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Old 01-07-2013, 12:45 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,767,219 times
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All i know is that Charleston, SC and Savannah, GA are two of the best small cities in the country.
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Old 01-07-2013, 01:00 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,841,063 times
Reputation: 4853
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
I didn't say it was wonderful. I said it was different. Now it is not.

By the way, there were 72 church burnings, presumably race-related, in the 1990s in South Carolina alone. That's one every two months in just one state. Which the US news media barely mentioned, and many were not properly investigated.

http://photos.msstate.edu/releases/p...ingsb.jpg?8926

https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publicatio...aspx?id=238438
Understandable, but I have to agree with Kathryn in saying that the South we have today is one still full of charm and distinct character with its worst days behind it.

I live in one of the most transplant-filled and outsider-influenced cities in this region, but I still feel that southern spirit and culture when I'm in certain parts of town. I simply disagree that we've become just like every other region.
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Old 01-07-2013, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
45,260 posts, read 36,447,144 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
Understandable, but I have to agree with Kathryn in saying that the South we have today is one still full of charm and distinct character with its worst days behind it.

I live in one of the most transplant-filled and outsider-influenced cities in this region, but I still feel that southern spirit and culture when I'm in certain parts of town. I simply disagree that we've become just like every other region.
Totally agree.

The South isn't perfect but no region is. So we pick the things that are most important to us when we decide where to live and where to visit.

If you love beautiful scenery, great regional cuisines, mild winters and warm springs and falls (and can bear the heat of summer, which to me is only really uncomfortable consistently in from mid July to mid September - but then there's always A/C and water sports!), friendly people, interesting historical places, a low cost of living generally speaking, and a rich cultural heritage with lots of diversity, then the American south may be a place to explore and possibly live.

I've lived from the Chesapeake Bay to central Texas, and from north Arkansas down to deep Georgia, and I love this region. Do I love urban sprawl? No. Huge metroplexes? Not to settle in, but I like having their amenities close at hand. Do I like small minds in small towns? Not particularly, but they're easy to avoid. And guess what - every other region of this country has the SAME issues of urban sprawl, congested metroplexes, and closed minded small towns, as well as pockets of poverty, crime, etc.

I don't believe that today's south has any worse atmosphere of prejudice than any other region in the US overall. There's room for improvement in that issue EVERYWHERE but the trend is positive.
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Old 01-08-2013, 01:56 AM
 
1,892 posts, read 2,505,955 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FSUMike View Post
Why do you say that? I've never been to Australia, but I've met and conversed with a good number of Aussies in my day. I would think that California would be most like Australia, culturally speaking, considering that the vast majority of Australians live in huge cities (Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide, Brisbane, Perth, etc) and are very near the coast.

Maybe the Aussies who grew up in the outback would feel more at home in the rural South, but they are few and far between. I would think that your average Australian, being most likely from a city of 1 million or more, would feel more at home in a big American city.


You seem to be focused on the land. In answer, I wrote what I did because i was writing of the people. Austrailians are a warm laid back people , not at all like the stressed out west coast. They live a much more balanced life than we in the US do on the whole. We are just so driven and worry about everything.

It is news to me that the south is more rural that other regions of the US. I find cities and natural land in all parts of the county. I was just in Detroit but enjoyed the grassy plains as I drove up to Lake Huron.

I think you will find that the cities of Austrailia are not just filled with Austrailians, but with hundreds of thousands of people like me and other Asians as well.

At any rate the south has the cities the natural land with unique features, great beaches , throw in Florida for a little stress and of course we are just a couple of hours from the Carribean Islands. They too are used to hopping off to the islands. They can't do that in California.

At any rate we obviously don't see it the same way, but I hope i was able to explain why I said that I think they would feel more at home here in the south. I do too for many of the same reasons. I suppose it is very American to want to live in congested cities when you can just live on the edge and seek the good life. Of the tweny-five million people there, I assure you that almost half of them do not live in the five cities you listed. It is a changing country.

Best wishes,
raj
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Old 01-08-2013, 02:09 AM
 
1,892 posts, read 2,505,955 times
Reputation: 940
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Totally agree.

The South isn't perfect but no region is. So we pick the things that are most important to us when we decide where to live and where to visit.

If you love beautiful scenery, great regional cuisines, mild winters and warm springs and falls (and can bear the heat of summer, which to me is only really uncomfortable consistently in from mid July to mid September - but then there's always A/C and water sports!), friendly people, interesting historical places, a low cost of living generally speaking, and a rich cultural heritage with lots of diversity, then the American south may be a place to explore and possibly live.

I've lived from the Chesapeake Bay to central Texas, and from north Arkansas down to deep Georgia, and I love this region. Do I love urban sprawl? No. Huge metroplexes? Not to settle in, but I like having their amenities close at hand. Do I like small minds in small towns? Not particularly, but they're easy to avoid. And guess what - every other region of this country has the SAME issues of urban sprawl, congested metroplexes, and closed minded small towns, as well as pockets of poverty, crime, etc.

I don't believe that today's south has any worse atmosphere of prejudice than any other region in the US overall. There's room for improvement in that issue EVERYWHERE but the trend is positive.

If racial differences are part of the cultural comparison, I can say that on a recent trip to Michigan I was shocked at how friendly everyone was and how few people had distinctively different accents from what I am use to here. And I also found it to be the most segregated place I have ever been.

The things I listed above are almost always brought up in a discussion of the south and yet here I was at the Canadian border finding positives and negatives in these same cultural elements.

I find through travel that only very provincial people think that everyone but them is bogged down in the past. We all have our issues and good points and should try not to better ourselves by tearing down others.

I agree with your positive views about the south.

raj
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Old 01-08-2013, 04:39 AM
 
567 posts, read 914,512 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raj kapoor View Post
The south is more like Australia than any other part of the US...........therefore you would probably feel quite comfy mate.

Good wishes,
raj
Australia is godless and arid. It's more like the West, not the South.
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Old 01-08-2013, 06:00 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
3,085 posts, read 5,467,712 times
Reputation: 4345
Quote:
Originally Posted by raj kapoor View Post
If racial differences are part of the cultural comparison, I can say that on a recent trip to Michigan I was shocked at how friendly everyone was and how few people had distinctively different accents from what I am use to here. And I also found it to be the most segregated place I have ever been.

The things I listed above are almost always brought up in a discussion of the south and yet here I was at the Canadian border finding positives and negatives in these same cultural elements.

I find through travel that only very provincial people think that everyone but them is bogged down in the past. We all have our issues and good points and should try not to better ourselves by tearing down others.

I agree with your positive views about the south.

raj
Good post. Interesting thoughts.
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Old 01-08-2013, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,455,078 times
Reputation: 36100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
I simply disagree that we've become just like every other region.
I intended to imply that in the past 50 years, we have come most of the way to homogenization. Yes, you still hear mockingbirds in the south, and a few men calling ladies ma'am, but a lot more has been lost than what's been retained.

If you blindfolded somebody in Opelousas, and took them to Oshkosh, they might not notice the difference unless it was snowing.
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Old 01-08-2013, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
45,260 posts, read 36,447,144 times
Reputation: 64148
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
I intended to imply that in the past 50 years, we have come most of the way to homogenization. Yes, you still hear mockingbirds in the south, and a few men calling ladies ma'am, but a lot more has been lost than what's been retained.

If you blindfolded somebody in Opelousas, and took them to Oshkosh, they might not notice the difference unless it was snowing.
I'd say that person's powers of observation were sorely lacking.
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Old 01-08-2013, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Lafayette, La
2,039 posts, read 4,567,381 times
Reputation: 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Sure - and of course Dallas is right there - but Dallas has less of a southern feel than even Fort Worth, in my opinion. It's urban sprawl at it's worst.

As for Austin and the Alamo, those are great places to visit but they don't feel southern to me at all. He's wanting to visit the American south - I didn't get the idea he meant the south WEST but I could be wrong. But that's why i cut it off at Fort Worth - the gateway to the American West.

Houston is an interesting city with some southern flair to it, and you gave him some great ideas for things to do there, but please note that I also didn't mention Birmingham, or Little Rock, or any number of other interesting southern cities - I was trying to keep on a circular route to and from Virginia.

He could go south from Fort Worth to Houston and go from Houston to New Orleans - that would also be a cool way to go. But I'd leave out Austin, Dallas, and San Antonio if I was trying to get a feel for the American South.
You left out Lafayette, Louisiana too. Its right at the intersection of I49 south from shreveport and I10 east to New Orleans and CANNOT be missed.
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