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Old 12-22-2012, 10:20 AM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,513 posts, read 9,049,534 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
What does "pop" even mean? Seriously, where did that word even come from?
Ever hear of "Soda Pop"? It's the soft drink for all our cold beverages. While I can't tell you exactly what happened I think different areas of the country called it different things. For some reason the midwest broke it down to pop, and that's what all soft drink beverages are referred to now. Whereas the rest of the country calls it soda, and the deep south...being ever backwards, calls it all coke!

Being out of the midwest for over 3 years now, I've gone to calling it soda. Seems more fitting.
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Old 12-22-2012, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Floribama
14,969 posts, read 31,357,878 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
Ever hear of "Soda Pop"? It's the soft drink for all our cold beverages. While I can't tell you exactly what happened I think different areas of the country called it different things. For some reason the midwest broke it down to pop, and that's what all soft drink beverages are referred to now. Whereas the rest of the country calls it soda, and the deep south...being ever backwards, calls it all coke!

Being out of the midwest for over 3 years now, I've gone to calling it soda. Seems more fitting.
Yeah, I've heard of "soda pop", but where did the "pop" part come from? Is it because it makes popping sounds as it fizzes? Or maybe because you "pop the top" of a can?

And as a Southerner, if I want a Sprite, I'll say I want a Sprite, and so forth. When it comes to cola, the majority of Southerners prefer Coca-Cola, and that's why people automatically say "Coke". It's a majority rules kinda thing. I may call a generic cola a "Coke", but not a lemon lime soda. I usually just ask someone if they want a drink, and then tell them what types I have.
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Old 12-22-2012, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,513 posts, read 9,049,534 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
Yeah, I've heard of "soda pop", but where did the "pop" part come from? Is it because it makes popping sounds as it fizzes? Or maybe because you "pop the top" of a can?

And as a Southerner, if I want a Sprite, I'll say I want a Sprite, and so forth. When it comes to cola, the majority of Southerners prefer Coca-Cola, and that's why people automatically say "Coke". It's a majority rules kinda thing. I may call a generic cola a "Coke", but not a lemon lime soda. I usually just ask someone if they want a drink, and then tell them what types I have.
Makes sense. Coca-Cola is headquartered in Atlanta and Pepsi in New York City.
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Old 12-22-2012, 04:45 PM
 
1,070 posts, read 1,378,086 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ja1myn View Post
This is mostly a rant/vent unfortunately but hopefully it will spark some sort of intelligent conversation.

So I moved to Atlanta from NY. I grew up in CT and NY (upstate and downstate) and all of my family is from NY, CT, or RI. I didn't realize until I moved down here that my accent is mashed up and annoying as hell.

I do the typical NYC words like coffee, dog, and talk like cawfee, dawg, and tawk. That's how my family members from Brooklyn and Staten Island say it so I guess I just naturally picked it up.

But my mother's family is from RI. They also say those words the same but they do the "r" thing that I think Boston people do as well. Car become cah and door become doowah (not sure exactly how to type it phonetically). Under becomes unduh and garbage becomes gahbage.

My family from NYC doesn't do the "r" thing though. So when I talk to people, they don't get how I lived in New York but have the "r" problem.

I considered taking courses to lose the accent or at least weaken it a bit but my friend convinced me not to because he said it makes me unique to people in the South, which is a valid point. The ladies seem to love it down here.

It just sucks having a mixed accent sort of I guess you could say.

What sucks even more is that I'm half Asian and you never hear an Asian with this accent. The only people who are Asian in my family that I know are my dad and my grandmother. My mom comes from a gigantic family with the majority of them being Italian. The more I researched this whole accent thing, the more I understand that it's kinda an Italian thing.

Just blows.
I was reared in New York, but my accent is Spanish. I do not hate it because it is my culture, but it certainly puts me at as disadvantage, when I speak to racist people. Aside from that, I have no problem with it....
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Old 12-22-2012, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Atlanta & NYC
6,620 posts, read 11,666,509 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Latina7 View Post
I was reared in New York, but my accent is Spanish. I do not hate it because it is my culture, but it certainly puts me at as disadvantage, when I speak to racist people. Aside from that, I have no problem with it....
Racist people are never as hot as a Latina.
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Old 12-22-2012, 08:35 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,361,353 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ja1myn View Post
It's just annoying to me because I get asked by both people not from the northeast and from the northeast about why I talk like an old school Italian NYer/Bostonian yet I am Asian looking.

Yeah Atlanta is the same way. Native ATL people talk way too slow and take decades to get a sentence out.

The moment I begin to pick up the Southern accent, I am moving back north. No offense to anyone with a heavy Southern accent, it just isn't music to my ears.



It's funny you brought up the "fixin'" thing. A guy who I work with is from NC and he always says he's "fixin' to do this or that" and I'm like "wtf are you tawkin' about?"
You should check out this guy:


New York English 01 - YouTube

I think it's awesome when Asians have a regional accent lol.
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Old 12-23-2012, 09:46 PM
 
1,027 posts, read 1,648,427 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
I don't hear many people come forward and say that their accent is annoying. Been living in Mississippi for over 2 years now and I think 75% of the people here talk too slow and with so thick of an accent I can't understand them some of the time. It goes both ways though, being from the midwest they say they sometimes have a hard time understanding me...which doesn't make sense because nearly everyone on cable TV and movies has the standard American accent that I do.

Seems like the more annoying accents are the east coast/Bostonian accents and the deep south/hick accents. The rest of them are pretty pleasant I think, but it's all personal preference.

I know of several transplants in Mississippi who came from Florida, California, etc and have now picked up the southern accent after living here for a few years.

I'm not sure how the accents are in Atlanta, it's a big city, and big cities even in the south don't have the same thickness as the small towns do.
You got any youtube links on what you mean.

What thick accent?

These people don't have much of thick accent


How they talk in KY, OH and TX (from AMERICAN TONGUES) - YouTube
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Old 12-23-2012, 10:55 PM
 
Location: NYC
94 posts, read 191,403 times
Reputation: 78
Have any of you ever seen the documentary "Do You Speak American?" We watched it in a high school English class, and it was really fascinating. Basically about going around the US and examining not just accents but the wording and phrases and slang of every region and how they all differ.

Since moving to NYC, I've noticed a lot of my southern-isms. For instance, when I go to a restaurant I ask, "What kind of coke do you have?" Also, anytime I ask if a place has Dr. Pepper, they laugh and say, "You're form the south, huh?" So I guess DP is a southern thing? That surprised me.

I love explaining southernisms to my friends in NYC. My favorite has been, "Y'all quit being ugly!" My roommate heard a southern woman say this to her children and was HORRIFIED. She took it literally, as in she was calling her child "ugly." I had to explain that, in the south, "Quit being ugly," is a phrase you say to kids when they are being rude or misbehaving. I LOVE this phrase, because it equates "ugly" to rude, mean, or disrespectful. That is "ugly,' not how you look. My friends were fascinated by this. And I was fascinated they didn't hear that phrase a million times as a kid like i did! lol
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Old 12-23-2012, 11:46 PM
 
1,027 posts, read 1,648,427 times
Reputation: 280
Here is Kentucky accent.

Go to 523 in the video


Trip to eastern kentucky - YouTube

Note the Kentucky accent is not that strong.
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Old 12-24-2012, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,708 posts, read 36,132,256 times
Reputation: 63305
I was born in New Orleans, and have lived in Louisiana, California, Tennessee, Japan, Ohio, Virginia, North Carolina, Alabama, Georgia, Maryland, Texas, Germany, South Carolina, and Arkansas. I have lived in Texas for the past twenty years.

I was a corporate trainer who traveled all over the US for several years, training large groups of people. People often remarked about my southern accent - usually positive remarks but occasionally they would poke fun at me. No matter. I love being from the American South and I love my southern accent, even though it is a mixed bag of southern accents. I'd say it is predominately Texan but without quite as much twang because of my years spent living in the deep south where there's not as much twang and a lot more drawl!

Now - I'm fidna eat sum grits. Y'all won't sum?
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