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Old 12-23-2012, 12:13 AM
 
Location: Baghdad by the Bay (San Francisco, California)
3,530 posts, read 4,262,305 times
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Texas is indeed diverse, but its diversity is spread out across hundreds of miles. You can drive for five hours and only change elevation about 200' in the parts where most people live, the vast majority of that being pretty monotonous prairie and coastal plains.

People who try to use charts and numbers to rank Texas anywhere near California in this respect must have never been to Northern California. Surely, you have never seen 350 foot redwoods, then driven 30 minutes into the middle of a dense world city. Or, 15 minutes in the other direction and be on a rocky shoreline with 10 ft waves crashing against cliff sides. Or, 30 minutes another direction into grassy foothills, mountains and dramatic temperature and rainfall differences (just perfect for grape production) of the corresponding valleys. Or, continued on another three hours and been in rugged, alpine mountain territory, where snow capped peaks can last year-round and deep mountain lakes are crystal clear (naturally occurring lakes, mind you (Texas only has one murky natural lake and it's located all the way over on the Eastern side). Or, turn south into the Central Valley where hundreds of miles of the most fertile farm land in the country wedge between the country's most breathtaking national park, and a green, forested coastal mountain range. Or, continued on into the middle of a barren desert, with blowing sand dunes and salt flats.

All of these dramatically different landscapes are contained in an area equal to the driving time between Beaumont and Waco, an area that offers little more than the endless prairie, brown rivers and coastline and pine forests. Like I said, I agree that Texas is diverse, but it's just not in California's league. This state is amazing and its diversity is near where the people actually live.

Some of you guys need to stop searching Wikipedia for charts for your opinions and travel a bit.
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Old 12-23-2012, 02:12 AM
 
Location: Pacific NW
6,413 posts, read 10,383,045 times
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Well, if we're going to talk ecoregions ... in descending order, the top ten (one caveat being I could find no data on Arizona):

CA: 13 level III ecoregions and 180 level IV ecoregions
MT: 10 level III ecoregions and 85 level IV ecoregions
WA: 10 level III ecoregions and 75 level IV ecoregions
ID: 10 level III ecoregions and 71 level IV ecoregions
OR: 9 level III ecoregions and 65 level IV ecoregions
TX: 12 level III ecoregions and 56 level IV ecoregions
NM: 8 level III ecoregions and 55 level IV ecoregions
OK: 12 level III ecoregions and 46 level IV ecoregions
WY: 7 level III ecoregions and 39 level IV ecoregions
CO: 6 level III ecoregions and 35 level IV ecoregions
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Old 12-23-2012, 02:46 AM
 
Location: Phoenix Arizona
2,032 posts, read 4,031,517 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Georgiafrog View Post
Not exactly the same thing, but here is a list of the most biologically diverse states according to the number of species of life.

Total Number of Species

1 California.................6,717
2 Texas.......................6,273
3 Arizona....................4,759
4 New Mexico............4,583
5 Alabama..................4,533
6 Georgia ..................4,436
7 Florida ...................4,368
8 Oregon....................4,136
9 North Carolina........4,131
10 Utah.......................3,892
11 Nevada...................3,872
12 Virginia..................3,803
13 Tennessee..............3,772
14 South Carolina.......3,701
15 Oklahoma..............3,616
16 Colorado................3,597
17 Mississippi.............3,580
18 Louisiana...............3,495
19 Arkansas................3,415
20 Washington...........3,375
21 Missouri.................3,340
22 New York...............3,333
23 Kentucky................3,258
23 Illinois....................3,258
25 Idaho......................3,205
26 Wyoming................3,184
27 Ohio........................3,152
28 Maryland................3,148
29 Michigan................3,135
29 Pennsylvania..........3,135
31 Indiana...................3,098
32 New Jersey.............3,022
33 Montana ................2,921
34 West Virginia.........2,873
35 Wisconsin...............2,869
36 Minnesota...............2,817
37 Kansas.....................2,778
38 Massachusetts........2,765
39 Nebraska.................2,587
40 Iowa........................2,533
41 Connecticut.............2,497
42 South Dakota..........2,406
43 Maine......................2,352
44 New Hampshire......2,327
45 Vermont..................2,274
46 Delaware.................2,244
47 Rhode Island...........2,078
48 North Dakota..........1,889
49 Alaska......................1,835
50 Hawaii.....................1,418

Source: Biodiversity in the United States (Map) | Ecopolitology
That's interesting, and really surprising, especially Alaska and Hawaii coming in last.
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Old 12-23-2012, 02:49 AM
 
Location: Phoenix Arizona
2,032 posts, read 4,031,517 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KayneMo View Post
"Mile for mile, Oklahoma offers the nation’s most diverse terrain. It’s one of only four states with more than 10 ecoregions, and has by far, the most per mile in America according to the EPA. Oklahoma’s ecoregions – or, terrains/subclimates – include everything from Rocky Mountain foothills to cypress swamps, tallgrass prairies, and hardwood forests to pine-covered mountains. Each is graced with wide blue lakes, rivers and streams."



Oklahoma Office of the Secretary of Environment: Land
The more pictures I see of the countryside in Oklahoma, the more I realize what a pretty place it is. I wonder what "Tablelands" is exactly in OK, and what is "Crosstimbers"?
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Old 12-23-2012, 03:28 AM
 
Location: Phoenix Arizona
2,032 posts, read 4,031,517 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EnricoV View Post
Well, if we're going to talk ecoregions ... in descending order, the top ten (one caveat being I could find no data on Arizona):

CA: 13 level III ecoregions and 180 level IV ecoregions
MT: 10 level III ecoregions and 85 level IV ecoregions
WA: 10 level III ecoregions and 75 level IV ecoregions
ID: 10 level III ecoregions and 71 level IV ecoregions
OR: 9 level III ecoregions and 65 level IV ecoregions
TX: 12 level III ecoregions and 56 level IV ecoregions
NM: 8 level III ecoregions and 55 level IV ecoregions
OK: 12 level III ecoregions and 46 level IV ecoregions
WY: 7 level III ecoregions and 39 level IV ecoregions
CO: 6 level III ecoregions and 35 level IV ecoregions
AZ 7 level III ecoregions, couldn't get a count of level IV's (from the EPA)
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Old 12-23-2012, 04:47 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma City
742 posts, read 719,409 times
Reputation: 795
Quote:
Originally Posted by cacto View Post
The more pictures I see of the countryside in Oklahoma, the more I realize what a pretty place it is. I wonder what "Tablelands" is exactly in OK, and what is "Crosstimbers"?
Tablelands are "made up of dissected plains, hills, canyons, escarpments, plains, breaks, buttes, mesas, and terraces. It is more rugged than neighboring ecoregions. Rangeland and grassland occur but, unlike adjacent ecoregions, there is little cropland."

The Crosstimbers is a transition between the plains and forests; it's a mixture of prairie, savannah, and woodland.
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Old 12-23-2012, 04:53 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma City
742 posts, read 719,409 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by okie1962 View Post
Hey please don't confuse these folks with the facts. They all think the North East is diverse because its mostly covered in trees. Plus they already know Oklahoma is nothing but dusty flat plain, because that what they have seen in the movies. Hollywood is famous for it's accuracy.
Hahaha. I always thought it was weird when people thought of Oklahoma as a dusty, flat plain because I grew up in southeastern Oklahoma near the Ouachitas, that's the only Oklahoma I always knew growing up.

Here's a nice pic of the Ouachita Mountains in Oklahoma:
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Old 12-23-2012, 05:21 AM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,794,667 times
Reputation: 4853
Quote:
Originally Posted by dalparadise View Post
Texas is indeed diverse, but its diversity is spread out across hundreds of miles. You can drive for five hours and only change elevation about 200' in the parts where most people live, the vast majority of that being pretty monotonous prairie and coastal plains.

People who try to use charts and numbers to rank Texas anywhere near California in this respect must have never been to Northern California. Surely, you have never seen 350 foot redwoods, then driven 30 minutes into the middle of a dense world city. Or, 15 minutes in the other direction and be on a rocky shoreline with 10 ft waves crashing against cliff sides. Or, 30 minutes another direction into grassy foothills, mountains and dramatic temperature and rainfall differences (just perfect for grape production) of the corresponding valleys. Or, continued on another three hours and been in rugged, alpine mountain territory, where snow capped peaks can last year-round and deep mountain lakes are crystal clear (naturally occurring lakes, mind you (Texas only has one murky natural lake and it's located all the way over on the Eastern side). Or, turn south into the Central Valley where hundreds of miles of the most fertile farm land in the country wedge between the country's most breathtaking national park, and a green, forested coastal mountain range. Or, continued on into the middle of a barren desert, with blowing sand dunes and salt flats.

All of these dramatically different landscapes are contained in an area equal to the driving time between Beaumont and Waco, an area that offers little more than the endless prairie, brown rivers and coastline and pine forests. Like I said, I agree that Texas is diverse, but it's just not in California's league. This state is amazing and its diversity is near where the people actually live.

Some of you guys need to stop searching Wikipedia for charts for your opinions and travel a bit.
The OP never said anything about going from snow-capped mountains to farm land in a matter of 30 minutes being a requirement. He asked for the over all most diverse states. I've already stated that California is the clear winner, but Texas is still a worthy opponent, whether it personally impresses you or not.

The idea that a state loses points for not being absolutely covered in mountainous or hilly terrain is absurd.
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Old 12-23-2012, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,153,902 times
Reputation: 7598
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnricoV View Post
Beginning a post with "Well duh sherlock" is being rude in the extreme.

Can you not see that? Or else, why did you bother putting it there ...
If you are offended by sarcasm as simple as well duh sherlock then you have plenty of growing up to do. Move on dude and stop derailing the thread with personal complaints. This is a discussion forum. If you cant handle critism, get therapy or dont read it
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Old 12-23-2012, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Tulsa, OK
2,572 posts, read 3,521,638 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KayneMo View Post
Hahaha. I always thought it was weird when people thought of Oklahoma as a dusty, flat plain because I grew up in southeastern Oklahoma near the Ouachitas, that's the only Oklahoma I always knew growing up.

Here's a nice pic of the Ouachita Mountains in Oklahoma:
Wow, thats a great picture of Southeastern Oklahoma! I been working up in the Marcellus Shale are of PA, NY and WV and when folks up ask me where I'm from, and I tell them I'm from Oklahoma, they say things like, well you must really enjoy working up here compared to Oklahoma. You must feel like your in paradise, or this must be a total shock for you. When I tell them this area looks a lot like the part of Oklahoma I'm from, they think I'm lying! LOL

I guess the dust bowl was so bad in the 5 or 6 of our 77 counties, and it got so much national attention, that the rest of the country thinks it was the whole state was a dust bowl.
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