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Old 12-01-2012, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Columbus,Georgia
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Atlanta.

Georgia alone is hilly.
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Old 12-01-2012, 01:06 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
The last two are overpasses, not really "inclined bridges". The first is though, of course.
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Old 12-01-2012, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Raccoon City
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Kansas City is also surprisingly hilly. I forget until I'm coming in from I-70.
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Old 12-01-2012, 03:31 PM
 
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There are no stair streets in Knoxville. It is hilly but the bigger hills aren't developed in the way you see them developed in SF and Seattle.
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Old 12-01-2012, 11:17 PM
 
583 posts, read 759,567 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beenhereandthere View Post
Seems to me, that it's probably in this order, based on my observations (TV, Internet) and seeing things with my own eyes.

In order, 1 SF, 2 Pittsburgh, 3, Seattle, 4, San Diego, 5, Cincinnati.
Not that it matters much, but Pittsburgh feels far hillier than San Francisco. San Francisco has many usable areas, while Pittsburgh seems to be all hills.
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Old 12-02-2012, 12:02 AM
 
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The South of Market/Mission area, which was San Francisco's industrial area, is fairly flat. Also, west of Twin Peaks, the Richmond and Sunset have a number of pretty flat areas. San Francisco can be deceptive, though, because the city builders of the 19th Century just ran their street over the hills without much regard to the street grade. So some areas are quite busy even though they're on hills.
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Old 12-03-2012, 09:57 AM
 
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San Francisco may have greater elevation change, but I feel like Pittsburgh's topography is more turbulent and rugged.
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Old 12-05-2012, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
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Seattle, San Francisco and Pittsburgh are tops.
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Old 12-05-2012, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
LA is crazy in that regard. LA almost goes from 0 to higher than the highest peaks on the whole East coast in such a small space


to the earlier comments on LA. Yes there are hilly streets but on the whole most of the developed space (save some wealthy enclaves on the hils) are actually not that hilly


As an aside the views from the Strip down the modest hill with the lights are amazing to me one of the single most spectacular views in the country if not the world.


On SF from 0 to 925 it would appear Pittsburgh has an elevation change of between 600-650 feet. Question on SF. After the tallest hill with the Tokyo looking radio tower. what would be the next highest point. the twin peaks?


Also as a city the view down California with the tall buildings and Bay bridge (not to mention cable cars) is flat out one of my favorite single views. Cruising through Chinatown then just Bam...

Actually Los Angeles has lots of hilly neighborhoods outside of the wealthy areas, those are just the most famous.

Silver Lake, Echo Park, Los Feliz, Westlake, Mid-City West, Bunker Hill, El Sereno, Mt Washington, Ladera Heights, Crenshaw, Baldwin Hills, Eagle Rock, Highland Park, Cheviot Hills, etc, and that is just in the Basin, there are quite a few hilly neighborhoods in the Valley as well. Even my neighborhood has its share of hills (I am right up against the Hollywood Hills). However since most of the city is developed on the flatlands, I think that is what most people picture (I know I did before moving here) - LA is one of those cities that could be called both the flattest and the hilliest.
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Old 12-05-2012, 04:06 PM
 
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Morgantown, WV feels like it's on the side of a cliff.
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