U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-15-2013, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Baghdad by the Bay (San Francisco, California)
3,530 posts, read 4,263,451 times
Reputation: 3145

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Questions like this are heavily favoured towards U.S. posters since most, judging from the comments, don't consider Canada or Mexico etc when asked about North America. Dismissing the CN tower, as some have done, or Vancouver's landmarks, because the majority in the U.S. don't a clue about these places proves that.
This sounds a little like the Houston argument. Part of being a major landmark is something's ability to transcend the kind of regionality or bias you are talking about. Take St. Basil's in Moscow, for instance. I doubt more than .01% of posters here have seen it in person. Few have any reason to consider this structure as top-of-mind. Most probably can't name it. But, as soon as its image comes up, many people around the world will say, "that's Moscow".

Same thing with Parliament in London, the Eiffel Tower, Sydney Opera House, ...

The CN Tower doesn't have that kind of cache. Nor does the overlooked landmark in Vancouver you left unnamed for some reason.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-15-2013, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,672 posts, read 8,743,773 times
Reputation: 7283
Quote:
Originally Posted by dalparadise View Post
This sounds a little like the Houston argument. Part of being a major landmark is something's ability to transcend the kind of regionality or bias you are talking about. Take St. Basil's in Moscow, for instance. I doubt more than .01% of posters here have seen it in person. Few have any reason to consider this structure as top-of-mind. Most probably can't name it. But, as soon as its image comes up, many people around the world will say, "that's Moscow".

Same thing with Parliament in London, the Eiffel Tower, Sydney Opera House, ...

The CN Tower doesn't have that kind of cache. Nor does the overlooked landmark in Vancouver you left unnamed for some reason.
Well that is kind of my point. The majority of posters here are in the U.S. and like it or not, many in the U.S. have a total blind spot to Canada. So when what was the tallest free standing structure in the world for many years, the CN Tower, doesn't have any cache to the majority of U.S. posters it sort of shows that Canadian landmarks are at a disadvantage. I mean what does it take if not the tallest structure etc.?
So answering the original question is sort of impossible to include Canada since any city in Canada smaller than Toronto is going to be smaller than the top 5 biggest cities in the U.S. I just don't think Canada should of been included since it loses by default.
The overlooked landmark in Vancouver by the way is Science World ( a leftover from the 1986 World's Fair ) and any shot of downtown against the coastal mountains. Both iconic in Canada to represent Vancouver.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-15-2013, 02:40 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,816 posts, read 12,321,925 times
Reputation: 4767
I don't assocaite Niagara Falls with Buffalo so I guess there's that argument. Buffalo itself does not have a single landmark. I do agree it is a major city but I have no idea what its skyline looks like. Its the same for me with San Jose, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Indianapolis (except for the speedway), Kansas City, Oklahoma City, and Norfolk. Richmond has the White House of the Confederacy but those not into Civil War history probably will not recognize it. I also don't think Charlotte or Raleigh have a lot of famous landmarks though I can pick out those skylines since i've been there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-15-2013, 02:42 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,816 posts, read 12,321,925 times
Reputation: 4767
I can easily recognize the CN Tower, but nothing in other Canadian cities like Montreal, Vancouver, Calgary or Edmonton. I think Canadian cities are relatively bland and nondescript that is why so many movies use Canada as a stand-in for the United States like they can be any random city anywhere.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-15-2013, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Phoenix Arizona
2,032 posts, read 4,033,050 times
Reputation: 2693
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Well that is kind of my point. The majority of posters here are in the U.S. and like it or not, many in the U.S. have a total blind spot to Canada. So when what was the tallest free standing structure in the world for many years, the CN Tower, doesn't have any cache to the majority of U.S. posters it sort of shows that Canadian landmarks are at a disadvantage. I mean what does it take if not the tallest structure etc.?
So answering the original question is sort of impossible to include Canada since any city in Canada smaller than Toronto is going to be smaller than the top 5 biggest cities in the U.S. I just don't think Canada should of been included since it loses by default.
The overlooked landmark in Vancouver by the way is Science World ( a leftover from the 1986 World's Fair ) and any shot of downtown against the coastal mountains. Both iconic in Canada to represent Vancouver.
Why the hell does Cartoon Network have it's own "tower" in Canada?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-15-2013, 05:02 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,672 posts, read 8,743,773 times
Reputation: 7283
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
I can easily recognize the CN Tower, but nothing in other Canadian cities like Montreal, Vancouver, Calgary or Edmonton. I think Canadian cities are relatively bland and nondescript that is why so many movies use Canada as a stand-in for the United States like they can be any random city anywhere.
Those are fighting words! LOL. Bland. Hmmmm. Have you been to Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver? Montreal has amazing energy and culture with a beautiful old town, fantastic neighbourhoods such as the Latin Quarter, Gay Village, The Plateau etc. All vibrant and certainly not bland. One photo doesn't tell the whole story...but I don't find this bland.

Colorful Row Houses, Montreal Canada | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

Toronto, although fellow Canadians love to kid the city about being too focused on work and not play like Montreal and Vancouver, it too is far from bland. Many incredibly active neighbourhoods and festivals which including North America's largest Pride festival...yes bigger than NYC. It is rated as the most diverse city on the planet as well...so if that creates blandness so be it.

Toronto night view | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

Now my hometown Vancouver is not Toronto or Montreal but again bland?

Vancouver from above 3

All three cities are quite different from each other. The reason they get used in movies and TV shows as substitutes for U.S. cities is A) when the CDN dollar was lower than the U.S. it attracted U.S. productions
B) crews in Canada are high quality and no language barrier
C) many buildings are similar and can be in either country and the same with
cars.
Filming crews do make mistakes though. How many times have people in Seattle scratched their heads when a supposed shot of Seattle has mountains next to downtown, which don't exist in Seattle.


Unfortunately most of the world gets it's images of places by movies and T.V. Canadian movies and T.V. don't have a big international audience.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2014, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Baltimore
683 posts, read 732,591 times
Reputation: 548
Quote:
Originally Posted by nave209 View Post
Baltimore has no notable big landmarks
There are a lot of landmarks that are popular and unpopular but still significant in Baltimore and to the U.S. Some are visible in the skyline while others are hidden:

1.Washington Monument (Baltimore)- the first and oldest monument to the first U.S. president. It is 178 feet tall. Completed in 1829.
2. Fort McHenry which is where Francis Scott Key wrote the national anthem title "Battle of Baltimore" after he witnessed the bombardment of the fort while held captive on a British ship in the Baltimore Harbor.
3. Phoenix Shot Tower
4. B&O Railroad headquarters building and museum. Also, the B&O Warehouse Building is the longest brick building on the east coast completed in the late 19th century.
5. Oriole Park at Camden Yards- which really ignited the retro ballpark style for MLB. Considered one of the most beautiful parks in the league.
5. Inner Harbor of course.- today it is a major tourist attraction but what many people don't know is that is was also the 2nd leading entry for immigrants to america behind Ellis Island/New York Harbor.
6. City Hall- facade of building features same marble used in the Washington monument and the capital building columns in Washington DC. As well as the marble steps featured in the Baltimore British style row homes.
7. Druid Hill Park which is the 3 rd oldest municipal park in the country behind Central Park in New York City.
8. Fort Carroll- Although the fort was never in any battles it still has an interesting history. Located very close to the Francis Scott Key Bridge. Designed right in the middle of Baltimore outer harbor by Robert E. Lee and the army corps of engineers in the 19 th century it is pretty much abandoned as it was never fully completed. There have been many uses for the fort. In 1911 the city mayor at the time wanted to build a statue similar to the size of the statue of liberty of the state of Maryland's first proprietor. The base would become Fort Carroll like the Fort Ward Base of the Statue of Liberty. Unfortunately it did not happen.
9. Fort McHenry Tunnel- one of the widest if not widest underwater tunnel in america as well as the most expensive. Recently surpassed by the Big Dig in Boston. It goes more than 100 feet under the Baltimore harbor. When it was completed it served and continues to serve as a vital link within the east coast most significant expressway I-95
10. Baltimore Harbor Tunnel. Also has a depth of more than 100 feet under water.
11. George Peabody Library- a world class library, considered one of the most beautiful libraries in the nation and world. So beautiful they even allow people to have there weddings/receptions there.
12. Johns Hopkins Hospital and University- world renowed one of the best hospitals and universities in the nation.
13. Under Armour headquarters
14. Federal Hill Park
15. Francis Scott Key Bridge (Baltimore)
16. World Trade Center (Baltimore)- world's tallest equilateral pentagonal building designed by I.M. Pei. Same designer of the Twin Towers.
17. Lexington Market.
18. Baltimore Ravens-only team in NFL to be based on a literary work by Edgar Allan Poe.
19. Bromo Seltzer Tower
20. The Baltimore Basilica- the first catholic cathedral in the nation. Legendary visitor include mother Teresa and the pope of the Vatican in Rome. Designed by Benjamin Latrobe same man that helped Thomas Jefferson design the US Capital Building.
21. Maryland Sate Flag- only state flag to be based on English heraldry.
22. Baltimore City Flag- has the (Battle Monument) seal to commemorate the Baltimore citizens that defended Baltimore at Fort McHenry.
23. National flag that features 15 stars and stripes that flew over fort mchenry during the war of 1812 now at the Smithsonian museum in Washington DC. This is the flag that inspired key to write the star spangeled banner. Marry Pickersgill the lady who sewed the flag with a group of helpers house still stand as a landmark today. Now know as the Flag House and Star Spangled Banner Museum.
24. Penn Station
25. Bethlehem Steel- During its operation when Baltimore was a major industrial city. The steel mill at Sparrows Point would become the world's largest. The plant manufactured steel for the famous Golden Gate Bridge, Empire State Building, and many World War ll ships still in use today. I believed one ship that was manufactured in Baltimore survived the bombings at Pearl Harbor.
26. The National Aquarium in Baltimore
27. Walter Art Museum- world class museum in the cultural district of Baltimore's mount Vernon neighborhood.
28. Power Plant Building
29. Hippodrome Theator
30. Vietnam Veterans Memorial Bridge (Hanover Street Bridge)- a drawbridge that crosses the middle branch of the patapsco river.

Most of these landmarks are on the national register of historic sites as well as the neighborhoods they're located in.

Fun fact: Baltimore has a landmark river/stream that run right through it and empties into the inner harbor called the Jones Falls. It was covered in the 1960s by an expressway called the jfx (Jones falls expressway).

Last edited by Northernest Southernest C; 02-15-2014 at 05:00 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2014, 04:06 PM
 
349 posts, read 457,124 times
Reputation: 255
Quote:
Originally Posted by jm02 View Post
There have been a number of surprisingly laughable posts assuming the OP means which cities do not have nationally identifiable landmarks. Sports stadiums, brown mountains, shopping malls, local known skyscrapers and sculptures and such are not likely recognized by the average American. My list of landmarks where I feel a random person on the street has a good likelihood of placing them is very limited and includes only the following:

Statue of Liberty - NYC
US Capitol, White House, Washington Monument - Washington DC
Gateway Arch - St Louis
Hollywood sign - LA
GG Bridge - SF
Diamondhead with city skyline - Honolulu
You had me til you mentioned Honolulu which pretty much looks like every coastal resort city in the world. I've never heard of Diamondhead til now also.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2014, 04:21 PM
 
Location: The Land of Reason
13,300 posts, read 10,492,269 times
Reputation: 3541
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
I'd say Centennial Park and Turner Field are considered landmarks especially the former, plus Stone Mountain which is part of the Atlanta region. I'd probably go with:

San Diego----Ocean view?
San Jose--- lost me
Pittsburgh ---see below
Phoenix--- That crazy governor chick
Albuquerque--- I dunno
Kansas City-- beats the hell out of me
Denver --- Mountain veiw
Milwaukee---Brewery
Norfolk -- Naval Shipyard?
Minneapolis
---Prince


Ah Pittsburgh has the Three Rivers which is the start of the mighty Ohio river
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2014, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Baltimore
683 posts, read 732,591 times
Reputation: 548
Quote:
Originally Posted by simetime View Post
---Prince


Ah Pittsburgh has the Three Rivers which is the start of the mighty Ohio river
And there's PNC Park
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top