U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-05-2012, 12:05 PM
 
1,298 posts, read 984,056 times
Reputation: 658

Advertisements

I've seen a few discussions about which city is "hillier" than which other city. What becomes obvious quickly is that the word "hilly" is very hard to define. Here's a few options... which of these most signifies a "hilly" city to you?

1. Many small, dense hills, fully developed upon, with very little flat area. Altitude range is not relevant.
2. Taller hills than #1, but fewer. Altitude range is relevant.
3. A flat or rolling city with undeveloped areas of small mountains, tall hills or rugged terrain inside city limits.
4. A sloping city with wide altitude range from one side of the metro to the other, but not much variation in topography otherwise.

Add some of your own if I left anything out. But this should at least suffice to explain why it's so difficult to determine which city deserves "hilliest city" status.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-05-2012, 08:36 PM
 
Location: 304
4,979 posts, read 6,538,647 times
Reputation: 1610
Hilly city/town to me (being from WV) would be one that is built on a hillside or between two or multiple hills. I think in order for the city/town to be considered hilly, development must be on the hills, and there must be alot of hills.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-06-2012, 07:40 AM
 
5,419 posts, read 8,210,342 times
Reputation: 4518
I'd do a combo of 1 and 2. I would look for denser development( >5 units/acre ) and possibly commercial development on the hillsides. Think Seattle, SF, and Pgh.

This needs to be the dominant type of development in the city core.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-14-2012, 11:51 AM
 
510 posts, read 740,371 times
Reputation: 282
I use the manual transmission method. The more you swear you will buy an automatic, the hillier the city might be. Seattle isn't exactly a fun place to drive stick for normal driving. But oddly enough is fun when wanting to really play with the car.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-16-2012, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,067,015 times
Reputation: 993
IMO, what makes a city the hilliest is the predominance of hills in it...in other words, if 80% of the city is hilly, I'll call it more hilly than a city that has just one large hill.

The next part of it is the steepness of those hills. With this in mind, I consider the following cities to be among the hilliest in the U.S...Seattle, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Pittsburgh, and Nashville.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-17-2012, 07:24 AM
 
5,419 posts, read 8,210,342 times
Reputation: 4518
Coming from Knoxville I just don't see Nashville as hilly. Sure there are some hilly neighborhoods but the vast majority of the city is less than 8% slope.

Downtown is on a hill - they probably built it there to avoid flooding.

There are hills in the suburban areas but they aren't developed as densely as the flatter areas. Maybe 1-2 houses/acre at most.

Funny - the transmission issue never bothered me though I notice I have gone through quite a few clutches over the years. Still worked out less than an automatic transmission rebuild. The exception is my 20 yr old saturn - a clutch rebuild is more than the car is worth!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-17-2012, 07:54 AM
 
3,645 posts, read 8,650,082 times
Reputation: 1787
Quote:
Originally Posted by creeksitter View Post
Coming from Knoxville I just don't see Nashville as hilly. Sure there are some hilly neighborhoods but the vast majority of the city is less than 8% slope.

Downtown is on a hill - they probably built it there to avoid flooding.

There are hills in the suburban areas but they aren't developed as densely as the flatter areas. Maybe 1-2 houses/acre at most.

Funny - the transmission issue never bothered me though I notice I have gone through quite a few clutches over the years. Still worked out less than an automatic transmission rebuild. The exception is my 20 yr old saturn - a clutch rebuild is more than the car is worth!
Nashville's city limits are huge, so technically much of the city is very hilly, but the areas that are actually urban aren't that hilly.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-18-2012, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Central Connecticut
576 posts, read 983,801 times
Reputation: 195
I seen many of that here in Conn, Mass, NY and PA. Either small or large city... I notice in the Bronx can get hilly, too.

I would choose Pittsburgh. But then I am not 100% on it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-18-2012, 08:22 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
7,653 posts, read 14,758,210 times
Reputation: 6644
Duluth has the widest elevation range of any city its size or larger east of the Mississippi (about 600' to 1400'+) as far as I know, perhaps besides West Virginia. It is built on a southwest-northeast hill.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-20-2012, 12:05 PM
 
1,298 posts, read 984,056 times
Reputation: 658
Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post
Duluth has the widest elevation range of any city its size or larger east of the Mississippi (about 600' to 1400'+) as far as I know, perhaps besides West Virginia. It is built on a southwest-northeast hill.
It's an interesting decision to peg Duluth as EAST of the Mississippi River. You might say it straddles the fence, but if you had to pick one or the other, the state of Minnesota would have to be considered WEST of the river, and Duluth as a city is further west than most of the river itself (if you take the whole thing into account.)

Do the residents of Duluth generally consider themselves to be one or the other?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top