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Old 12-06-2012, 10:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MiamiRob View Post
1: New York | 3,073,800
2: Florida | 2,999,862
3: Texas | 2,979,598
4: Georgia | 2,950,435
5: California | 2,299,072
6: N. Carolina| 2,048,628
7: Illinois | 1,866,414
8: Maryland | 1,700,298
9: Virginia | 1,551,399
10: Louisiana | 1,452,396

Source : List of U.S. states by African-American population - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

What surprised me the most on this list is Florida at #2. Mostly because even though the state was the third to secede the Union before it joined the US, Florida was attracting a large number of Africans and African Americans from British-occupied North America who sought freedom from slavery.
Once in Florida, the Spanish Crown converted them to Roman Catholicism and gave them freedom. Those ex-slaves settled in a community north of St. Augustine, called Gracia Real de Santa Teresa de Mose, the first freedom settlement of its kind in what became the United States. Many of those slaves were also welcomed by Creek and Seminole Native Americans who had established settlements there at the invitation of the Spanish government.

Florida doesn't have much of a past with slavery since it joined the Union as a slave state in 1845. Legal Slavery lasted less than two decades in Florida so it doesn't have that same Confederacy association with slavery. You don't see monuments scattered to the Confederacy across the state like you do in other Southern states.
Actually, I believe the Seminoles got their name from a corruption of a Spanish word that means "runaway" or "wild one". This is interesting given that the group was formed from a combination of Native groups(mostly Creek) and former slaves. Some view them as a tri racial isolate similar to the Lumbee of NC(mostly in Robeson County). There are other examples of this as well.
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Old 12-07-2012, 06:41 AM
 
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I wonder if the OP is curious as to why didn't all (or more) blacks leaved the South if so many vestiges of the old slave regime are present in politics and society?
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Old 12-07-2012, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
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Originally Posted by thriftylefty View Post
I wonder if the OP is curious as to why didn't all (or more) blacks leaved the South if so many vestiges of the old slave regime are present in politics and society?
Yes, that is more or less the basis of the question. People keep stating the obvious, that all blacks lived in the south 150 years ago because of slavery. Well, it's been 150 years and the majority of the black population still lives in the southern states.
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Old 12-07-2012, 03:19 PM
 
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Originally Posted by thriftylefty View Post
I wonder if the OP is curious as to why didn't all (or more) blacks leaved the South if so many vestiges of the old slave regime are present in politics and society?
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Old 12-07-2012, 03:34 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
Yes, that is more or less the basis of the question. People keep stating the obvious, that all blacks lived in the south 150 years ago because of slavery. Well, it's been 150 years and the majority of the black population still lives in the southern states.
Its a very good question. I think the answer lies outside of the realm of history ,sociology, or economics.
When I drive to parts of the US an see people living in squalor and think if they filled their car up with gas and saved a little money they could improve their lives immensely by just driving a few hundred miles in any direction.

Slavery is study in this phenomena. As easy as it was to escape with the underground railroad, sympathizers and abolitionist every where, very few slaves left the Plantation. Harriet Tubman said something to the effect that she had to convince people that they were indeed slaves before she could get them to leave.

Maybe the answer is in spirituality or the ability of humans to endure. I would go a step further and add that suffering is a basic tenet of most religions. The more blacks suffered the more religious they became. The South is the homeland of black religion. The South could be the mecca or Jerusalem of black people.
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Old 12-07-2012, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,514 posts, read 9,063,864 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thriftylefty View Post
Its a very good question. I think the answer lies outside of the realm of history ,sociology, or economics.
When I drive to parts of the US an see people living in squalor and think if they filled their car up with gas and saved a little money they could improve their lives immensely by just driving a few hundred miles in any direction.

Slavery is study in this phenomena. As easy as it was to escape with the underground railroad, sympathizers and abolitionist every where, very few slaves left the Plantation. Harriet Tubman said something to the effect that she had to convince people that they were indeed slaves before she could get them to leave.

Maybe the answer is in spirituality or the ability of humans to endure. I would go a step further and add that suffering is a basic tenet of most religions. The more blacks suffered the more religious they became. The South is the homeland of black religion. The South could be the mecca or Jerusalem of black people.
A most interesting point of view.
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Old 12-07-2012, 04:15 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
Yes, that is more or less the basis of the question. People keep stating the obvious, that all blacks lived in the south 150 years ago because of slavery. Well, it's been 150 years and the majority of the black population still lives in the southern states.
And most Italian Americans immigrated to the northeastern U.S. around 100 years ago or so and are still mainly concentrated in that part of the country. The Scots-Irish immigrated in large numbers to Appalachia and most are still in Appalachia. Scandinavian Americans are still largely confined to the Upper Midwest, long after the first immigrants arrived. Blacks aren't some sort of anomaly as you're making us out to be and I'm puzzled by your entire train of thought on the matter.
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Old 12-07-2012, 04:46 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
And most Italian Americans immigrated to the northeastern U.S. around 100 years ago or so and are still mainly concentrated in that part of the country. The Scots-Irish immigrated in large numbers to Appalachia and most are still in Appalachia. Scandinavian Americans are still largely confined to the Upper Midwest, long after the first immigrants arrived. Blacks aren't some sort of anomaly as you're making us out to be and I'm puzzled by your entire train of thought on the matter.
Not only this, but NY State is an example of a unique Black experience in that it had slavery until 1827 and had more slaves than GA at one point. Ironically, there is a strong Underground RR history, had many Black migrants/immigrants and has the highest Black population for a state currently. So, it has a history that runs the gamut and some other Northeastern states have a similar history.
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Old 12-07-2012, 05:33 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Not only this, but NY State is an example of a unique Black experience in that it had slavery until 1827 and had more slaves than GA at one point. Ironically, there is a strong Underground RR history, had many Black migrants/immigrants and has the highest Black population for a state currently. So, it has a history that runs the gamut and some other Northeastern states have a similar history.
Can't rep you right now, but good stuff!

The fact of the matter is that Blacks have one of the broadest historic migratory patterns of ethnic/ancestral groups in America. We have a significant presence in both rural and urban areas in the South and in practically all of the major metros (1 million+) throughout the country, the PNW being the biggest exception.
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Old 12-09-2012, 02:48 PM
 
1,807 posts, read 2,534,101 times
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Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
Are you guys forgetting the civil war was 150 years ago? You're not giving it enough thought. All the blacks in California and Washington had no ancestors living there in the 1800's, their families moved and migrated there over the last century. I'm asking why some families did and some did not. Thought people could take the question seriously and think a little deeper, not just the surface facts we all know about the history of the south. Great job.
I don't know if anybody answered your question to your satisfaction, and I'm not really interested in reading through 10+ pages of responses, BUT...

...keep in mind that the general trend of the Great Migration was for families to travel to wherever fare was the cheapest, which was typically wherever was geographically closest. I think you would find that in Chicago, many of the African-American families have their roots in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee (Richard Wright's family, for instance, famously traveled from a small town in Mississippi, to Memphis, and on to Chicago), whereas in Pittsburgh or Baltimore, many of the families have their roots in Virginia or the Carolinas. This is true in California, as well. This is also why cities that are very far north usually do not have as large of African-American populations. Minneapolis, for instance, while having a rich African-American history (Dred Scott lived in Minnesota territory as a former slave), did not receive African-American migrants en masse until those families began to leave Chicago and St. Louis in the Second Great Migration, and that is reflected in its demographics today. Boston, while having perhaps the richest history of a black middle-class in the country, did not receive large numbers of migrants like Baltimore, DC, and Philly did. Seattle and Portland, which are geographically about as far as you can get from the Deep South, still have very small African-American populations, compared to similarly sized cities.

Why are the majority of African-Americans still in the South, though? Well, first of all, I'm not quite sure that they are. As somebody correctly pointed out, there may be a greater gross number of African-Americans in the North, but since northern states were traditionally more populous, they are reflected as a smaller share of the population than in the southern states. However, certainly some stayed because they did not have the means to leave, and probably more than a few did not want to move to a northern climate, or into the uncertainty of whether they would procure housing and jobs. There has also been a wave of migration of African-Americans from urban centers in the North, back to the South, as well as a wave of African-American migrants from the rural south into its big cities (like Atlanta) that is reflective of a general "rural flight" phenomenon across the US...
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