all over in Portland neighborhoods, realtors came in and began to make their killing. The plain subsidized buildings were spruced up and purchased by real estate investors. The original idea of an equal mix of people in the Pearl of low, middle and higher income housing was lost. Instead it is probably one of the wealthiest neighborhoods in the city.

I wouldn't say that the yuppies deliberately ruin any neighborhood. They more than likely do not even pay attention to who was there before them, especially those yuppies who come after the first wave. Why would they? Let's be real, has anyone here ever moved into a neighborhood and asked who were the people who had lived there before them? Not too many I wouldn't think.

The problem with the yuppies is they bring money, more money than the people who are already living in an area have so the incumbents are forced to move out. Is that the yuppie's fault? I think it's more the fault of the city that doesn't help the people who are forced out and doesn't provide the opportunity for them to remain in decent housing.

This has happened very rapidly all over Portland but the Pearl is a great example.
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Old 01-23-2013, 07:51 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,689 posts, read 36,118,702 times
Reputation: 63246
Quote:
Originally Posted by cityKing View Post
Typical excuse from someone who never achieved there goals at a young age.

Just like a sports team that makes an excuse why they had a bad year "it's not about winning"

But you know if that sports team had a shot at first place and being number 1 they would do it in a heart beat.

Same goes with people they make it seem like they wouldn't wanna be well off and live the life of there dreams.

But I know very well if you were to be offered being well off and live the life of your dreams, you would take it in a heart beat.

Eventually people who never reach there goals, simply just talk bad about being well off , and doing everything you love is a bad thing.

Just like people who are unsuccessful people try and discourage others from being successful.

Just because they weren't successful they have to try talking others down into being successful, and so they envy it.
Wow, what a weird post. I am now fifty one, but at 28 I was ALREADY living a successful life as a young adult. In fact, by age 28 I was living in Europe. Now - that part of it was great. But there are other components that make a life successful other than money and career.

"The life of my dreams" does not include living in a large metropolitan area. I don't care much for life in a "yuppie city." Been there done that. I prefer living in a small town or rural area outside of a larger metro area. Which is why, as a very successful and fulfilled adult, I live in that scenario now -by choice. I could more than afford living in a huge metro area but I don't want to. So I don't.
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Old 01-23-2013, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Indianapolis
104 posts, read 121,348 times
Reputation: 251
Here's what happens -
1st - A couple bistros and small coffee shops are put into what were historically suspect neighborhoods. These neighborhoods are close to good access to train or bus line that gets you downtown (Chicago) or midtown Manhattan)
2nd - A Starbucks pops up in the neighborhood and then a Whole Foods opens up not far from the Star Bucks
3rd - The old warehouse building is suddenly undergoing a major renovation and converted into lofts
4th - Within months the vacant lots now have new townhouses built on them
5th - You now see vibrant people jogging, walking their dogs, eating at nice restaurants, having a night out with their friends at the local bars and working out at the local gym
6th - You say to yourself - "Damn, 20 years ago I wouldn't have set foot in that neighborhood and now it is the place to be".

There is absolutely nothing wrong with the above scenario. Yes people will be priced out and yes there will be some stuck snobs in the neighborhood. But what there won't be is the high crime and crap. I've seen this happen quite a few times while living in Chicago. Wrigleyville in the 70s was a suspect neighborhood and look at it now. Lincoln Park and Lake View the same. Now neighborhoods like Logan Square and Wicker Park(Humboldt Park) are now beginning their changes. It's OK
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Old 01-23-2013, 11:37 AM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,391 posts, read 24,559,220 times
Reputation: 5662
The problem with most "yuppies" that people speak bad of is they don't have taste. They are only consumers of art and they would gladly trade sterility for authenticity. Yuppies eat at chain restaurants that they don't even know are chain restaurants. Yuppies buy "ethnic" cuisine at whole foods b/c they don't want to have to get cash out at a real ethnic store. But what is someone who likes to move around to do? People who move around bring new customs and trends to new cities so that is also a good thing, but there are those who stay there 30-40 years and feel like they need to "hold it down." I've yet to find a city I'd want to "settle down" in as I gladly pay the premium in not getting rent control or making money on an investment for the experience of a new city.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Wow, what a weird post. I am now fifty one, but at 28 I was ALREADY living a successful life as a young adult. In fact, by age 28 I was living in Europe. Now - that part of it was great. But there are other components that make a life successful other than money and career.

"The life of my dreams" does not include living in a large metropolitan area. I don't care much for life in a "yuppie city." Been there done that. I prefer living in a small town or rural area outside of a larger metro area. Which is why, as a very successful and fulfilled adult, I live in that scenario now -by choice. I could more than afford living in a huge metro area but I don't want to. So I don't.
His post was worded a bit arrogantly, but overall it is true, it is what creates the hate for people doing well in NYC and LA for instance. Both cities = successful people with media exposure.
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Old 01-23-2013, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,655,251 times
Reputation: 35449
Quote:
Originally Posted by LGERMAN View Post
Here's what happens -
1st - A couple bistros and small coffee shops are put into what were historically suspect neighborhoods. These neighborhoods are close to good access to train or bus line that gets you downtown (Chicago) or midtown Manhattan)
2nd - A Starbucks pops up in the neighborhood and then a Whole Foods opens up not far from the Star Bucks
3rd - The old warehouse building is suddenly undergoing a major renovation and converted into lofts
4th - Within months the vacant lots now have new townhouses built on them
5th - You now see vibrant people jogging, walking their dogs, eating at nice restaurants, having a night out with their friends at the local bars and working out at the local gym
6th - You say to yourself - "Damn, 20 years ago I wouldn't have set foot in that neighborhood and now it is the place to be".

There is absolutely nothing wrong with the above scenario. Yes people will be priced out and yes there will be some stuck snobs in the neighborhood. But what there won't be is the high crime and crap. I've seen this happen quite a few times while living in Chicago. Wrigleyville in the 70s was a suspect neighborhood and look at it now. Lincoln Park and Lake View the same. Now neighborhoods like Logan Square and Wicker Park(Humboldt Park) are now beginning their changes. It's OK
The areas though are not necessarily always high crime. In my neighborhood, it was the elderly and lower income people who were forced to move. It was not a high crime area. It was simply an area with inexpensive housing inhabitated by people who remained in the neighborhood for years after the area had been cleaned up of whatever petty crime that had previously discouraged some from moving here.

But then people from other areas realized what a bargain they could get with fixer upper homes and they moved in. They sold them to yuppies. Rental building owners began raising rents. The neighborhood never really needed a whole lot of improvement. It just became more expensive because those who could afford it were willing to pay the prices that people were now charging.
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Old 01-24-2013, 06:27 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,689 posts, read 36,118,702 times
Reputation: 63246
Quote:
Originally Posted by grapico View Post



His post was worded a bit arrogantly, but overall it is true, it is what creates the hate for people doing well in NYC and LA for instance. Both cities = successful people with media exposure.
His post was worded PERSONALLY (not simply arrogantly) - directed at me specifically accusing me of being jealous of him or people like him because supposedly they are successful, while I haven't been.

Which is a total crock. And a weird thing to say to someone anyway, especially someone he doesn't know from Adam. And ESPECIALLY someone like me, who actually IS "successful," at least as most would define it (myself included).

By the way, a lot of people dislike NYC and LA for reasons that are far removed from "being jealous of successful people." In fact, I'd bet that reason is WAY down the list.

"You don't like me because you're jealous?" Give me a break!
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Old 01-24-2013, 07:13 AM
 
Location: Indianapolis
104 posts, read 121,348 times
Reputation: 251
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
The areas though are not necessarily always high crime. In my neighborhood, it was the elderly and lower income people who were forced to move. It was not a high crime area. It was simply an area with inexpensive housing inhabitated by people who remained in the neighborhood for years after the area had been cleaned up of whatever petty crime that had previously discouraged some from moving here.

But then people from other areas realized what a bargain they could get with fixer upper homes and they moved in. They sold them to yuppies. Rental building owners began raising rents. The neighborhood never really needed a whole lot of improvement. It just became more expensive because those who could afford it were willing to pay the prices that people were now charging.

This is a true statement and more often then not it's the perfect scenario for gentrification.
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Old 01-24-2013, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,311,571 times
Reputation: 4270
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Wow, what a weird post. I am now fifty one, but at 28 I was ALREADY living a successful life as a young adult. In fact, by age 28 I was living in Europe. Now - that part of it was great. But there are other components that make a life successful other than money and career.

"The life of my dreams" does not include living in a large metropolitan area. I don't care much for life in a "yuppie city." Been there done that. I prefer living in a small town or rural area outside of a larger metro area. Which is why, as a very successful and fulfilled adult, I live in that scenario now -by choice. I could more than afford living in a huge metro area but I don't want to. So I don't.
Great comments! If somebody today handed me $10 million and said you can take this money only if you are willing to be bored and unhappy the rest of your life, and my other option was to continue to struggle to get by but be a generally happy person -- and these two things were concrete....no other scenarios existed -- I'd probably not take the money. Knowing that, and knowing that the end zone is not THE journey but only a small part of the journey, you can let go of your desperation of being wealthy and just live life day to day on life's terms. I TRY to do this myself, but it's very hard to accomplish and it's very easy to get distracted by others or sidetracked by financial issues....thinking that money will solve my problems and bring me happiness.

I read an article in MONEY Magazine about a study on money and happiness. Wealthy people and "regular" people were surveyed and asked questions pertaining to their level of happiness in life. It basically concluded what most people have heard and assume is cliche: "money and happiness are mutually exclusive". But what is most interesting, IMO, is that they also found that those who gave their money or time (or both) to others (philanthropists) were the most happy of all the subjects -- regardless of wealth status (but generally, wealthier people can afford to be philanthropists). I think that's great news for all of us!!
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Old 01-24-2013, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,103,705 times
Reputation: 3979
Quote:
Originally Posted by cityKing View Post
Typical excuse from someone who never achieved there goals at a young age.

Just like a sports team that makes an excuse why they had a bad year "it's not about winning"

But you know if that sports team had a shot at first place and being number 1 they would do it in a heart beat.

Same goes with people they make it seem like they wouldn't wanna be well off and live the life of there dreams.

But I know very well if you were to be offered being well off and live the life of your dreams, you would take it in a heart beat.

Eventually people who never reach there goals, simply just talk bad about being well off , and doing everything you love is a bad thing.

Just like people who are unsuccessful people try and discourage others from being successful.

Just because they weren't successful they have to try talking others down into being successful, and so they envy it.
Wow, how did you achieve so much success in your life without ever learning the proper use of the words "there" and "their"?

I'm always talking bad about those successful peoples and how lame there dream's are.
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