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Old 01-08-2013, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Salem, Oregon
108 posts, read 247,024 times
Reputation: 35

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Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
Look at a map of Northern Maine up around the crown and you will see that it is as sparsely populated as many remote parts of the West. Most of it is undeveloped forests and lakes and unincorporated land, some used for timber cutting. There are also many parts of Vermont and Upstate New York that are very rural. A huge swath of the most northern part of New York is conservation land that's bigger than Rhode Island called Adirondack Park. There is plenty of open space if that's what you are looking for, you just have to get off the I-95 corridor.
Okay, I will. Thank you, for the suggestion. It kinda was what I was looking for, I just wanted to know if there was still room in the Northeast for people. Because I've never been over there, and I want too but don't know if there is enough apartments/homes for people. With so many people wanting to live or do live there.
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Old 01-08-2013, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Salem, Oregon
108 posts, read 247,024 times
Reputation: 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Austinite101 View Post
It will be too crowded when 200-story highrise residential buildings line every block from DC to Boston. Even then, I'd love to live there.
That's a good point, and so do I one day. But I don't know when that one day will be. So my question is mainly about is there enough apartments/homes for people.
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Old 01-08-2013, 08:46 AM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,422 posts, read 18,316,727 times
Reputation: 11902
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hikari616 View Post
That's a good point, and so do I one day. But I don't know when that one day will be. So my question is mainly about is there enough apartments/homes for people.
There are certainly enough apartments and housing to go around. This isn't China where they are constructing several square blocks of crowded highrises in frontier cities to offset the population of their most crowded cities. The biggest differences on the East Coast are it's a much diffferent and older housing stock than you're probably use to seeing and a lot more multi family housing. It's quite expensive but jobs tend to pay pretty well in places like Boston so it's all relative.

Here is an example of quintesential Boston area urban housing. A 2 BR flat in a triple decker will run an average ball park of somewhere between $1100 and $1700 a month depending on what neighborhood you want to live in.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/rob-bellinger/5361481673/

Last edited by Desert_SW_77; 01-08-2013 at 09:03 AM..
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Old 01-08-2013, 08:55 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,219 posts, read 19,521,254 times
Reputation: 12961
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hikari616 View Post
So you think there is enough homes and apartments for people who want to move there now and for the next generation? In the northeastern parts of the country, like New York, Washington, DC, Boston.
There are definitely enough homes and apartments, and very nice ones if you can afford them. These are 3 of the richest cities in America. The only thing you have to worry about is cost of living.
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Old 01-08-2013, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Salem, Oregon
108 posts, read 247,024 times
Reputation: 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
There are certainly enough apartments and housing to go around. This isn't China where they are constructing several square blocks of crowded highrises in frontier cities to offset the population of their most crowded cities. The biggest differences on the East Coast are it's a much diffferent and older housing stock than you're probably use to seeing and a lot more multi family housing. It's quite expensive but jobs tend to pay pretty well in places like Boston so it's all relative.

Here is an example of quintesential Boston area urban housing. A 2 BR flat in a triple decker will run an average ball park of somewhere between $1100 and $1700 a month depending on what neighborhood you want to live in.
Somerville Sunset, Somerville, Mass. | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
Your right, no its not China. They do pay well in places like Boston, so the cost of living there can even out. I know my question is kinda stupid but thank you again for answering. Thank you, for the picture. Those are kinda pretty, and the price isn't that bad for them.
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Old 01-08-2013, 09:53 AM
PDF
 
11,386 posts, read 10,510,871 times
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I think if anything, it's not crowded enough. Still plenty of room for development. Now to someone coming from another part of the country, it might seem like that.

It is dense, but there is still plenty of housing available.
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Old 01-08-2013, 10:00 AM
 
5,265 posts, read 14,899,381 times
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Take a look at Hong Kong, Tokyo, and basically the whole eastern third of China....the Northeast Coast will look like wide open frontier range in comparison (outside Manhattan and downtown Boston/Philly/DC of course)
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Old 01-08-2013, 10:55 AM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,422 posts, read 18,316,727 times
Reputation: 11902
Quote:
Originally Posted by PDF View Post
I think if anything, it's not crowded enough. Still plenty of room for development. Now to someone coming from another part of the country, it might seem like that.

It is dense, but there is still plenty of housing available.
I-95 is certainly crowded enough, as are the Bos-Wash cities. I'd rather not have Chinese style density in this country, no thank you. Boston/NY/Philly/DC don't need Japanese capsule bed hotels due to lack of space, that would suck.
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Old 01-08-2013, 11:05 AM
 
Location: In the heights
22,114 posts, read 23,627,108 times
Reputation: 11606
Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
I-95 is certainly crowded enough, as are the Bos-Wash cities. I'd rather not have Chinese style density in this country, no thank you. Boston/NY/Philly/DC don't need Japanese capsule bed hotels due to lack of space, that would suck.
East Asian density isn't so bad and it's really just the handful of massive cities that have things like capsule hotels (such as Tokyo). The one thing I like about that kind of density as opposed to suburban sprawl is that it ends up keeping a lot of farmland and nature intact (the latter more Japan than China). I actually think it's the far preferable development as even that still allows for many small towns that aren't sprawling estates, but are still pretty spacious with quick access to the big city and wonderful vibrant communities (sort of like New England towns and small cities with farmland and woodlands surrounding them instead of suburban tract developments).
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Old 01-08-2013, 01:25 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,422 posts, read 18,316,727 times
Reputation: 11902
Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
East Asian density isn't so bad and it's really just the handful of massive cities that have things like capsule hotels (such as Tokyo). The one thing I like about that kind of density as opposed to suburban sprawl is that it ends up keeping a lot of farmland and nature intact (the latter more Japan than China). I actually think it's the far preferable development as even that still allows for many small towns that aren't sprawling estates, but are still pretty spacious with quick access to the big city and wonderful vibrant communities (sort of like New England towns and small cities with farmland and woodlands surrounding them instead of suburban tract developments).
I think Europe strikes a nearly perfect balance between urban density and rural farmland, though New England is indeed pretty nice in that respect.
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