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Old 11-25-2012, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
432 posts, read 482,544 times
Reputation: 303

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mancat100 View Post
That would be called the free market. If I were the landlord I would have taken the money too.
I'm not saying the landlord was wrong for taking the money. I'm just saying that the guy was selfish for that move. One of Philadelphia's goals is to reduce homelessness and you make it worst by breaking a wall in and forcing another resident who has lived there for over 3 years into the street? Wouldn't you be pissed if that guy was your neighbor?
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Old 11-25-2012, 10:34 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,648,620 times
Reputation: 35449
Quote:
Originally Posted by mancat100 View Post
That would be called the free market. If I were the landlord I would have taken the money too.
I don't think anyone would argue with that but you can't call that improvement as the result of yuppies taking over. Especially when it chases out the residents of neighborhoods who have lived there for many years.

My submission that yuppies have "ruined" Portland is due to the fact that they have made it so expensive, we no longer have the variety of economic diversity of people we once had living here.

Portland has become the personification of a city of "haves and have nots." That is the result of the yuppification of a city.
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Old 11-25-2012, 10:51 PM
 
1,015 posts, read 1,541,069 times
Reputation: 746
I think yuppies do good and bad things. The good is that they get buildings fixed up--Philadelphia for one has a lot of terrible buildings and vacant lots. They support stores. They often get city services to their neighborhoods improved--the city listens to them. It should do this for everyone, but I've repeatedly seen the pattern of improvements going into gentrifying neighborhoods.

On the bad side, their presence leads to rising rents and home prices, and displacement. Presumably the yuppies aren't increasing inequality at a metropolitan area scale (they were already there) but they certainly can cause that a neighborhood scale. Presumably that makes it harder for people in the neighborhood to get along and work together.

I think there's a sweet spot in the life of gentrifying neighborhoods. That's when the neighborhood has improved enough to have more life--new stores, restaurants. Buildings aren't crumbling, there are people on the street. But the pre-existing population is there alongside the new. One place that feels this way to me is Downtown Los Angeles, you can definitely see different populations there. It might be easier there because the population is going up, converting non-residential buildings where people weren't getting displaced. I'd be interested if other people think there are sweet spot neighborhoods around. The problem is that the dynamics of the American housing market usually don't let those places stabilize--they either further gentrify or start to deteriorate again. American cities have limited powers in this situation--imagine in that bad story above if the city could have helped the previous tenant find another place.
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Old 11-25-2012, 11:06 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,703,198 times
Reputation: 9029
Do people really think that Yuppies and Hipsters are the same thing or similar? Lol.

I would think people would be more concerned with murderes and child molestors instead of complaining about yuppies.
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Old 11-25-2012, 11:31 PM
 
2,096 posts, read 3,847,635 times
Reputation: 1214
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
Portland never felt like a larger Albany. Nothing even close. What improvements have the hipsters made?
Well there's better bars and restaurants. A lot of hipsters aren't high income btw.
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Old 11-26-2012, 01:02 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
9,832 posts, read 7,671,265 times
Reputation: 6288
Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
Do people really think that Yuppies and Hipsters are the same thing or similar? Lol.

I would think people would be more concerned with murderes and child molestors instead of complaining about yuppies.
Bingo.

You can spot the posters who grew up in nice neighborhoods--they're the ones complaining about the lack of flavor and character in formerly dumpy areas. Had they grown up in one of them, perhaps they'd sing a different tune.

I grew up in a rough neighborhood during a particularly rough era (Highland Park, early 90's) and let me just say--I love the way it has cleaned up over the years. It's still majority Hispanic, still has tons of character, but is far less dangerous and sketchy than it once was. It has drawn attention from hipsters and the artistic class over the years, they've only been a positive, so far.
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Old 11-26-2012, 06:38 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,651 posts, read 36,106,549 times
Reputation: 63165
Dallas, definitely.

No, wait...Dallas already sucked. They just made it worse.

Now Fort Worth is a different story altogether! Yuppies - STAY OUT OF FORT WORTH! Take your lattes elsewhere.
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Old 11-26-2012, 09:21 AM
 
Location: 602/520
2,441 posts, read 6,118,248 times
Reputation: 1815
New York. The city is completely different now that the yuppies and hipsters have taken hold. Formerly affordable neighborhoods have turned into extremely expensive areas, pushing longtime residents out. Neighborhoods that used to have a little edge to them are now full of high rise condos and corporate buildings. Sure, New York is MUCH safer now than it was 20 years ago, but the character is being chiseled away. I am noticing that the outer boroughs are now changing. Brooklyn looks and feels like a completely different place whenever I go back.
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Old 11-26-2012, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
1,565 posts, read 2,566,204 times
Reputation: 1655
Quote:
Originally Posted by Henry Hill View Post
I'm not saying the landlord was wrong for taking the money. I'm just saying that the guy was selfish for that move. One of Philadelphia's goals is to reduce homelessness and you make it worst by breaking a wall in and forcing another resident who has lived there for over 3 years into the street? Wouldn't you be pissed if that guy was your neighbor?
Yes. I'd hate him too. The guy sounds like a tool.

That being said, I still am in favor of gentrification for certain parts of certain cities. Neighborhoods change all the time. In Philadelphia, for many decades, they always changed for the worse. Now we have a few areas near Center City changing for the better, and I think it's a good thing.

I'm sorry that some good people get pushed out, but these improvements needed to happen for the city to survive.
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Old 11-26-2012, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,055 posts, read 16,063,174 times
Reputation: 12630
Quote:
Originally Posted by belmont22 View Post
Portland is still a good city. In fact I think hipsters have improved it. If the old Portland is anything like North Portland or East Portland, gimme the new!
This. The problem is hipster/yuppies also have money, so while they invariably improve cities they also tend to drive up costs which in turns drives people out. In turn, that means selfish people who only care about themselves, such as Henry Hill, to complain about yuppies being selfish people who only care about themselves. Not that I can't appreciate the frustration of being gentrified out of a neighborhood, but the neighborhood as whole is better off -- lower crime, more economic opportunity, more productivity, better schools, more amenities. It's just the old inhabitants are often priced out and often feel that, by seniority, they have some higher right to a neighborhood.
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