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Old 01-07-2013, 03:00 AM
 
Location: West Tennessee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
It's starting to develop the Northern Cities Vowel Shift like Chicago.
I agree with this. I've heard younger people from St. Louis use the NCVS.
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Old 01-07-2013, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Shaw.
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I wonder which other accents have noticeable generation gaps. Older White residents of DC will drop their R's (as DC used to be more Southern linguistically).
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Old 01-07-2013, 09:33 AM
 
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st. louis proper and its adjacent suburbs have a very distinct urban dialect with mostly northern and eastern features. this is especially true among natives who grew up in the central city. harry caray, who was born and raised and lived most of his life in st. louis, has the quintessential st. louis city dialect, which is still very prevalent, although diminishing among younger generations:


Harry Caray on stealing wives - YouTube
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Old 01-07-2013, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Colorado
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It's kind of interesting that you can follow US Route 20 for about 1,000 miles from near Albany, New York to near Waterloo, Iowa and remain (mostly) within the Inland North dialect!
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Old 01-08-2013, 03:17 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
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Yeah, it's all about migration patterns that were made possible by the Erie Canal and later the railroads. The weird part is that Erie gets bypassed. I haven't seen a reason for that before, but it makes Erie rather unique among the Great Lakes cities.
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Old 01-08-2013, 05:27 PM
 
Location: New Hampshire
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
Yeah, it's all about migration patterns that were made possible by the Erie Canal and later the railroads. The weird part is that Erie gets bypassed. I haven't seen a reason for that before, but it makes Erie rather unique among the Great Lakes cities.
A UPenn PhD student wrote his dissertation on the Erie dialect a few years ago, and proposed that Erie's distinctiveness is the result of historical settlement patterns. Unlike other cities with the Northern Cities Vowel Shift, Erie was settled by immigrants from the Midland/Mid-Atlantic rather than the North (namely, Scots-Irish).
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Old 01-08-2013, 07:57 PM
 
Location: New Hampshire
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
I wonder which other accents have noticeable generation gaps. Older White residents of DC will drop their R's (as DC used to be more Southern linguistically).
Here in eastern New England, many of the traditional dialect features have been lost across recent generations. At this link you can compare a 94-year-old New Hampshire woman's speech to that of a 16-year-old girl.
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Old 01-08-2013, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Verseau View Post
A UPenn PhD student wrote his dissertation on the Erie dialect a few years ago, and proposed that Erie's distinctiveness is the result of historical settlement patterns. Unlike other cities with the Northern Cities Vowel Shift, Erie was settled by immigrants from the Midland/Mid-Atlantic rather than the North (namely, Scots-Irish).
That's what I was suspecting. But I'm still interesting how it reached Chicago, but skipped Erie.
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Old 01-08-2013, 09:03 PM
 
Location: New Hampshire
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
That's what I was suspecting. But I'm still interesting how it reached Chicago, but skipped Erie.
I think the remainder of those Great Lakes cities were primarily settled by people continuing westward from Upstate New York. The Erie dialect was already well-established via the large Scots-Irish settlement, so people settling in or passing through Erie on their way westward from NY would have had little impact on the fundamental speech system there. Cleveland, Detroit, Chicago, and Milwaukee were still blank slates.
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Old 01-08-2013, 09:11 PM
 
Location: south central
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
I'm a fan of this map, because of all the details:

American English Dialects
This map is wicked cool. I'm not surprised that Fall River is under the Providence accent area, but I still don't understand it in some ways. I guess there are aspects of the Providence/Rhode Island accent that are New Yorkish and Northern, but I always thought it was more of a Boston accent-relative, especially being near Worcester and Fall River, the two cities that perhaps have the thickest Boston accents in the world, Lowell too.

Also...Hawaiian Standard English and Hawaiian Creole derive from Eastern New England dialect...AKA Boston accent??! Wow! Cool! I'll have to look into that.
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