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Old 12-07-2012, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,310,239 times
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I pretty much link anything on the West Coast to the Sun Belt anyways, since they all seem to grow like Sun Belt cities and all are equally as popular places to relocate away from the "bad weather" (ironic to me considering I don't categorize overcast drizzle -- or stifling oppressive heat for that matter -- as "good weather").
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Old 12-07-2012, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Northridge, Los Angeles, CA
2,685 posts, read 6,355,288 times
Reputation: 2356
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
In 50 years the majority of Americans will live in the South and NOTHING is going to change that.
The South currently has 114 million people, while the United States population is around 310 million. Currently, this means that the South has 36.7% of all people living in the United States.

http://www.census.gov/prod/2010pubs/p25-1138.pdf (refer to page 10)

The United States is slated to have 439 million people by 2050. For the South to have a majority of the people, the South will have to contain 219.5 million people, or literally account for 105.5 million out of the 129 million people that the US is going to grow by.

So, where are all these people going to come from? You're suggesting that a whopping 81.7% of all population growth in the US will only happen to the South.

Resident Population Data - 2010 Census

You understand how there isn't any data that actually supports that conclusion, correct?
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Old 12-07-2012, 11:27 AM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,422 posts, read 18,313,139 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
I pretty much link anything on the West Coast to the Sun Belt anyways, since they all seem to grow like Sun Belt cities and all are equally as popular places to relocate away from the "bad weather" (ironic to me considering I don't categorize overcast drizzle -- or stifling oppressive heat for that matter -- as "good weather").
Have you been to Seattle or Portland? I don't see any parallels or similararies in growth patterns between NW cities and Sunbelt cities like Phoenix, Dallas, or Orlando. Northwestern cities have very different types of urban planning.
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Old 12-07-2012, 03:39 PM
 
1,189 posts, read 1,808,378 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
In 50 years the majority of Americans will live in the South and NOTHING is going to change that.
Are you sure about that chief? Millions moved north for jobs and now millions are moving south. See a pattern. In the past 100 years americans are constantly immigrating either north, south or west. Besides do you really think properity last forever? sure these cities will exist as major center in 50 years but they will probably be lost to the next big thing. Americans always move to the cheapest spot or the place with the most jobs and once people move into 1 area, it gets expensive to maintain and people leave. Not to metion the south has some serious water issues, even in Atlanta, Orlando and Charlotte.
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Old 12-07-2012, 04:31 PM
 
Location: Seattle
115 posts, read 160,673 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amercity View Post
Not to metion the south has some serious water issues, even in Atlanta, Orlando and Charlotte.
Which leads me to ask: How can the Southwest Sunbelt cities continue to grow at the current rate? Won't eventual water restrictions slow down the growth of cities such as Phoenix, Las Vegas, Tucson, Albuquerque and the SoCal metros? I mean, where is all this swimming pool and golf course water going to come from? Keeps your paws off our Columbia River!
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Old 12-07-2012, 05:45 PM
 
Location: IN
20,845 posts, read 35,927,262 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
I think you are right since that appears to be where the jobs are and the COL is reasonable. The weather seems to be more to peoples' liking too.
The Sunbelt is already running into limits with regard to population growth vs not enough water. This will be an ENORMOUS problem in the very near future, likely in the next 10 years with the way the average temperatures continue to warm. Oh, Texas and other parts of the Sunbelt have brutal heat and a very high sun angle- so it will be even more prone to see frequent droughts.
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Old 12-07-2012, 05:48 PM
 
Location: IN
20,845 posts, read 35,927,262 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
Better way to say what I was thinking. It might be the new place to be but please check the weather. Don't think it will ever be considered the "sunbelt."

It has a very similar latitude to northwestern Europe so the sun angle is more tolerable, particularly those who don't tolerate harsh sunlight well. I have northern European ancestry and I generally prefer latitudes well above 42N. That generally elminates the southern 2/3 to 3/4 of the US, unless I have to relocate for job reasons.
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Old 12-07-2012, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,310,239 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
Have you been to Seattle or Portland? I don't see any parallels or similararies in growth patterns between NW cities and Sunbelt cities like Phoenix, Dallas, or Orlando. Northwestern cities have very different types of urban planning.
I do.
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Old 12-07-2012, 08:17 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,422 posts, read 18,313,139 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
I do.
Such as? Any poignant examples? Between Seattle and Dallas? Portland and Orlando?
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Old 12-07-2012, 08:26 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,648,620 times
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I started a post as to why I do not think Portland is going to be the next sunbelt type of city but zapped it because I know I will get arguments from people who don't live here but are true believers of the hype. So suffice it to say I do live here and I do not believe it will be so.

In fact, the way things are going here now, I believe just the opposite will occur. I will be happy to debate the issue with anyone who does live here though.
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