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Old 12-23-2013, 01:55 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,802,907 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by funlol View Post
If you are an American over the age of 12 and still get a culture shock traveling to other parts of the country, you probably didn't know much about our country to begin with.

If you have "culture shock" traveling within the states, try going to Pakistan, Iraq, Mongolia, North Korea, Nigeria, or something. You might have a heart attack. No wonder people say Americans are ignorant.
+1

Couldn't agree more.
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Old 12-23-2013, 10:10 PM
 
279 posts, read 364,543 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by funlol View Post
If you are an American over the age of 12 and still get a culture shock traveling to other parts of the country, you probably didn't know much about our country to begin with.

If you have "culture shock" traveling within the states, try going to Pakistan, Iraq, Mongolia, North Korea, Nigeria, or something. You might have a heart attack. No wonder people say Americans are ignorant.

I hate when people make this argument, and I have immigrant parents and have traveled overseas before. The U.S. covers a swath of land very few other countries can rival. I've lived in different parts of the country, it's different and one is completely capable of getting culture shock. You think it's ridiculous for someone from rural Mississippi, Kentucky, or West Virginia if they venture to San Francisco during Pride Week? Or if a North Dakotan spent a year living in Miami?

Snarky comments like this are nothing more than your ridiculous attempt to let everyone how well-traveled you think you are. You're not being profound or insightful; you're just being a snob.
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Old 12-24-2013, 07:44 AM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,802,907 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by White Wine View Post
I hate when people make this argument, and I have immigrant parents and have traveled overseas before. The U.S. covers a swath of land very few other countries can rival. I've lived in different parts of the country, it's different and one is completely capable of getting culture shock. You think it's ridiculous for someone from rural Mississippi, Kentucky, or West Virginia if they venture to San Francisco during Pride Week? Or if a North Dakotan spent a year living in Miami?

Snarky comments like this are nothing more than your ridiculous attempt to let everyone how well-traveled you think you are. You're not being profound or insightful; you're just being a snob.
I don't think it's about being well-traveled at all. It's about being educated on the numerous cultures of your own nation; something Americans are notoriously bad at. I've met people from England who knew more about my city than people from right here in the US. That's ridiculous.
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Old 12-24-2013, 09:25 AM
 
363 posts, read 617,769 times
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For a new englander, the only places that might be a culture shock might be the south, the rural west (Wyoming, rural Colorado, Rural Southwest), and hawaii. Honestly, even in conservative Nebraska a New Englander isn't going to be shocked by our culture. Just bored
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Old 12-24-2013, 11:36 AM
 
29,944 posts, read 27,375,616 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
I don't think it's about being well-traveled at all. It's about being educated on the numerous cultures of your own nation; something Americans are notoriously bad at. I've met people from England who knew more about my city than people from right here in the US. That's ridiculous.
But I think just knowing about a city on paper is very different than experiencing it in person and that's where a bit of culture shock can come into play.
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Old 12-27-2013, 10:47 AM
 
12,117 posts, read 6,692,609 times
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The thing that many New Englanders find odd is the slower pace of many other areas of the country. It can feel like they don't care or don't try hard enough to get things done. I can understand in places like the islands the pace is slow and easy but the Midwest or California, it's hard to be patient with slow chit-chat and valley speak, especially when you are waiting in line and the cashier is moving at a snail's pace.

My friend who moved to the Midwest from MA thought the people were very kind and friendly but that they did not have the work ethic or ambition that she believed in and she ended up moving back east. New Englanders can be great people but they could definitely loosen up a bit and be friendlier and more open to strangers.
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Old 12-27-2013, 10:54 AM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,802,907 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
But I think just knowing about a city on paper is very different than experiencing it in person and that's where a bit of culture shock can come into play.
True, but taking the time to educate yourself about a place can soften the blow. I can't say that I felt any real shock my first time in New York City. I understood that I was in a completely different setting than where I came from, but I never got this overwhelming feeling of being in a "different world". The only thing that shocked me was how easy it was to get used to the place.
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Old 12-27-2013, 04:25 PM
 
5,553 posts, read 6,981,927 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tamajane View Post
My friend who moved to the Midwest from MA thought the people were very kind and friendly but that they did not have the work ethic or ambition that she believed in and she ended up moving back east. New Englanders can be great people but they could definitely loosen up a bit and be friendlier and more open to strangers.
How silly. I know many Bostonians who moved to Cincinnati to work at GE. Nearly all of them preferred Cincinnati over Boston (mainly due to the lower COL).
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Old 12-29-2013, 12:24 AM
 
29,944 posts, read 27,375,616 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
True, but taking the time to educate yourself about a place can soften the blow. I can't say that I felt any real shock my first time in New York City. I understood that I was in a completely different setting than where I came from, but I never got this overwhelming feeling of being in a "different world". The only thing that shocked me was how easy it was to get used to the place.
But consider where you're coming from--Houston, a large, diverse city, and NYC is a larger, more diverse city. But I can easily, easily, EASILY see someone from the rural South who doesn't have much experience with larger cities who could very well experience culture shock. When I first visited LA, it seemed like I was in a different country many times, although I had general knowledge of LA.

I mean you can be from Marshall, TX and read that NYC has a population density of 27,500 people per square mile and that tons of languages are spoken there, but it really doesn't mean a whole lot until you actually experience it in person. It can make your head spin.
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Old 12-29-2013, 11:14 AM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,432 posts, read 18,331,107 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenbay33 View Post
For a new englander, the only places that might be a culture shock might be the south, the rural west (Wyoming, rural Colorado, Rural Southwest), and hawaii. Honestly, even in conservative Nebraska a New Englander isn't going to be shocked by our culture. Just bored
I'm a New Englander in the Southwest. There is alarming poverty on the Navajo Res that would make anyone that's driven through it ponder their condition. Shocking? No. With what little they have many seem to be making their way to Wal-Mart in Gallup, NM to partake in the same consumer routines as the patrons of the Wal-Mart in Hilo, HI or Bangor, ME are with surrounding roads including the same Subway/Wendy's fast food element. A drive up to the rural parts in deep Maine would have the same double wide homes that are found in Raton, NM.

I am sure the streets of Mogadishu would give me a big culture shock though.
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