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Old 01-08-2013, 07:01 AM
 
Location: now nyc
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*OR RURAL..

Any places like this? Where rich, poor, middle classes live side by side (and when i mean side by side, i mean it; not just a poor section over 'there' and then a poor section over 'here' and then a middle class section 'down there')

I know there are cities like this since housing projects still exist but what about suburban areas? I know new suburbs would almost never be planned like that; but any suburbs like that anywhere?
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Old 01-08-2013, 08:17 AM
 
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Pennsauken, NJ has a big mix of HUD homes and middle class mixed together.
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Old 01-08-2013, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
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Shaker Heights, OH (suburb of Cleveland) has to be fairly close to like that. It's generally segregated by two light rail lines and big streets, but pretty much side-by-side for a suburb -- upper-middle class to borderline rich, and lower-middle class to borderline poor. It was a Master Planned community that I believe is 100 years old now.
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Old 01-08-2013, 11:50 AM
 
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When I was working for the Census Bureau, I was surprised to find out how many homes in some affluent suburban areas in western Ohio were actually section 8 houses. It is actually not that difficult to find places where there is one property with a lot of junked cars on it surrounded by expensive houses with married couples where both are doctors or other high-earning professionals.
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Old 01-08-2013, 01:55 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dxdtdemon View Post
When I was working for the Census Bureau, I was surprised to find out how many homes in some affluent suburban areas in western Ohio were actually section 8 houses. It is actually not that difficult to find places where there is one property with a lot of junked cars on it surrounded by expensive houses with married couples where both are doctors or other high-earning professionals.
Or you can find apartment complexes that accept some Section 8 in suburbs that are largely middle class. There are a couple of areas like this where I live
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Old 01-08-2013, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
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Hawthorne and Long Beach, CA leap to mind.
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Old 01-08-2013, 08:32 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justme02 View Post
Hawthorne and Long Beach, CA leap to mind.
I agree with Long Beach as mixed, but it's not really suburban. Its densities are generally those of a secondary city rather than a suburb.
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Old 01-08-2013, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Atlanta & NYC
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Sarasota, FL. Neighboring streets can be completely different worlds.
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Old 01-08-2013, 08:43 PM
 
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Even tony Greenwich, CT has housing projects. People from all over the country apply for these projects, and they have multi-year long waiting lists.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/26/ny...anted=all&_r=0
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Old 01-08-2013, 11:51 PM
 
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In some parts of Fairfield County, CT, you have housing projects just down the block from multi-million dollar houses on Long Island Sound. It always blew my mind how one section of a block could be so poor and how the other is filthy rich.
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