U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-23-2012, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Tulsa, OK
2,572 posts, read 3,526,487 times
Reputation: 2387

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
The OP never said anything about going from snow-capped mountains to farm land in a matter of 30 minutes being a requirement. He asked for the over all most diverse states. I've already stated that California is the clear winner, but Texas is still a worthy opponent, whether it personally impresses you or not.

The idea that a state loses points for not being absolutely covered in mountainous or hilly terrain is absurd.
I'm with you Nairobi, the OP ask which states were the most diverse.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-23-2012, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,180,477 times
Reputation: 7598
Quote:
Originally Posted by okie1962 View Post
I'm with you Nairobi, the OP ask which states were the most diverse.
I agree with the two of you.
The question is simply which has tge most diverse geography. Its funny how they have to come up with side issues to make states look bad.

Looking at the maps it looks like that enture area from oklahoma going down into texas has diverse scapes. Having them was what the op asked, not distance
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-23-2012, 09:07 AM
 
5,265 posts, read 14,909,004 times
Reputation: 4239
Quote:
Originally Posted by okie1962 View Post
Hey please don't confuse these folks with the facts. They all think the North East is diverse because its mostly covered in trees. Plus they already know Oklahoma is nothing but dusty flat plain, because that what they have seen in the movies. Hollywood is famous for it's accuracy.
The north east is fairly diverse because it has access to both the great lakes and the Atlantic, has mountains and beaches, numerous features left over from the ice age and especially in PA and Central Upstate NY, some Karst topography. Nobody is arguing it is the most diverse and I wouldn't even necessarily say it is more diverse than Oklahoma...but it certainly isn't "all the same" as you say in an earlier post
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-23-2012, 09:51 AM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,811,476 times
Reputation: 4853
Someone brought up the least diverse state, and (though I'm not certain) I think it would probably be Mississippi; not ugly, but not exactly varied, from what I can remember.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-23-2012, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Tulsa, OK
2,572 posts, read 3,526,487 times
Reputation: 2387
Quote:
Originally Posted by I'minformed2 View Post
The north east is fairly diverse because it has access to both the great lakes and the Atlantic, has mountains and beaches, numerous features left over from the ice age and especially in PA and Central Upstate NY, some Karst topography. Nobody is arguing it is the most diverse and I wouldn't even necessarily say it is more diverse than Oklahoma...but it certainly isn't "all the same" as you say in an earlier post
I'm sorry but I'm going to have to disagree about PA being very diverse. I do pipeline work and right now most of the action is in PA. I lived a year in Greene County and then on to Wyalusing, PA. Have done work in Greensburg, Williamsport and many areas of PA between. Most of these jobs are about 30 to 50 mile long projects, and we walk that entire project. It may take 4 or 5 months to walk it but we walk every step of the way. And other than the hills getting taller and bigger from one area to another there was not much difference between Greene County and Wayalusing, PA. When you get to Allentown it starts getting flatter but still small hills and trees.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-23-2012, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Baghdad by the Bay (San Francisco, California)
3,530 posts, read 4,267,205 times
Reputation: 3145
Quote:
Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
I agree with the two of you.
The question is simply which has tge most diverse geography. Its funny how they have to come up with side issues to make states look bad.

Looking at the maps it looks like that enture area from oklahoma going down into texas has diverse scapes. Having them was what the op asked, not distance
I understand, but how much diversity do you see? The nature of diversity in any category is how closely divergent people or things exist to one another. The fact that Texas encompasses a randomly drawn area of mostly no man's land about 350 miles wide that is sparsely populated and rarely if ever seen by 95% of the people who live in the mostly homogeneous Eastern half of the state is a sign of lack of diversity in the true sense of the term.

I am well aware of the beauty of Texas. I have traveled all across it. Its diverse landscape is not cohesive as a single state, culturally, however. I actually think that is to its advantage, as that's part of its appeal--the "Texas is its own country" way of thinking. However, I interpreted the spirit of the OP's question to elicit an opinion based on experience. Anyone can count eco regions, whatever that means, and a state whose land area spans nearly 1/3 of the country not leading in this metric actually supports its large degree of homogeneity. People in Dallas and Houston (about 1/3 of the total state's population, alone) touting the diversity of their landscape is the height of ridiculous. Austin and San Antonio can make slightly more substantive claims to diversity.

You will enjoy this analogy to help you understand what I mean. It will give you some ammo against SF. I live in San Francisco, which is located in one of the most racially and culturally diverse urban areas in the country. But, where I live and where millions visit every year is predominantly white and Asian throughout the entire city. So, most people think there are very few black or Latino people in the Bay Area, for this reason. Now, I can look across to Oakland or down to San Jose, or expand to Vallejo and Stockton and all of a sudden, I am thumping my chest about San Francisco's diversity. The stats tell me, that as a resident of the Bay Area, I live in a very racially diverse area. Reality is that I live in an area with mostly white and Asian people that seems much less diverse, no matter how the lines are drawn.

Last edited by dalparadise; 12-23-2012 at 12:41 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-23-2012, 12:44 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,811,476 times
Reputation: 4853
Quote:
Originally Posted by dalparadise View Post
I understand, but how much diversity do you see? The nature of diversity in any category is how closely divergent people or things exist to one another. The fact that Texas encompasses a a randomly drawn area of mostly no man's land about 350 miles wide that is sparsely populated and rarely if ever seen by 95% of the people who live in the mostly homogeneous Eastern half of the state is a sign of lack of diversity in the true sense of the term.

I am well aware of the beauty of Texas. I have traveled all across it. Its diverse landscape is not cohesive as a single state, culturally, however. I actually think that is to its advantage, as that's part of its appeal--the "Texas is its own country" way of thinking. However, I interpreted the spirit of the OP's question to elicit an opinion based on experience. Anyone can count eco regions, whatever that means, and a state whose land area spans nearly 1/3 of the country not leading in diversity actually supports its large degree of homogeneity. People in Dallas and Houston (about 1/3 of the total state's population, alone) touting the diversity of their landscape is the height of ridiculous. Austin and San Antonio can make slightly more substantive claims to diversity.

You will enjoy this analogy to help you understand what I mean. It will give you some ammo against SF. I live in San Francisco, which is located in one of the most racially and culturally diverse urban areas in the country. But, where I live and where millions visit every year is predominantly white and Asian throughout the entire city. So, most people think there are very few black or Latino people in the Bay Area, for this reason. Now, I can look across to Oakland or down to San Jose, or expand to Vallejo and Stockton and all of a sudden, I am thumping my chest about San Francisco's diversity. The stats tell me, that as a resident of the Bay Area, I live in a very racially diverse area. Reality is that I live in an area with mostly white and Asian people that seems much less diverse, no matter how the lines are drawn.
Suddenly, it's not enough that within Greater Houston alone, we have dense pine and hardwood forests, marshes, oak prairies, and sandy beaches in the vicinity. No, we need to have some mountains, deserts, and rolling green hills for us to be "truly" diverse.

The way I see it, you're splitting way too many hairs, here. I respect your POV, as long as you understand that your answer isn't necessarily the right one.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-23-2012, 12:46 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,811,476 times
Reputation: 4853
...and I guess we're going to continue overlooking the fact that, like Texas, California is huge.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-23-2012, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Baghdad by the Bay (San Francisco, California)
3,530 posts, read 4,267,205 times
Reputation: 3145
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
...and I guess we're going to continue overlooking the fact that, like Texas, California is huge.
No, I'm with you on that and there are stretches of central CA that are as flat as Texas, but turn left or right from any point and drive 30 minutes and you will be in an entirely different environment. That's diversity, in my opinion, and I understand that it may not be yours.

Regarding the forest conversation, I love Houston's trees. I especially love the areas south of the piney woods, where there are more hardwoods. The pines, where I grew up, are less impressive to me and by the time you get to Centerville, even they are gone.

We referred to growing up in Nacogdoches as being "behind the Pine Curtain".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-23-2012, 12:57 PM
 
56,674 posts, read 80,995,527 times
Reputation: 12530
Quote:
Originally Posted by okie1962 View Post
The forests area of East Texas, is as big as some of the states mentioned on your list.

Also how is PA, NY and MD considered that diverse. I have been working up in that area for the last 5 years and PA looks the same pretty much all over. Where are the plains, canyons, deserts, you cold be set down in any area in those three states and it would be difficult identify what state you are in.
PA and NY have canyons and flatlands, with NY having sand dunes on Lake Ontario. If you leave the Twin Tiers, you would see how diverse those states are.

Here is some information on NY: New York State Geology

New York geologic map data
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top