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Old 03-06-2014, 08:43 PM
 
Location: Colorado
1,524 posts, read 2,264,211 times
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Let me get this straight: Maryland and Delaware give this guy from Connecticut a culture shock, but New Mexico, Hawaii, and Florida don't? Must be some good stuff you're smokin'.
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Old 03-06-2014, 09:07 PM
 
Location: IN
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Most states west of the Mississippi River.
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Old 03-07-2014, 05:28 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,646,062 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
Oh please tell me you are not using Gallup as a quintessential representation of New Mexico! It's a poor town on the edge of the Navajo Res near the Arizona border so yeah it has similarities to rural parts of Northern AZ. To understand New Mexico though you have to experience Albuquerque, Santa Fe, Taos, and smaller towns like Chimayo and Truchas.

You are totally on point there with how Southwestern cities views one another. But I think Arizona and New Mexico were probably a lot more similar 102 years ago when they became the 47th and 48th states to enter the union, but in the last 60 years or so Arizona has taken in way more transplants and a lot more California influence that has changed the whole character and settlement of the state in ways that New Mexico definitely has not. New Mexico is more old school and somewhat frozen in time.

Northern New Mexico in particular has more older settlements and several generation of Spaniard and Native America ancestry. Arizona has that in spots too, but its definitely more palpable in Northern NM and they have more of an accent here as well.

Both states have pockets of liberals, libertarians, and social conservatives and have somewhat similar political climates in some ways with New Mexico leaning more center left and Arizona more to the right. The thick of where most people live in both states are pretty far removed from eachother. Phoenix/Tucson and Albuquerque /Santa Fe are have a good 6-7 hour drive away with a lot of wide open space in between.
I didn't want to base the entire state on Gallup. That is why I said "but that may not be true for the entire state". That would be like basing all of Arizona on Phoenix, which is just as terrible. Phoenix really is unlike the rest of the state by a lot. I've never been anywhere else in New Mexico, though I've always wanted to see Santa Fe. Maybe one day.

Arizona also lost a lot more of it's "history" and seems to be more Corporate America than from what I can see of New Mexico on the Internet. New Mexico kept a lot of theirs, and I applaud them for that. I wish we kept what we had. But to be fair, Arizona didn't have much of it compared to New Mexico anyway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cacto View Post
They're not that different but New Mexicans won't admit that. Put another way, if one was to ask which state is most like Arizona it would be New Mexico. The thing about the Southwest is there's been a long animosity between the urban centers in it. Unlike how Oregon and Washington are buddy-buddy (Cascadia, whatever that is) AZ and NM have always been aloof from each other. Albuquerque thinks Santa Fe is snobby, hates Phoenix, and is competitive when compared to Tucson. Tucson's whole existence seems to be based on hating Phoenix, Phoenix pretends like the other Southwest cities don't exist, and everybody bashes El Paso.
I'll agree to your thoughts on Tucson and Phoenix. Tucson and Phoenix hate each other. I won't talk about ABQ because I've never been there personally, but I'll believe you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post
Let's see, how to say this politically? From my perspective, Arizona is like California's little conservative sidekick. Arizona follows California in terms of culture and social trends, but clashes with California in terms of politics. The same parallel can be drawn between New Mexico and its neighbor Colorado.

Arizona and New Mexico differ in terms of cuisine. Arizona reinvented Mexican food by giving us cheese crisps and chimichaungas, while New Mexico reimagines Mexican food by perfecting the sopapilla and green chili sauce!
Arizona is not that conservative. There are some pockets of Arizona that have a lot of Mormons and other types of groups that lean conservative, and then Phoenix leans conservative as well which is why the state seems so red. Tucson, Flagstaff, Prescott, Sedona, Yuma, Page, and Payson, the other main population centers in the state, are all liberal as well. Tucson is more centrist, leaning left, but the others are solid blue. And then the reservations lean blue as well. But it is much more conservative than California that's for sure. Arizona is culturally aligned with California, but that's probably because the massive influx of Californians we have gotten over the past couple decades. I'm sure if that never happened, we'd be different.

I have heard about the green sauce in New Mexico. We definitely don't really have that in Arizona. It's in some places here in Tucson but very rare. Such thing isn't heard of in Phoenix really.
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Old 03-07-2014, 07:35 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,433 posts, read 18,339,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by :-D View Post
I'll agree to your thoughts on Tucson and Phoenix. Tucson and Phoenix hate each other. I won't talk about ABQ because I've never been there personally, but I'll believe you.
People in Albuquerque don't necessarily hate Phoenix. I just think it's just a twisted way the Burqueños here like to ramp up the New Mexican character and element, so they talk smack on Phoenix since its so transplant heavy. That and New Mexico is so under the radar and I'm pretty sure most Phoenicians couldn't care less what Albuquerque thinks. There are however many people in Albuquerque that find Phoenix/Scottsdale a very enjoyable place to visit, and I like it as well especially since the shopping there is head and shoulders are above ABQ by leagues. I could honesty see myself living there at some point in time. When it comes to a big city/metro areas, most people in Albuquerque would rather head up to Denver than Phoenix, and there is also a sizable Broncos fan base here as well.

I think Tucson and Albuquerque have more in common with each other than Phoenix has with either one of them. They are both medium sized desert spawlburg college towns and both are quirky and eclectic. The Mexican culture and presence is quite a bit thicker in Tucson where as Albuquerque has a larger portion of Hispanics that have been here for several generations with some dating back centuries. Cacto was totally on point when he said everyone dumps on El Paso. However the people in El Paso are probably the most outwardly friendly of any of the big Southwestern cities.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 8to32characters View Post
FWIW, there are lots and lots of New Englanders living in Arizona, New Mexico, and Colorado.

In fact, sometimes, it feels like there are more New Englanders out here than there are NY'ers/NJ folks, who seem to prefer the more cosmopolitan atmosphere of places like South Florida, Southern and Northern California, Metro Atlanta, and so on.

This leads me to believe that the priorities of New Englanders are more in line with those of Midwesterners and Upstate New Yorkers than those from the NYC/LI/NJ area. Settlement patterns in Florida illustrate this as well--New Englanders, Midwesterners, and Upstate New Yorkers tend to prefer the Gulf Coast where as the NYC-area crowd strongly prefers the area from Port St. Lucie to Miami.
I definitely agree with your first line. I've spent most of my life in Massachusetts, but Arizona, New Mexico, and Colorado are three of my favorite states. The sunny days, big blue skies, expanded horizons, and awesome sunsets are so easily adaptable. I do miss the ocean, but two years into the Southwest, It would be difficult for me to trade the climate here to go back to New England winters. I feel more adjusted and optimistic out here. When push comes to shove I'm a New Englander at heart, those traits never leaves you and if my family needed me back there I'd go back in a heartbeat and I wouldn't be too insufferable about it . But in the meantime, I'm really digging the Southwest.

Last edited by Desert_SW_77; 03-07-2014 at 08:20 PM..
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Old 03-07-2014, 10:51 PM
 
1,640 posts, read 2,050,317 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
I definitely agree with your first line. I've spent most of my life in Massachusetts, but Arizona, New Mexico, and Colorado are three of my favorite states. The sunny days, big blue skies, expanded horizons, and awesome sunsets are so easily adaptable. I do miss the ocean, but two years into the Southwest, It would be difficult for me to trade the climate here to go back to New England winters. I feel more adjusted and optimistic out here. When push comes to shove I'm a New Englander at heart, those traits never leaves you and if my family needed me back there I'd go back in a heartbeat and I wouldn't be too insufferable about it . But in the meantime, I'm really digging the Southwest.
I suppose that's where we differ because I would never go back.

Although we were both born and raised in New England, I'm willing to bet I spent significantly fewer years there than you. After all, I was only a teenager when I left.

I really disliked the depressing atmosphere fostered by the culture of pessimism/negativity. The oppressive Roman Catholic vibe wasn't my thing either.
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Old 03-10-2014, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Phoenix Arizona
2,032 posts, read 4,036,932 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by :-D View Post
I didn't want to base the entire state on Gallup. That is why I said "but that may not be true for the entire state". That would be like basing all of Arizona on Phoenix, which is just as terrible. Phoenix really is unlike the rest of the state by a lot. I've never been anywhere else in New Mexico, though I've always wanted to see Santa Fe. Maybe one day.

Arizona also lost a lot more of it's "history" and seems to be more Corporate America than from what I can see of New Mexico on the Internet. New Mexico kept a lot of theirs, and I applaud them for that. I wish we kept what we had. But to be fair, Arizona didn't have much of it compared to New Mexico anyway.

Whoa, time out. There's a whole lot of history books out there about AZ, and the history and culture persist. Look beyond PHX and Tucson or better yet, look into their origins.

I'll agree to your thoughts on Tucson and Phoenix. Tucson and Phoenix hate each other. I won't talk about ABQ because I've never been there personally, but I'll believe you.



Arizona is not that conservative. There are some pockets of Arizona that have a lot of Mormons and other types of groups that lean conservative, and then Phoenix leans conservative as well which is why the state seems so red. Tucson, Flagstaff, Prescott, Sedona, Yuma, Page, and Payson, the other main population centers in the state, are all liberal as well. Tucson is more centrist, leaning left, but the others are solid blue. And then the reservations lean blue as well. But it is much more conservative than California that's for sure. Arizona is culturally aligned with California, but that's probably because the massive influx of Californians we have gotten over the past couple decades. I'm sure if that never happened, we'd be different.

I have heard about the green sauce in New Mexico. We definitely don't really have that in Arizona. It's in some places here in Tucson but very rare. Such thing isn't heard of in Phoenix really.


Maybe you've had bad luck with good food but AZ has Sonoran Mexican food and I'd like to suggest diving into it. There's a lot of green chile sauce, red chile sauce, chiles in general, machaca, chimichanga, and big wheat tortillas to make the big burros that came out of the Sonoran. Southern AZ and Sonora in the 19th and early 20th centuries were the bread basket wheat producers for the SW with our heirloom White Sonoran Winter Wheat. Back when there was less people, pools, and golf courses, all the water went for agriculture and the desert in the winter produced tons of wheat. It's the reason Sonoran food has the big wheat tortillas. Look into Native Seed/SEARCH and it's founder, Gary Paul Nabhan, in Tucson to learn the history of food traditions in the Sonoran and check PHX New Times annual Best of PHX issue. They devote a generous portion of their restaurant section to Mexican food. By neighborhood, style, high-end or low-end, best street tacos, southern Mexico style, best chimichanga, you name it. I found a lot of awesome "Arizona" food that way. If anything, look deeper into the food and heritage if you want to find it, because it's always been there under the radar.
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Old 03-10-2014, 10:46 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,129,269 times
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What about Omaha? I went there once recently and felt fairly comfortable. I didn't really hear any accents, and was surprised at the sophistication level. I thought it was a nice area.
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Old 03-11-2014, 09:09 PM
 
Location: IN
20,852 posts, read 35,964,992 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
What about Omaha? I went there once recently and felt fairly comfortable. I didn't really hear any accents, and was surprised at the sophistication level. I thought it was a nice area.
It has become far more white collar over the past couple of decades. It has a large number of finance and accounting positions with a low cost of living. Fairly far from any other cities or desirable geographic features to go along with mediocre/bad weather. It is fairly culturally conservative even though the city votes middle of the road.
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Old 03-16-2014, 03:22 PM
 
6,611 posts, read 6,930,504 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
What about Omaha? I went there once recently and felt fairly comfortable. I didn't really hear any accents, and was surprised at the sophistication level. I thought it was a nice area.
So not hearing accents makes you feel comfortable? Hmmmm...don't leave the U.S. in that case.

It's funny to hear someone say that they don't hear accents. The mobility of Americans is amazing - people from different regions live all over the country in abundance. I fully expect to hear all kinds of accents when I visit anywhere in the U.S., not just the local one.
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Old 03-16-2014, 03:25 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,989,613 times
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Originally Posted by JoeTarheel View Post
So not hearing accents makes you feel comfortable? Hmmmm...don't leave the U.S. in that case.
Perhaps the OP should avoid a lot of eastern New England.
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