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Old 12-08-2012, 12:51 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,708,360 times
Reputation: 9029

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mplsite View Post
???
The Cleveland metro is 2 million vs over 3.5 million for Detroit/TC: that's almost half as much. As far as amenities for city/metro it competes and even bests Detroit in numerous departments, but there's no contest with the TC which offers whatever Cleveland does/doesn't have in spades. Cleveland is comparable to metros closer to its size like nearby Columbus, Cincinnati, Indianapolis, or a bit further out, St Louis whose metro is closer to 3 million.
I could care less about population, the Twin Cities are great but its so spread out and Cleveland has that more dense urban feel plus TC is very isolated from other large cities... there is nothing to the west, Winnipeg 8 hours north, Milwaukee/Chicago 6 hours SW and Des Moines 3 hours south.
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Old 12-08-2012, 03:41 PM
 
Location: MPLS
1,068 posts, read 1,094,371 times
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Mpls is 58 sq mi and St Paul 56. Combined they're not much bigger than Cleveland in sq mileage (82 sq mi) and the bulk of dense urban districts are in Mpls' small 58 sq mi. I can easily walk or ride outside of Downtown's high-rise laden multi-block districts right into Uptown or NE, both of which are large dense neighborhoods that build off of Downtown's density. I felt the opposite in Cleveland which only gave me a big city feel on Euclid Ave between Public Square and Playhouse Square. Tiny districts that drop off suddenly like in Ohio City just didn't give me a big city feel despite the market and rail lines: I need at least more than two blocks to feel like I'm in a "big city" neighborhood and in Cleveland such districts are not only tiny but there's less of them and they're spread out over 82 sq mi. I'm just confused that anyone would find Cleveland overall to be very dense and/or urban outside of a choice stretch of Downtown.

Distances to other cities don't really make sense in measuring how great a city is or isn't: not sure why it's so common to see many people bring this up. Sure, Chicago is 6 hours away, but that's not far at all and is really the only other one worth being close to. I figure if a big asset for your city is that it's close to other better cities, then why not just move to one of those and cut out the middleman? Boasting that your city is closer to Chicago/DC/NYC doesn't mean much when you can't hit up Chicago/DC/NYC destinations in your city on a whim tonight.
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Old 12-08-2012, 07:32 PM
 
1,911 posts, read 3,239,704 times
Reputation: 910
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mplsite View Post
Boasting that your city is closer to Chicago/DC/NYC doesn't mean much when you can't hit up Chicago/DC/NYC destinations in your city on a whim tonight.

Best Narnian Cities (Pop. 200,000+)
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Old 12-08-2012, 07:42 PM
 
1,911 posts, read 3,239,704 times
Reputation: 910
Quote:
Originally Posted by PBZ1113 View Post
I am not sure if I understand your point. Many cities in the Midwest are progressive to liberal not just Minneapolis, Madison, and Chicago. Columbus, OH and Ann Arbor, MI are on that list also.

The Midwest in general are accepting of GLBT population. Even medium-sized Midwestern college towns such as Iowa City and Bloomington, IN are very GLBT-friendly.

Just because the Midwest seems to be boring to outsiders doesn't mean that the region is very conservative.
I went to Iowa, so I lived in Iowa City. Yes, it is liberal on campus, even by "liberal university" standards. The outside community (beyond activist students and professors) itself is not liberal. What I'm saying is, there is no city with true "across-the-board" liberalism they way you'd find in Seattle, Portland, SF, or LA in the midwest. Minneapolis is the only liberal big city in the midwest. Denver is not part of the midwest, but it is liberal as well.

The other large midwestern cities think because they vote democrat, and have a visible gay population, they're basically within one standard deviation of SF, when they are not. Pockets of liberalism, having some gay nightlife does not make a city liberal. Green Bay WI would then become liberal.

Midwesterners for some reason generally consider voting democrat to be the same as "progressive liberal".

It's not.
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Old 12-08-2012, 07:44 PM
 
94 posts, read 137,144 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by streetcreed View Post
Yes really of all Midwestern cities Chicago is not the most LGBT.

Columbus and Minneapolis have embraced their LGBT populations on a much more progressive level and in terms of per capita LGBT population: Columbus is the highest not on the coast followed by Minneapolis.

Now Chicago is a very progressive city, huge, and of course a great place to live too.

But many do not realize that in terms of per capita it isn't the "gayest" place in the midwest region. That would be Columbus (for larger cities)
I believe your information about Columbus is inaccurate.

According to some sources, I read, Minneapolis has the highest percentage of GLBT population after San Francisco, Seattle, and Atlanta.

Yes, Columbus is very GLBT friendly but it is not one of the largest though.
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Old 12-08-2012, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,513 posts, read 9,049,534 times
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All pictures of Indianapolis above!


Picture of Chicago, found it laying in my photo album and decided to throw it in there. xD
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Old 12-08-2012, 08:03 PM
 
94 posts, read 137,144 times
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Great pictures, ColdAilment! How do you post your pictures that big without ending up like small attachments like mine of Minneapolis and Madison above?
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Old 12-08-2012, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
1,277 posts, read 4,154,343 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RonnieJonez View Post
I went to Iowa, so I lived in Iowa City. Yes, it is liberal on campus, even by "liberal university" standards. The outside community (beyond activist students and professors) itself is not liberal. What I'm saying is, there is no city with true "across-the-board" liberalism they way you'd find in Seattle, Portland, SF, or LA in the midwest. Minneapolis is the only liberal big city in the midwest. Denver is not part of the midwest, but it is liberal as well.

The other large midwestern cities think because they vote democrat, and have a visible gay population, they're basically within one standard deviation of SF, when they are not. Pockets of liberalism, having some gay nightlife does not make a city liberal. Green Bay WI would then become liberal.

Midwesterners for some reason generally consider voting democrat to be the same as "progressive liberal".

It's not.
Columbus', and some other cities, policies are liberal. These are places that are liberal not because of a college campus but the widespread city, metro, and this extends to citywide polices. The city is very progressive and especially on LGBT rights. I invite you to come and study more about. I think you would be very surprised.

It is a fact some dont know that Columbus has the largest pride parade in the midwest after Chicago. Over 120,000 attend yearly. It is a very welcoming and liberal city. But back to the topic:

An example of these citywide policies are that the entire city has policies extending LGBT city domestic partnerships to couples and more (like other cities do, where states deny it). Because the state won't the city is recognizing partnerships. If Columbus was all of Ohio it would have polices as liberal as the coast (sometimes it is hard place to live as the city/county are much more progressive than the state).

The city has for several decades had a large LGBT population and this has led to very public citywide inclusion. HRC did rate Columbus' 83 on the LGBT equality index.

This index looks at laws and polices (from city government to schools to state government and police) It also has one of the largest per capita donations to LGBT organizations. It really is a politically driven city that puts its money where its mouth is. And I don't like that being underestimated based on people's experiences in other places.


On the HRC equality index (just published) some of the highest midwest cities were Minneapolis, Chicago, Milwaukee, Columbus. This index recognizes cities not for bars or something trivial but widespread metro and city LGBT favorable policies. And as you said that's what matters.

Here is a link to the index, you can read about their measurements and see the cities that do stack up well in the midwest: http://www.hrc.org/files/assets/reso...12_HRC_MEI.pdf
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Old 12-08-2012, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,513 posts, read 9,049,534 times
Reputation: 5008
Quote:
Originally Posted by PBZ1113 View Post
Great pictures, ColdAilment! How do you post your pictures that big without ending up like small attachments like mine of Minneapolis and Madison above?
I upload all my pictures to my photobucket photo album, then go to the picture and right click on it and click on copy image location. Then go to post your reply on a thread and click on the yellow icon with the mountain in it, right click in the box to post your image location, the picture will come up in full size.
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Old 12-08-2012, 09:06 PM
 
94 posts, read 137,144 times
Reputation: 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by streetcreed View Post
Columbus', and some other cities, policies are liberal. These are places that are liberal not because of a college campus but the widespread city, metro, and this extends to citywide polices. The city is very progressive and especially on LGBT rights. I invite you to come and study more about. I think you would be very surprised.

It is a fact some dont know that Columbus has the largest pride parade in the midwest after Chicago. Over 120,000 attend yearly. It is a very welcoming and liberal city. But back to the topic:

An example of these citywide policies are that the entire city has policies extending LGBT city domestic partnerships to couples and more (like other cities do, where states deny it). Because the state won't the city is recognizing partnerships. If Columbus was all of Ohio it would have polices as liberal as the coast (sometimes it is hard place to live as the city/county are much more progressive than the state).

The city has for several decades had a large LGBT population and this has led to very public citywide inclusion. HRC did rate Columbus' 83 on the LGBT equality index.

This index looks at laws and polices (from city government to schools to state government and police) It also has one of the largest per capita donations to LGBT organizations. It really is a politically driven city that puts its money where its mouth is. And I don't like that being underestimated based on people's experiences in other places.


On the HRC equality index (just published) some of the highest midwest cities were Minneapolis, Chicago, Milwaukee, Columbus. This index recognizes cities not for bars or something trivial but widespread metro and city LGBT favorable policies. And as you said that's what matters.

Here is a link to the index, you can read about their measurements and see the cities that do stack up well in the midwest: http://www.hrc.org/files/assets/reso...12_HRC_MEI.pdf
Thank you for sharing the link to HRC Equality Index List by City. I never knew about such a list other than annual Gay-Friendly Cities in America.

Last edited by PBZ1113; 12-08-2012 at 09:18 PM..
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