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Old 12-06-2012, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,252 posts, read 54,695,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
Not too many towns away from the cities that are predominantly Black. I'm not even talking about suburbs, I'm talking about way out, far-flung towns. Blacks for the most part, are relegated to urban areas up there. That's why parts of NYC and surrounding communities(Newark, parts of LI, East Orange, etc) are so Black(some of the Blackest cities int the US) but get really White the further you get from the city.
No, I'd agree that not too many towns outside the urban areas are PREDOMINANTLY black. They are never going to be, because the black population overall is so much lower to begin with.

What I'm saying is that where once there were all-white towns, it is now not unusual to have black families living there, too, I mean to the point where people don't really give a black family in the neighborhood a second glance. There are a LOT of black people in NJ towns now who got out of the ghetto areas a generation or two ago and own their own homes in suburban towns. No, they won't make up the majority population of these suburban towns, but it's not considered remarkable anymore, either.
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Old 12-06-2012, 09:52 PM
 
6,127 posts, read 6,454,215 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
^ I always thought that Anglo-American meant all English speaking Americans regardless of race.

Anyway, besides things like language, race, natural geography, climate (this is a biggie), politics, religion, architecture etc., what other differences across the country would make a New Englander feel "culture shocked"?

What thing that interests me and I do not think anyone mentioned yet --- urban development, land use and local government in New England. The way the 6 New England states are developed simply looks different from much of the country.

I wonder if this is because of their unique style of local government --- everything is incorporated into cities and towns, little to no county government, small states closer to the people. Some other states have some similarities (notably in the Northeast and Upper Midwest) but their is nothing quite like these 6 states.
Interesting point. I once posted on a forum with someone from CT. I made a comment about having to pay for a library card because I lived outside city limits. She just couldn't grasp the concept that my address was the town, but I lived in the unincorporated county. I couldn't figure out how to dumb it down for her.
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Old 12-07-2012, 09:02 AM
 
56,755 posts, read 81,082,761 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
No, I'd agree that not too many towns outside the urban areas are PREDOMINANTLY black. They are never going to be, because the black population overall is so much lower to begin with.

What I'm saying is that where once there were all-white towns, it is now not unusual to have black families living there, too, I mean to the point where people don't really give a black family in the neighborhood a second glance. There are a LOT of black people in NJ towns now who got out of the ghetto areas a generation or two ago and own their own homes in suburban towns. No, they won't make up the majority population of these suburban towns, but it's not considered remarkable anymore, either.
Very true and it isn't necessarily about moving out of the cities, but there have been small towns with notable Black communities throughout the Northeast. Even in Upstate NY, there are small towns/cities with notable Black populations like Lyons, Clyde, Newark, Sodus, Albion, Medina, LeRoy, Caledonia, Scottsville, Corning, Hornell and some others. Some are long time Black populations/communities too. There are Hispanic populations/communities in small Upstate towns and cities as well. They won't be predominate, but they are definitely there. An indicator of this is looking at school demographics or say looking at certain HS sporting events/teams. here is a website of HS Basketball teams from the Rochester NY area and click on team photos of schools like Batavia, Dansville, Lyons and Williamson for examples of what I'm talking about: Section V Boys' Basketball 2012-2013
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Old 12-07-2012, 10:18 AM
 
Location: USA
8,016 posts, read 9,498,853 times
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you're right. america is weird, depending
on what state you are from.
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Old 12-07-2012, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,252 posts, read 54,695,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
Anyone who fears that Southerners would not "accept them" because of their accent is an ignorant fool living under a rock! Seriously? Really?! Gimme a break!

This thread is ridiculous ... the OP is completely uneducated and / or untraveled.

I'm simply amazed that people in the United States still harbor this kind of ignorance in this day and time.
You might think so, but we were pretty shocked when my great-uncle moved to NC upon his retirement a few years back (his wife was from there) and went to buy a used truck in TN. Drove an hour there with the neighbor who knew the truck owner, and when they got there and he introduced himself, the truck owner looked at him and said, "You a YANKEE? Get off my property.". Turned his back and walked into his house.

We in NJ could not believe this was still going on in the 1990s. Hopefully, that was rare and will get rarer.
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Old 12-07-2012, 12:53 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,252 posts, read 54,695,623 times
Reputation: 66772
Quote:
Originally Posted by gabetx View Post
You know what is weird...

A lot of people I have met and spoke with from the Northeast are so oblivious as to how the rest of the country is aside from their region. Some people are shocked that people need cars and cities aren't walkable in the south. Or in Texas, a buddy of mine was surprised that there were actual cities in Texas and not everyone was a cowboy. I have met people, not only from the Northeast, that are surprised that Texas isn't all desert and cactus. My mom is an immigrant from Europe and was devastatingly shocked as to how different things were in Texas. I have met several Northeasterners that are the same way. I don't know what it is, but I'd guess it's because the Northeast is a very liberal area and believes what is portrayed on the media about the different regions of the country.

I've always thought how funny it is how such educated people are so gullible and can have such a misconception to how the rest of the country really is outside of their region.

Luckily for me, I have traveled throughout the southern United States and throughout Europe and have grown up with such an open mind to new places. I've also learned to NEVER believe the media, or any television for that matter, and never travel to a new area without an open mind.

I have never been to the Northeast, but would love to go one day. Hopefully 19 years from now, or maybe longer, depending on when I want to retire and begin a new career, I can get an opportunity to move to a region of the United States I have never been to before, (preferably a major metropolitan area). That is one of my life goals.

Just remember, every region of the US will be different than yours. If you go in with an open mind, and are willing to meet new people and adapt to a new area and climate, there shouldn't be such a "culture shock" within the same country you live in.
That happens everywhere. Recently met a woman from the PNW who moved here to Central NJ with her Coast Guard husband. She said she was shocked that NJ was so green

I agree, don't base your knowledge on TV and movies.
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Old 12-07-2012, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,252 posts, read 54,695,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
North Jersey has a really large Indian population
Yes, we do. And talk about diversity--I have four Indians in my office, all from difeerent parts of India. One is Catholic, one Hindu, one Jain, one non-religious. They come from different climates and eat different kinds of foods. And they don't all speak the same Indian language.

What they all have in common is that they live in NJ!
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Old 12-07-2012, 01:43 PM
 
14,111 posts, read 22,783,384 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Yes, we do. And talk about diversity--I have four Indians in my office, all from difeerent parts of India. One is Catholic, one Hindu, one Jain, one non-religious. They come from different climates and eat different kinds of foods. And they don't all speak the same Indian language.

What they all have in common is that they live in NJ!
Or that they're Indian.
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Old 12-08-2012, 06:46 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,252 posts, read 54,695,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
Or that they're Indian.
LOL. Or that they work in the same office!
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Old 12-08-2012, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Earth
1,306 posts, read 1,257,595 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBeagleLady View Post
Interesting point. I once posted on a forum with someone from CT. I made a comment about having to pay for a library card because I lived outside city limits. She just couldn't grasp the concept that my address was the town, but I lived in the unincorporated county. I couldn't figure out how to dumb it down for her.
I've traveled a fair bit of the country and I sometimes have a hard time understanding it. Help me out with this...If you live in a town, within a county that has a government, who takes care of your town services? Is it the county or the town? What if you live in a county, but not in a town, is your area run by the county?

In Mass and most of New England, the county government is either non-existent or they serve minor roles such as prisons or as bodies that organize region wide projects.

The ignorance of each other's regions goes both ways. I remember talking to a guy from Arizona who couldn't grasp the concept that our entire state was incorporated into towns or cities. He asked, "What happens when you leave your town?" to which I replied, "You enter another town." He was dumbfounded
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