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Old 12-29-2013, 11:26 AM
 
82 posts, read 144,150 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by funlol View Post
If you are an American over the age of 12 and still get a culture shock traveling to other parts of the country, you probably didn't know much about our country to begin with.

If you have "culture shock" traveling within the states, try going to Pakistan, Iraq, Mongolia, North Korea, Nigeria, or something. You might have a heart attack. No wonder people say Americans are ignorant.
Not fair to call Americans ignorant. Just because someone hasn't been able to afford to travel all over the world, it doesn't make them ignorant.
I do agree with your first statement. I never knew what existed beyond Michigan. With my father in the picture, I was not allowed to do much of anything until I was married. Then I started to see what the rest of the US had to offer. Now I don't know why anyone lives in Detroit! So much beauty out there.
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Old 12-29-2013, 09:46 PM
 
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So if the OP were to hear a song sung by Madonna, Stevie Wonder, Bob Seger, Dianna Ross, or Anita Baker, would he be culturally shocked because they are singers from Michigan? Would the OP be culturally shocked driving the latest model car developed by engineers in the Detroit area? This post is absolutely ridiculous. Also the OP is concerned with the different accents in the USA. I think the OP should learn how to pronounce the word "car" properly (without that jolting God awful New England accent) before he is too concerned with other accents in the country.
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Old 12-29-2013, 10:01 PM
 
1,544 posts, read 1,513,616 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lg1985 View Post
Not fair to call Americans ignorant. Just because someone hasn't been able to afford to travel all over the world, it doesn't make them ignorant.
I do agree with your first statement. I never knew what existed beyond Michigan. With my father in the picture, I was not allowed to do much of anything until I was married. Then I started to see what the rest of the US had to offer. Now I don't know why anyone lives in Detroit! So much beauty out there.
Nobody in the Detroit area sugar coats the social problems which exist within the city limits. However, Detroit only represents only 15% of the entire Metro Detroit population. The Metro Detroit area is quite nice and upscale. Oakland country just outside of Detroit alone has over 600 lakes. Most cities would die to have the suburbs of Detroit, so save us the anti-Detroit bashing. Also, Detroit is in Michigan. So, there is a lot of beauty in Michigan. Have you been to the Western Coast of Michigan or Northern Michigan or the Upper Peninsula? You mean to tell me the sand dunes of Lake Michigan, the Sleeping Bear Dunes, Beaver Island, Mackinac Island, Grand Traverse Bay, Presque Isle and the countless coastal towns which line the 3100 miles of Michigan's coastline are not beautiful? So perhaps there are some people who would not mind living in a highly urbanized metropolitan city with all of these attractions at their footsteps. Metro Detroit comprises of many vibrant pedestrian urban areas: Ann Arbor, Plymouth, Northville, Royal Oak, Birmingham, Ferndale, Rochester, Mount Clemens, Dearborn, Wyandotte to name just a few. Only a handful of cities out there have such pedestrian downtown areas. The neighborhoods of Detroit are in shambles however the downtown central district and Midtown are being infused with hundreds of millions of dollars in developments. Do not misunderstand my posting. I am in no way downplaying the social and economic collapse of the city, but you must look at the entire metropolitan area of 4.5 million people to accurately judge it with fairness.
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Old 12-29-2013, 10:24 PM
 
1,544 posts, read 1,513,616 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tamajane View Post
The thing that many New Englanders find odd is the slower pace of many other areas of the country. It can feel like they don't care or don't try hard enough to get things done. I can understand in places like the islands the pace is slow and easy but the Midwest or California, it's hard to be patient with slow chit-chat and valley speak, especially when you are waiting in line and the cashier is moving at a snail's pace.

My friend who moved to the Midwest from MA thought the people were very kind and friendly but that they did not have the work ethic or ambition that she believed in and she ended up moving back east. New Englanders can be great people but they could definitely loosen up a bit and be friendlier and more open to strangers.

You might want to read this article.

Moderator cut: link removed, linking to competitor sites is not allowed

Last edited by Yac; 01-08-2014 at 07:19 AM..
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Old 03-03-2014, 11:39 AM
 
17 posts, read 18,897 times
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I am from Northern Westchester County, New York, and I've spent about half of my life's summers in Maine. I've also spent time in each other New England state and the part of Westchester I'm from really feels like New England in some respects. Now, I'm in my junior year of college in Minnesota, and I must say, it feels very different. There are some feelings I've had (and still have after living here for three years now) that I might consider mild culture shock. Some things are more obvious, and others took a while to discover. Some things of note:

The lack of significant hills or mountainous terrain has, believe it or not, had an effect on me. This area of Minnesota (South Central/East) has some rolling terrain, especially when compared to, say, Illinois, which is completely flat. However, it honestly feels foreign to me to have such a different topography. People kvell over how beautiful it is around here; it's mostly open fields, most cultivated but the occasional prairie undergoing restoration, and the occasional area of sort of "junky"-feeling woods. I can see how they might find it so beautiful, but for me it just doesn't really feel that way. I feel that it's very bland. When I say "junky" woods I mean they sort of feel thin and unhealthy, and consist of wimpy-looking, unimpressive trees. I compare this with the steep, rolling hills with tumbling streams, tall, old trees and impressive rock outcroppings that I've come to know at home. The stuff here just isn't the same. I'm sure if I went up to Northern Minnesota I'd feel slightly differently, but it'd still be pretty flat. Even the lakes, the 10,000+ of which Minnesota is so proud of, are a different thing here. In Maine, you can stand on the lakeshore and look across to see mountains and hills towering above you. The lakes here in Southern Minnesota feel insignificant; there's not much to see beyond the lake itself.

Something I never would have expected is that the all-familiar delicatessen (deli) is not only less common here, but my college's town doesn't even have one. Yup, you heard me, there is not a single place I can go in this town (Northfield, MN, about an hour from the Twin Cities), or within a half hour of this town, to get a nice italian hero or chicken parm sandwich. Not even the supermarket, which I'd expect to have a large case of deli meats, has nearly the selection of deli meats I'd expect to find at an A&P, Hannaford or Shaw's back east. The pizzerias are all owned by people of Greek descent, and the trend is to cut pizza in squares (yes, thin crust pizza in squares). The special at all the pizzerias is a pizza with gyro meat and tzatziki sauce to dip the pizza in. The only pizzeria in town (out of about 6) that cuts pizza into triangular slices is Domino's (and Pizza Hut). I had thought only Sicilian pizza was to be cut into squares. I guess what it boils down to is that there aren't nearly as many Italians here in Minnesota, and that makes the dining options a bit more limited, and different.

Some more minor things: When I first got to this town, none of the gas station brands were names I had ever seen before. No Shell, Mobil, Chevron, Irving, Sunoco, Citgo, Gulf, BP. Absolutely no Dunkin' Donuts. I drove here from New York, and I stopped at a Dunkin' in Wisconsin which I found out is the last Dunkin' Donuts along the I-80 and I-90 corridors (ie. there are no more of them between there and the Pacific coast). They've got some Starbucks here but Caribou seems to take the place of Dunkin. Diners are not as common. Fewer (but they certainly still exist) places to go have a good ol' bacon, eggs and coffee breakfast. New England really does that best. The residential architecture is different. Seems to me like there are some beautiful, old houses in the towns themselves (and in the twin cities), then there are trailer parks and the like, and then there are suburban-looking housing developments with brand-new looking houses. No colonials, no capes, the newer houses all seem tacky. A lot of this probably has to do with the fact that this region was simply settled later. You find towns back east that were settled in the 1600s and 1700s. Here, many were in the mid-late 1800s.

So, that is my take on Minnesota as a New York/New Englander.
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Old 03-03-2014, 01:31 PM
 
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They would have culture shock in Virginia but not Northern Virginia, same with Maryland but not any of the suburbs in MD that are part of the DC metro area. The suburbs of DC are a lot like NE.

Last edited by NOVA_guy; 03-03-2014 at 01:41 PM..
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Old 03-03-2014, 01:34 PM
 
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Hmmm. Arizona, Maryland, and Texas gives you culture shock, but not New Mexico. Interesting.
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Old 03-03-2014, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,144 posts, read 103,022,234 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Allagash19 View Post
I am from Northern Westchester County, New York, and I've spent about half of my life's summers in Maine. I've also spent time in each other New England state and the part of Westchester I'm from really feels like New England in some respects. Now, I'm in my junior year of college in Minnesota, and I must say, it feels very different. There are some feelings I've had (and still have after living here for three years now) that I might consider mild culture shock. Some things are more obvious, and others took a while to discover. Some things of note:

The lack of significant hills or mountainous terrain has, believe it or not, had an effect on me. This area of Minnesota (South Central/East) has some rolling terrain, especially when compared to, say, Illinois, which is completely flat. However, it honestly feels foreign to me to have such a different topography. People kvell over how beautiful it is around here; it's mostly open fields, most cultivated but the occasional prairie undergoing restoration, and the occasional area of sort of "junky"-feeling woods. I can see how they might find it so beautiful, but for me it just doesn't really feel that way. I feel that it's very bland. When I say "junky" woods I mean they sort of feel thin and unhealthy, and consist of wimpy-looking, unimpressive trees. I compare this with the steep, rolling hills with tumbling streams, tall, old trees and impressive rock outcroppings that I've come to know at home. The stuff here just isn't the same. I'm sure if I went up to Northern Minnesota I'd feel slightly differently, but it'd still be pretty flat. Even the lakes, the 10,000+ of which Minnesota is so proud of, are a different thing here. In Maine, you can stand on the lakeshore and look across to see mountains and hills towering above you. The lakes here in Southern Minnesota feel insignificant; there's not much to see beyond the lake itself.

Something I never would have expected is that the all-familiar delicatessen (deli) is not only less common here, but my college's town doesn't even have one. Yup, you heard me, there is not a single place I can go in this town (Northfield, MN, about an hour from the Twin Cities), or within a half hour of this town, to get a nice italian hero or chicken parm sandwich. Not even the supermarket, which I'd expect to have a large case of deli meats, has nearly the selection of deli meats I'd expect to find at an A&P, Hannaford or Shaw's back east. The pizzerias are all owned by people of Greek descent, and the trend is to cut pizza in squares (yes, thin crust pizza in squares). The special at all the pizzerias is a pizza with gyro meat and tzatziki sauce to dip the pizza in. The only pizzeria in town (out of about 6) that cuts pizza into triangular slices is Domino's (and Pizza Hut). I had thought only Sicilian pizza was to be cut into squares. I guess what it boils down to is that there aren't nearly as many Italians here in Minnesota, and that makes the dining options a bit more limited, and different.

Some more minor things: When I first got to this town, none of the gas station brands were names I had ever seen before. No Shell, Mobil, Chevron, Irving, Sunoco, Citgo, Gulf, BP. Absolutely no Dunkin' Donuts. I drove here from New York, and I stopped at a Dunkin' in Wisconsin which I found out is the last Dunkin' Donuts along the I-80 and I-90 corridors (ie. there are no more of them between there and the Pacific coast). They've got some Starbucks here but Caribou seems to take the place of Dunkin. Diners are not as common. Fewer (but they certainly still exist) places to go have a good ol' bacon, eggs and coffee breakfast. New England really does that best. The residential architecture is different. Seems to me like there are some beautiful, old houses in the towns themselves (and in the twin cities), then there are trailer parks and the like, and then there are suburban-looking housing developments with brand-new looking houses. No colonials, no capes, the newer houses all seem tacky. A lot of this probably has to do with the fact that this region was simply settled later. You find towns back east that were settled in the 1600s and 1700s. Here, many were in the mid-late 1800s.

So, that is my take on Minnesota as a New York/New Englander.
It's a take on Northfield, not all of MN. My daughter went to college in Northfield, as well. Going there from eastern Colorado, which, if left to its own devices has basically no trees, just a few willows and cottonwoods by the creeks, she felt hemmed in by the trees.

She never complained about the coffee; she liked Caribou. We don't have Dunkin' Donuts out here (they're coming, I've heard), and you can't miss what you've never had. I recall DD from somewhere that I lived, and I hardly thought they were the greatest coffee in the world. Nor did she ever complain about the pizza being cut into squares.

We lived in Albany NY (back when she was small; she doesn't remember it) and I got tired of there being *only* Capes and Colonials, with a few of those gawd-awful "raised ranches" as they call them there. We call them bi-levels, and they just look so sawed-off to me. But anyway, the main choices seemed to be center-hall colonial, side-hall colonial, or Cape.
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Old 03-03-2014, 01:51 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,482 posts, read 7,564,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOVA_guy View Post
They would have culture shock in Virginia but not Northern Virginia, same with Maryland but not any of the suburbs that are part of the DC metro area. The suburbs of DC are a lot like NE.
I would have to disagree with that to a large extent. Certainly there are similarities with a place like metro Boston insofar as they are both highly populated metro areas with a highly-educated populace working in pretty robust white-collar industries, but I think that's where the similarities end.

In terms of built environment, DC region just has a MUCH newer and honestly much sprawlier feel than anywhere in New England. Boston is just a much more contained area, and the suburbs by and large are much more bucolic and quaint (you're not going to find very much in the way of edge cities in the vain of Rosslyn or Bethesda). Although DC qualifies as East Coast, it is certainly not right on the coast like Boston, which also provides for a distinctly different feel.

It's also much more diverse (probably one of the few areas of the country where the majority of the citizens are either not native to the area and/or have very shallow generational roots) and as much less parochial feel than New England (and I don't mean that in a negative way; the lack of any parochial feel in the DC area actually makes it feel pretty generic).
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Old 03-03-2014, 02:21 PM
 
1,727 posts, read 1,386,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
I would have to disagree with that to a large extent. Certainly there are similarities with a place like metro Boston insofar as they are both highly populated metro areas with a highly-educated populace working in pretty robust white-collar industries, but I think that's where the similarities end.

In terms of built environment, DC region just has a MUCH newer and honestly much sprawlier feel than anywhere in New England. Boston is just a much more contained area, and the suburbs by and large are much more bucolic and quaint (you're not going to find very much in the way of edge cities in the vain of Rosslyn or Bethesda). Although DC qualifies as East Coast, it is certainly not right on the coast like Boston, which also provides for a distinctly different feel.

It's also much more diverse (probably one of the few areas of the country where the majority of the citizens are either not native to the area and/or have very shallow generational roots) and as much less parochial feel than New England (and I don't mean that in a negative way; the lack of any parochial feel in the DC area actually makes it feel pretty generic).
A lot of this is true. I've only been to Boston a few times but the times I've been certain aspects of it did remind me of DC. But the DC region is definitely sprawlier.
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