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Old 11-27-2012, 08:03 PM
 
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I'm not saying that St. Paul is in even the top 20, but contrary to popular belief, it is pretty hilly.
One of the steepest highways in the city is actually a bridge, the high bridge.
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_SURKoZUIuk...over+Miss..jpg

Last edited by Bslette; 11-27-2012 at 08:12 PM..
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Old 11-28-2012, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Moose Jaw, in between the Moose's butt and nose.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bslette View Post
How about this, its a Flickr gallery of hilly cities:

Hilly Cities - a gallery on Flickr

Although Duluth isn't major population wise, it still is one of the hilliest cities in the U.S., considering its size it is very hilly. It isn't just some small town, it still is a small-medium population center, and a huge industrial center, seeing as it's the 17th largest port in the United States, and both the largest freshwater and inland port in the world.

Look at the hill above downtown:

All sizes | Downtown Duluth from Canal Park | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

By the way, I took this picture!!! There will be no problems, because it is my Flickr account. Thank you. Also, I haven't uploaded many pictures yet, so it's pretty skimpy photostream.

I live near Tacoma, WA, I think, that's hillier than Duluth.
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Old 11-28-2012, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Carrboro, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
LA is crazy in that regard. LA almost goes from 0 to higher than the highest peaks on the whole East coast in such a small space
You must be exaggerating. 5080 ft is not higher than the highest peaks on the east coast. (Which get up to 6684 ft).

There are municipalities in NC that actually have a higher elevation than that. Sugar Mountain goes up to 5400 within its borders. Sugar Mountain, North Carolina - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia It's not a major city so it's off-topic for the thread. It's a tiny little village. Still, had to set the record straight.
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Old 11-28-2012, 01:40 PM
 
Location: The City
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Originally Posted by Vatnos View Post
You must be exaggerating. 5080 ft is not higher than the highest peaks on the east coast. (Which get up to 6684 ft).

There are municipalities in NC that actually have a higher elevation than that. Sugar Mountain goes up to 5400 within its borders. Sugar Mountain, North Carolina - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia It's not a major city so it's off-topic for the thread. It's a tiny little village. Still, had to set the record straight.
meant almost (left a word out)
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Old 11-28-2012, 02:17 PM
 
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Originally Posted by pch1013 View Post
I'd be remiss if I didn't mention that Portland's highest point is higher than any of those.
Yup, Council Crest and parts of the West Hills top out over 1,050 ft. Portland probably doesn't get as much recognition as being a hilly city as some other places on the West Coast--which is in part that a lot of downtown and the eastside is fairly level. But once you go to the west edge of downtown or much of SW Portland it's all big hills--and the eastside is interuppted by a bunch of large volcanic hills like Mt. Tabor or Rocky Butte.

One thing that's different is that in Portland they almost always built windy streets curving around the contours of the hills rather than in places like San Francisco or Seattle where in some places they just built wider streets straight up and over hills in the central neighborhoods(which leads to much steeper streets and a more dramatic effect). Places like Russian Hill or Nob Hill or Capitol Hill or Queen Anne don't really have an equivialant in Portland for a dense neighborhood with steep slopes--though the portion of SW Portland around Vista towards the West Hills from the Goose Hollow or Nob Hill comes pretty close in some ways. I've always imagined though what Portland would've been like if they would've build denser housing on some of the hills near downtown; it's mostly parks and more spread-out single-family residential on the hills.
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Old 11-28-2012, 03:28 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
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Toss up between Pittsburgh and Seattle, both cityscapes cover mostly hilly terrain without any expansive valleys in between.
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Old 11-28-2012, 04:18 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
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Most SE piedmont cities are pretty hilly. Birmingham is particularly hilly.
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Old 11-28-2012, 06:59 PM
 
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Originally Posted by beenhereandthere View Post
I live near Tacoma, WA, I think, that's hillier than Duluth.
Well of course there are hillier cities, but Duluth is up there. Tacoma is also in Washington, which is by far "hilllier" (mountainous) than Minnesota.
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Old 11-28-2012, 07:19 PM
 
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I think SF is indeed first. From pictures I've seen, I'd go with Pittsburgh next. I think Seattle is up there, but aside from the seven hills, like Rome, it can be flat(ter) and gridded in many parts. Seattle has hills incorporated into its downtown, while Portland is more of a slightly tilted CBD as it goes from north to south. Similarly, Portland OR is hilly in a few spots, but the entire east side, except for a few outcroppings, is a flat grid.

I believe Duluth MN is hilly, but it doesn't make a dent into the big city category. Neither does Tacoma WA.
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Old 11-30-2012, 05:38 PM
 
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San Francisco, Oakland, and LA all have public streets which are staircases between two (or sometimes more) streets, which were usually built to access trolley lines in the valleys. What other American cities have stair streets?
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