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Old 11-27-2012, 06:40 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,655,251 times
Reputation: 35449

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raymond Chandler Lives View Post
Bingo.

You can spot the posters who grew up in nice neighborhoods--they're the ones complaining about the lack of flavor and character in formerly dumpy areas. Had they grown up in one of them, perhaps they'd sing a different tune.

I grew up in a rough neighborhood during a particularly rough era (Highland Park, early 90's) and let me just say--I love the way it has cleaned up over the years. It's still majority Hispanic, still has tons of character, but is far less dangerous and sketchy than it once was. It has drawn attention from hipsters and the artistic class over the years, they've only been a positive, so far.
Well I for one have lived in both. Anyone familiar with the Garfield Park neighborhood in Chicago, that's where I spent my first eight years. Not considered exactly the best area when my family left in the 50's.
Dumpy does not even beging to describe it. But I think dumpy can sometimes be interesting too.

After that my family lived in blue collar lower middle class neighborhoods. Same when I grew up and move out on my own in Chicago. That's where I lived in Portland until the neighborhood turned on me and became "trendy."
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Old 11-27-2012, 07:02 PM
 
1,189 posts, read 1,808,700 times
Reputation: 972
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnbiggs View Post
Haven't really heard about the yuppies getting to Texas yet, can any of you Texans elaborate?
I dont live in texas but i can understand austin. Its considered the hippy capital of texas, and known as the people's republic of austin.
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Old 11-28-2012, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Carrboro and Concord, NC
964 posts, read 2,045,759 times
Reputation: 1230
Based on the last 15 years of Chapel Hill's history, I'd say yuppies yes, hipsters no. The genuine hipsters, who attracted all the attention to town in the first place, with various art and musical goings-on, have long since been priced/run out of town.

15-20 years down the road, and everyone who lives here has been published in some obscure journal that no one except people exactly like them reads, and overall it's what happens when Mayberry thinks it's San Francisco. It's turned into a real brain trust, which has its' benefits, but the creative community that woke this place up from its' provincial sleepiness has long since scattered to the four winds, and the creative scene has mostly collapsed, or moved, with some reluctance, to Durham.
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Old 11-29-2012, 07:12 PM
 
Location: Florida
862 posts, read 1,215,141 times
Reputation: 1407
NYC
Portland
Dallas
Seattle
Charlotte
Atlanta
San Francisco
Baltimore

The hipsters have ruined these places too.
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Old 11-30-2012, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,881 posts, read 10,379,700 times
Reputation: 8050
San Francisco, DC, NYC, Boston in that order.
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Old 12-01-2012, 06:06 PM
 
Location: Ohio, USA
1,085 posts, read 1,345,850 times
Reputation: 970
Yuppies are everywhere now
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Old 12-02-2012, 08:42 AM
 
642 posts, read 960,689 times
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What is the difference between a wealthy young person and a yuppie?

When I think of yuppies I think of young, upper middle class white people driving Subarus and wearing North Face vests.

Are there any reasons they're hated besides driving up real estate prices and being kind of culturally bland and over-consumeristic?
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Old 12-02-2012, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Lakeland, Florida
6,972 posts, read 12,480,117 times
Reputation: 8712
Quote:
Originally Posted by abqpsychlist View Post
What is the difference between a wealthy young person and a yuppie?

When I think of yuppies I think of young, upper middle class white people driving Subarus and wearing North Face vests.

Are there any reasons they're hated besides driving up real estate prices and being kind of culturally bland and over-consumeristic?

I don't know about every city but what you described is a good description of Yuppies in Portland. My discomfort with them was I lived right in thier main neighborhood.( The Pearl District of Portland. ) Or I should say they became the majority resident. I felt very much the outsider. Everything became high end expensive stores and businesses. The only everyday businesses to go to that were not high end were, Safeway, Subway, Quizonos, Rite Aid and some banks. Everything else was doggie botiques, doggy hotels, Expensive cafe's, dress shops, and other high end shops. Anything and everything to let it be known that the Yuppie was the target resident, and everyone else was just more tax revenue. Very unwelcoming feeling. Now and then some of these Yuppie residents showed some minor level of friendliness, However many wouldn't give you the time of day. They would walk up and down the streets, with thier eyes focused on thier IPhone. I think the lack of common courtesy, and the focus on themself to the point it is nauseating was my biggest dislike about them. Perhaps if one got to know some of them or they allowed that. Then a different impression might be formed. They just seem very self centered and rather thoughtless. When I would see them in public places, they seemed so much younger than I was at their age. I noticed many seemed younger in behavior than thier actual age. I mean these people are well into thier 20's 30's and even 40's Some seemed rather immature to come right out and say it. I felt a number of them could have used a few years in the military to grow up some.

When I moved away from Portland my contact with that type of resident ended.
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Old 12-02-2012, 07:38 PM
 
510 posts, read 769,158 times
Reputation: 284
In the case of Seattle, I think the yuppies are what gave the 'city' it's look and feel, the energy and trendiness. Where they are 'ruining' things is when they start moving into the surrounding areas. They are doing more to twist around the suburbs and rural communities from their culture than the cities which are supposed to be the cultural melting pots.
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Old 12-03-2012, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,673 posts, read 33,676,768 times
Reputation: 51867
How do they ruin it?
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