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Old 12-17-2013, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Calera, AL
1,165 posts, read 1,445,029 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghengis View Post
LOL, says the guy from Alabama
Really? Don't judge a book by its cover. I spent about 80% of my life in the Midwest so I think I have a fairly good idea what constitutes as being culturally Midwestern and what doesn't.
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Old 12-17-2013, 04:32 PM
 
2,199 posts, read 2,321,739 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sean33 View Post
My list:

12 Kansas the other state I haven't been to. Like Missouri I'm guessing it's too Bible Belt for my tastes; the thing that comes to my mind are school boards trying to get the districts to teach intelligent design and other nonsense. I know Kansas is hardly alone in this, so I know I'm not giving the state a fair shake. I'm sure there are wonderful qualities to the state and I'll get there someday to see it myself.
Its very like Nebraska, both in terms of its isolated belts of very beautiful scenery (though Kansas has prettier swaths than the Sand Hills, they aren't as extensive) as well as its cultural and social make-up. Omaha is better than Wichita by a long shot, though KC really serves as Kansas's "big" city, and KC is like a bigger, better Omaha. Lawrence trumps Lincoln for flagship college town. Lincoln trumps Topeka for capitol city. Beirock is a better word for the food than Runza.

Verdict: personal preference, but more or less a tie.
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Old 12-18-2013, 05:35 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
3,077 posts, read 5,452,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fezzador View Post
Really? Don't judge a book by its cover. I spent about 80% of my life in the Midwest so I think I have a fairly good idea what constitutes as being culturally Midwestern and what doesn't.
I think he was referring to the fact that you said the midwestern parts of the Dakotas were "nothing to write home about" while Alabama is not all that interesting either.
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Old 12-18-2013, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,319,838 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chessgeek View Post
Lawrence is the only city I would go out of my way to visit in Kansas. It also is only a short drive to Kansas City, MO (approx 30 miles or so). You were kind of hard on Nebraska there...it does have Omaha and Lincoln. I would agree it should not be in the top 5 of Midwest states, but it certainly rates above North Dakota and at least even with South Dakota. I agree that Wisconsin, Michigan and Minnesota should be the top three choices!
That's true, it has Omaha. Without Omaha though it's very hard to love. Same with Kansas, but it has KC and that saves it from being last. The Dakotas are the opposite: they have few interesting cities but can be awe-inspiringly beautiful in places.
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Old 12-18-2013, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,514 posts, read 9,061,738 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghengis View Post
LOL, says the guy from Alabama
I don't know what being from Alabama has to do with it. There is a LOT more going on in Alabama than there is in South Dakota.

Alabama has a small but beautiful coastline along the Gulf of Mexico. Better beaches and warmer waters than pretty much any midwest state, just not as many beaches.

Mobile is a fine coastal city. As I recall, it's actually the city that Mardis Gras orginated in. Birmingham is Alabama's pride, over 1 million people in the metro, larger than the entire state of South Dakota. Then of course you have the space shuttle presence up in Huntsville, and not to mention one of the greatest college football teams of our time, University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa.

I'm sorry, why is it funny to laugh at Alabama again? It stacks up better than any of the Great Plains states, and could go toe to toe with a few midwest states.
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Old 12-18-2013, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,514 posts, read 9,061,738 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michigan83 View Post
I think he was referring to the fact that you said the midwestern parts of the Dakotas were "nothing to write home about" while Alabama is not all that interesting either.
Alabama has a lot more to "write home about" than does South Dakota. If you guys want to start an Alabama vs South Dakota thread it'd be no contest, so let's not go there. And honestly, South Dakota isn't even part of the midwest. It's a great plains states, separate area of the country.
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Old 12-18-2013, 10:08 AM
 
Location: Maryland
4,267 posts, read 5,484,228 times
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1a) Illinois: Chicago is, in my opinion, the best city in the Midwest, and one of the few cities in the Midwest I would want to live permanently. I love how integrated the city uses its lakefront access. Chicago's cultural and nightlife attractions are really great, and it has the most extensive and useful public transit access of any city in the Midwest. I think the driftless region in the NW of the state, the Mississippi and Illinois river bluffs, and the Shawnee National Forest are really underrated by most people and are very beautiful. I even find something oddly beautiful about the prairie/corn fields in the center of the state that let you see for miles, although it's a bit monotonous and boring at times, but it makes for great sunsets.
1b) Wisconsin: I love Madison, and I think northern Wisconsin is beautiful. Milwaukee's okay, but I'd rather live in Madison and visit Milwaukee frequently.
2a) Minnesota: the Twin cities are really nice, but the public transit there really leaves something to be desired and is a negative, in my opinion. The Twin cities also go through some pretty extreme weather from brutally cold in the winter to hot and muggy in the summer. The northern part of the state is really beautiful, but most of the area around the southern portion of the Twin cities and south is nothing really different than the rest of the Midwest.
2b) Michigan: the most beautiful state in the Midwest, in my opinion. However, I find it difficult to imagine living in Detroit, and I don't think the rest of the cities in the state are big enough for my tastes.
3) Missouri: probably the second-most beautiful state in the Midwest, and I like St. Louis a lot. A bit too hot and muggy in the summer for my tastes.

The rest of the states in the Midwest don't really do much for me, so after that I'd rather live in a different location in the country.
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Old 12-18-2013, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Calera, AL
1,165 posts, read 1,445,029 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
I don't know what being from Alabama has to do with it. There is a LOT more going on in Alabama than there is in South Dakota.

Alabama has a small but beautiful coastline along the Gulf of Mexico. Better beaches and warmer waters than pretty much any midwest state, just not as many beaches.

Mobile is a fine coastal city. As I recall, it's actually the city that Mardis Gras orginated in. Birmingham is Alabama's pride, over 1 million people in the metro, larger than the entire state of South Dakota. Then of course you have the space shuttle presence up in Huntsville, and not to mention one of the greatest college football teams of our time, University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa.

I'm sorry, why is it funny to laugh at Alabama again? It stacks up better than any of the Great Plains states, and could go toe to toe with a few midwest states.
The funny thing is, the far western part of the Dakotas (the most sparsely populated portions) are the only parts worth comparing to Alabama. The Black Hills are very picturesque - probaby more scenic than anything in Alabama (except possibly the Gulf) and about on par with the Smokies and Blue Ridge Mountains. Economically, particularly in North Dakota, there's the oil boom, which Alabama simply has no answer to.

The eastern part of the Dakotas is where approximately 70% of the population lives, but the towns have much less character and history than many of its Old West counterparts. Fargo is an okay city, sort of like a cleaner, less-diverse Montgomery. Sioux Falls is the largest city in South Dakota, but unlike Fargo there's not even a hint of urbanity. It's one big suburb of 180k smack dab in the middle of the prairie. In fact, in a way, it kind-of, sort-of feels like a detached suburb of Minneapolis-St. Paul.

Birmingham isn't a particularly interesting city (no truly unique landmarks, no major league teams, good regional hub but not a national one), but it is at least historic (for both good and bad). The city's strength lies in its suburbs. The only Great Plains city I can think of that can be really compared to B-ham is Omaha. If you're talking cities-proper only, Omaha blows Birmingham out of the water, as it's a much safer and less expensive place to live (try the sales tax in Birmingham - 10%!), much less corruption among the city administration, arguably nicer airport, much better public schools, much better zoo, etc. Omaha's weakness is its sub-par suburbs. Bellevue and Papillion are probably Omaha's best suburbs (Council Bluffs is the biggest suburb of the metro, but many Omahanians treat it like a red-headed stepchild), but they have absolutely nothing on Hoover, Mountain Brook, Homewood, or Vestavia. These suburbs have an insane amount of wealthy and highly-educated folks living there (very high proportion of millionaires and Ph.Ds/M.D.s, and not coincidentally many of those folks are one and the same) and of course you still have plenty of the old money going on. Though the Alabama education system is often maligned, even the public schools of those suburbs are some of the finest in the region. If you look at the metros as a whole, it's pretty much a draw.
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Old 12-19-2013, 01:37 PM
 
217 posts, read 235,561 times
Reputation: 198
I consider Oklahoma Midwest...........
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Old 12-19-2013, 03:04 PM
 
12,698 posts, read 10,514,849 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Juice Malone View Post
I consider Oklahoma Midwest...........
I've always considered Oklahoma midwestern. But I understand it's a border state that is technically considered southern.

The only midwestern states I've been to are Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois. Of those, I choose Illinois. I would like to go to Wisconsin and Minnesota.
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