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Old 11-26-2012, 05:17 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
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What are the exact perameters or chracteristics a community must have to be considered a city or a town? What are the differences between a city and a town?
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Old 11-26-2012, 05:23 PM
 
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Government, towns have selectmen-town meeting systems while cities has mayor-city council
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Old 11-26-2012, 05:26 PM
 
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In Pennsylvania, at least, it's the government structure. We have many boroughs and townships that are larger than a lot of cities in the state.
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Old 11-26-2012, 05:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Government, towns have selectmen-town meeting systems while cities has mayor-city council
That might be just a New England thing... The rest of the country doesn't have selectmen-town meeting systems.

There's small incorporated municipalities considered towns in the rest of the US that have a mayor-city council system. Furthermore some larger cities(Phoenix for example) have council-manager-style city governments. In some states town vs. city is simply a matter of population.
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Old 11-26-2012, 05:47 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
That might be just a New England thing... The rest of the country doesn't have selectmen-town meeting systems.

There's small incorporated municipalities considered towns in the rest of the US that have a mayor-city council system. Furthermore some larger cities(Phoenix for example) have council-manager-style city governments. In some states town vs. city is simply a matter of population.
And what is the population requirement to make it a city instead of a town?
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Old 11-26-2012, 05:59 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
And what is the population requirement to make it a city instead of a town?

It varies from state to state for states that have official designations for a "town".

Town - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In Wyoming it's less than 4,000 people; In Alabama it's less than 2,000. In some places any municipality that's incorporated is considered a city. In other places there's no distinction between city, town, and village other than what the municipality wants to call itself. In other places it varies by the form of government.

These are the official designtation of "city" or "town" in general usage is can vary from calling any small municipality a town--and what's considered small could be anything under 5,000 people to anything under 50,000 depends on who's making the distinction.
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Old 11-26-2012, 07:30 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
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Dang, I was hoping for more concrete answers, but the answers I see are some of the conclusions I had come to already.
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Old 11-27-2012, 03:43 PM
 
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In my current town of 965 we have a mayor-council form of government.

I've lived North, Midwest, Northwest, Southwest, South, and Mid-Atlantic and never been in a place with Selectmen. I think that's only in New England.
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Old 11-27-2012, 07:26 PM
 
Location: Atlanta & NYC
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One starts with a c and one starts with a t.
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Old 11-28-2012, 05:28 PM
 
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I think it's pretty subjective but for me a city would have more than a couple of buildings (other than the hospital) that are more than 4 stories high. A public transit system perhaps... I'll post some more when I think of them. For me the break seems to be around 50K people. There are suburbs larger than that that I don't particularly consider cities, though.
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