U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-02-2012, 12:19 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
4,009 posts, read 5,529,621 times
Reputation: 4547

Advertisements

St. Louis- it needs more love! There have been numerous articles in the St. Louis Post Dispatch lately talking about St. Louis wanting to attract more immigrants to help with growth.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-02-2012, 12:28 PM
 
29,973 posts, read 27,498,725 times
Reputation: 18567
Quote:
Originally Posted by LovinDecatur View Post
Certainly the Rust Belt cities like Detroit that have lost so much population over last few decades.
My first thought as well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2012, 12:40 PM
 
1,015 posts, read 1,545,231 times
Reputation: 746
Quote:
Originally Posted by glamatomic View Post
St. Louis- it needs more love! There have been numerous articles in the St. Louis Post Dispatch lately talking about St. Louis wanting to attract more immigrants to help with growth.
I don't know if it's official policy, but many in Philadelphia have said the same thing. There's a lot that's great in Philadelphia, my former home, but there are many neighborhoods that could really use immigrants (or native migrants, though they're less likely) to repopulate and revitalize them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2012, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Phoenix Arizona
2,032 posts, read 4,045,301 times
Reputation: 2699
Phoenix has been and still is, growing like crazy. It's what drives the local economy.
This is a chart of the city's growth by decade from Wiki. This doesn't include surrounding cities.
The metro pop. is closer to 3.5 million. No one makes anyone feel unwelcome, almost everyone is from somewhere else.
Historical populations
Census Pop. %
1870 240

1880 1,708 611.7%
1890 3,152 84.5%
1900 5,544 75.9%
1910 11,314 104.1%
1920 29,053 156.8%
1930 48,118 65.6%
1940 65,414 35.9%
1950 106,818 63.3%
1960 439,170 311.1%
1970 581,572 32.4%
1980 789,704 35.8%
1990 983,403 24.5%
2000 1,321,045 34.3%
2010 1,445,632 9.4%
Est. 2011 1,469,471 1.6%
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2012, 11:49 PM
 
3,152 posts, read 3,097,922 times
Reputation: 3598
Default Broadrippleguy...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Broadrippleguy View Post
Well lucky for Indy is we host some of the worlds largest sporting events annually and some other events semi-regularly.

The Circle of Lights which brings over 100,000 people to Monument Circle complete with music/shops and dancing and fireworks at the end after lighting the Circle.
Now that I think of it, your someone I see often promoting Indiana! You are very enthusiastic... is it personal or are you a real estate agent? Just curious. It's nice to really love where you live!
I live in So. California in a pretty decent area, but sometimes the traffic and COL get me down. We almost bought a condo, but chickened out. I bet we could get a nice house in Indiana huh? Oh well, Hubby loves his IT job and friends and family are here, but sometimes we wonder...

Anyway, are Indiana folks as welcoming as you are? Are sports a primary passion there? Anything else to do there? Hubby and I possess absolutely no sports genes! Nada! LOL!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-03-2012, 06:57 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,127 posts, read 35,134,347 times
Reputation: 15361
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
You constantly state Philadelphia to be provincial and not welcome to newcomers, now you say it is desperate for them.
You just don't know what to think about your former home, so long as you get your dig in. And it sure seems you think about Philly often.

Anyway, I'd think all the sunbelt cities would want to keep up the growth they've become accustomed to the last decade. Cities that are very transient in nature don't seem to mind the explosive growth.
I think what interests Sunbelt residents more is a more manageable growth rate. It's painfully obvious in many cases that infrasructure hasn't kept up with growth.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-03-2012, 07:42 AM
 
29,973 posts, read 27,498,725 times
Reputation: 18567
Quote:
Originally Posted by cacto View Post
Phoenix has been and still is, growing like crazy. It's what drives the local economy.
This is a chart of the city's growth by decade from Wiki. This doesn't include surrounding cities.
The metro pop. is closer to 3.5 million. No one makes anyone feel unwelcome, almost everyone is from somewhere else.
Historical populations
Census Pop. %
1870 240

1880 1,708 611.7%
1890 3,152 84.5%
1900 5,544 75.9%
1910 11,314 104.1%
1920 29,053 156.8%
1930 48,118 65.6%
1940 65,414 35.9%
1950 106,818 63.3%
1960 439,170 311.1%
1970 581,572 32.4%
1980 789,704 35.8%
1990 983,403 24.5%
2000 1,321,045 34.3%
2010 1,445,632 9.4%
Est. 2011 1,469,471 1.6%
I'm guessing there was a big land grab by the city in the 50's?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-04-2012, 07:04 AM
 
406 posts, read 691,002 times
Reputation: 416
Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
Most places want to see growth. Portland, Seattle, and Austin are the media darlings right now and have really marketed themselves well to young people as the hippest cities in the country. Other cities like Charlotte, Atlanta, DFW, Houston, Raleigh-Durham, and Nashville are also very popular for transplants, especially professionals with families. Oklahoma City is really trying to improve itself and market itself to transplants and its starting to show, though many people from other parts of the country haven't let go of stereotypes.

As far as places that don't want growth, I would say small cities like Little Rock. I never lived in a place with as many NIMBY's concerning new development and anti-transplant attitude as in Little Rock.
I agree with all the cities you listed that WANT growth and are trying to attract young professionals. Speaking of Little Rock, though, and cities that DON'T want to grow and retain and attract educated young people, I would put Memphis, TN at the very top of that list. In fact, the whole city is still trying to market itself and survive based off of a bunch of themes that were popular in the mid-20th century, like Elvis, Blues music, Civil Rights history, and even BBQ. Basically nothing that would attract a young person to even VISIT there, and especially not move there. It's really a shame, too, because as you said, Nashville is only 2 1/2 hours away and has definitely become THE premiere city in Tennessee for growth, young people, professionals, and transplants.

Last edited by Carlito Brigante; 12-04-2012 at 07:27 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2012, 08:05 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,844,697 times
Reputation: 11149
Quote:
Originally Posted by Broadrippleguy View Post
Well lucky for Indy is we host some of the worlds largest sporting events annually and some other events semi-regularly.
off the top of my head:
The Indianapolis 500. 400,000 people
Brickyard 400. 200,000 people total. Super weekend is near 250,000
The Red Bull Indianapolis GP 150,000
Gen Con The best 4 days in Gaming. 40-50,000 and growing.
NCAA womens and mens final fours every 5 years as part of a long term agreement with the NCAA. Which btw is headquartered in Indianapolis.
The Indianapolis colts football games.
The Pacers.
Big Ten national championship which was held yesterday in Lucas Oil Stadium.
Super Bowl XLVI *46* which was regarded as one of the best Super Bowls ever. google Indianapolis hosting Super Bowl 46 and see all the rave reviews for yourself. over 110 million people saw videos of Indianapolis and over 150,000 people attended Downtown Indianapolis over the 10 days that drove from 50 miles or more.
The Indiana State Fair
The Indianapolis Monumental Marathon which this year replaced the New York City marathon due to it being cancled. many runners swiched over to Indy because of Hurricane Sandy which is a bonus it also qualifies for the Boston Marathon.
The Circle of Lights which brings over 100,000 people to Monument Circle complete with music/shops and dancing and fireworks at the end after lighting the Circle.
...thus proving Kyle's point.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2012, 11:09 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,068,409 times
Reputation: 4488
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShaunJuan View Post
I agree with all the cities you listed that WANT growth and are trying to attract young professionals. Speaking of Little Rock, though, and cities that DON'T want to grow and retain and attract educated young people, I would put Memphis, TN at the very top of that list. In fact, the whole city is still trying to market itself and survive based off of a bunch of themes that were popular in the mid-20th century, like Elvis, Blues music, Civil Rights history, and even BBQ. Basically nothing that would attract a young person to even VISIT there, and especially not move there. It's really a shame, too, because as you said, Nashville is only 2 1/2 hours away and has definitely become THE premiere city in Tennessee for growth, young people, professionals, and transplants.
That is a shame about Memphis. Young people like urban environments and I personally think Memphis feels very urban for its size, much more so than Nashville which is very suburban and sprawly. It is very historic and they can/should capitalize on that. It shouldn't ditch the Blues music, Elvis, and BBQ because that's what Memphis is known for, but it could very easily market its urbanity to young people. New Orleans hasn't ditched Jazz culture even though Jazz hasn't been popular for over 50 years. People go there for the culture and vibe. Beale St is a very unique entertainment district. I think what Memphis has going against it is its crime and urban decay. If the city would clean that up, I think it could easily turn itself around. I wouldn't mind living there if it was a safer city.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top