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Old 12-08-2012, 07:23 PM
 
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Where in the United States is the line above where the chance of snowfall in a given winter is above 50 percent and where the chance of snow below the line is below 50 percent?
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Old 12-09-2012, 10:14 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
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There are probably no states where there won't be any snow somewhere in the state and that includes Hawaii, which does get snow every winter and has glaciers. Florida can be counted on to get snow at some location in the state during many years. The southernmost beach towns probably won't get snow, but I have seen snow in San Diego,
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Old 12-09-2012, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Baybie Alyssa View Post
Where in the United States is the line above where the chance of snowfall in a given winter is above 50 percent and where the chance of snow below the line is below 50 percent?
There wouldn't be a line (there would be several lines, and several circles), but for ultimate simplicity's sake it'd probably follow I-5 on the west and I-40 on the south (though the San Gabriel/San Bernardino Mountains outside Los Angeles are guaranteed to get it every year, and you'd want to move the I-5 line east to the Sierra Nevada & Cascades the whole way up, and the I-40 line might swing down and grab Dallas after Amarillo, and follow I-30 up to Little Rock).

Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
but I have seen snow in San Diego,
great article here: SignOnSanDiego.com > News > Metro -- The day it snowed in San Diego
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Old 12-09-2012, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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I think your parameters need to be more reality-based. I think even Dallas and Atlanta get at least one snow in more than half of all winters, but it is usually so insignificant as to not be meaningful. Often, it is just snow in the air that does not accumulate on the ground.

You would have to define "meaningful snow", such as a snowfall that leaves a persistent ground cover for more than a day, and then you will need to find data that defines snow in the same way.

In any case, your line of substantial snow cover would be altitude driven, dipping south as far as Ashefille NC and El Paso TX in higher elevations. It would even cross into Mexico, where there is a snow ground cover almost every year in Sonora and Chihuahua.

This map is not exactly what you're looking for, but will give a rough idea of where such a line might be

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Un...l_snowfall.jpg

Depending on how you define a qualifying snow event, your line would probably be through the middle of the medium-gray shading. It probably snows almost every year in the light gray, and almost never in the dark gray.

Last edited by jtur88; 12-09-2012 at 10:52 AM..
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Old 12-09-2012, 12:31 PM
 
Location: Michigan
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The only major city not to have never recorded any snowfall in the whole US is Miami. I'm quite surprised that the Dakotas don't get as much snow as you'd think they would.
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Old 12-09-2012, 01:01 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
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Quote:
Originally Posted by animatedmartian View Post
The only major city not to have never recorded any snowfall in the whole US is Miami. I'm quite surprised that the Dakotas don't get as much snow as you'd think they would.
But that is only since record keeping started there, what, a little over 100 years? I don't think it would *shock* anybody if Miami actually did get snow one day from a freak event.

NYC hadn't had a big hurricane for 70+ years, then bam.

this map might be interesting...

http://www.islandnet.com/~see/weathe...echristmas.gif
noaa.gov

Last edited by JMT; 12-10-2012 at 11:38 AM..
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Old 12-09-2012, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grapico View Post
But that is only since record keeping started there, what, a little over 100 years? I don't think it would *shock* anybody if Miami actually did get snow one day from a freak event.

NYC hadn't had a big hurricane for 70+ years, then bam.

this map might be interesting...


noaa.gov
This doesn't mean it won't snow during the other days of the winter.
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Old 12-09-2012, 10:20 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
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I would say a line through Atlanta, Birmingham, Dallas and north would have at least a 50% chance of snow every winter. Get north of the Ohio river and I would say your gauranteed to see at least some snow every winter. Very very little of the US avoids cold weather all together. ( south florida, south texas, California and hawaii) That being said very little of the US sees REAL snow every year either. Only in far north places like NE, upstate NY, Mi, Wi, Mn and the mountain west is there real snow. Most places get a few inches and then it melts in a day or two.
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Old 12-10-2012, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
I would say a line through Atlanta, Birmingham, Dallas and north would have at least a 50% chance of snow every winter. Get north of the Ohio river and I would say your gauranteed to see at least some snow every winter. Very very little of the US avoids cold weather all together. ( south florida, south texas, California and hawaii) That being said very little of the US sees REAL snow every year either. Only in far north places like NE, upstate NY, Mi, Wi, Mn and the mountain west is there real snow. Most places get a few inches and then it melts in a day or two.
I would argue that I-80 is a pretty good southern boundary for the parts of the country that get snow like this. Thaws are few and far between, although as of late, the climate has been acting pretty crazy. Winters and summers are getting more and more bizarre.
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Old 12-13-2012, 04:28 PM
 
97 posts, read 157,418 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
I think your parameters need to be more reality-based. I think even Dallas and Atlanta get at least one snow in more than half of all winters, but it is usually so insignificant as to not be meaningful. Often, it is just snow in the air that does not accumulate on the ground.

You would have to define "meaningful snow", such as a snowfall that leaves a persistent ground cover for more than a day, and then you will need to find data that defines snow in the same way.

In any case, your line of substantial snow cover would be altitude driven, dipping south as far as Ashefille NC and El Paso TX in higher elevations. It would even cross into Mexico, where there is a snow ground cover almost every year in Sonora and Chihuahua.

This map is not exactly what you're looking for, but will give a rough idea of where such a line might be

File:United states average annual snowfall.jpg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Depending on how you define a qualifying snow event, your line would probably be through the middle of the medium-gray shading. It probably snows almost every year in the light gray, and almost never in the dark gray.
Yes, at least one accumulating snowfall every 2 years. These are the parameters.
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