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Old 01-17-2013, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Baltimore / Montgomery County, MD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by surfer778 View Post
Not Texas (Texans have their own independent culture that has Southern influences, but is indeed distinctively Texan), Not Florida (save Panhandle), Not Atlanta metropolitan area, and Not Virginia (as of 2012), Not Louisiana (own distinct Creole and Cajun culture, again, with Southern influences but its own distinct culture that is independent from the South. And they are also too French, too Catholic to be aligned with Southern Culture).

Everywhere else is important to Southern Culture.
Virginia and Georgia (including ATL) still feel southern....
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Old 01-17-2013, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
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Historically I would say South Carolina and Virginia were the most important.

Both of those states were economically powerful during the colonial and antebellum periods and had large plantations (largely tobacco in Virginia and cotton and rice in South Carolina). Virginia produced a ton of national leaders (eight presidents, plus Robert E Lee). I believe Charleston was the first large city in the South and it was an important trade area. Richmond, Alexandria, and Petersburg were fairly important Southern cities. And of course the Civil War started in SC and the Capital of the Confederacy was in Richmond for most of the War (started in Montgomery). New Orleans was a very important city in the decades leading up to the Civil War, but on the whole I think the power of Louisiana didn't match that of Virginia or SC.

If you consider Texas and Florida southern those are the most important southern states these days, followed by Georgia, Virginia, and North Carolina. GA, VA, and NC are the economic leaders of the New South and cities like Atlanta, Charlotte, Raleigh, and Northern Virginia pretty powerful. Those three states have generally better university systems than the other southern states (most of the top universities in the south are in one of those states: Duke, UVA, UNC, Georgia Tech, William and Mary, Washington and Lee, Va. Tech, UGA...prob the most important one in another state is Vandy in Tenn.

Several states have become more involved in manufacturing (esp car manufacturing) in recent decades and there are large factories in several southern states.

Musically and culturally I think you have to go with Nashville (country music), Memphis (rock and country music), New Orleans (jazz) and Atlanta (R&B and hip-hop). Atlanta is clearly a cultural center in the south. Louisiana has unique culture and food. Activities such as hunting and fishing are popular throughout the south and I don't think one place is more "important" or "influential" than any other. Religion is very important in the south, but again there are churches everywhere, so I'm not sure one place influences another too much, although I believe many churches are based in Nashville.

For athletics, college football is king in the South. Alabama probably has the most influence with both U of Alabama and Auburn, but several other southern states also have powerful programs (Georgia, LSU, Florida, Tenn). Baseball is the second most popular sport and the Atlanta Braves are the de facto team of the south with many fans in Georgia, the Carolinas and Alabama, and a lesser concentration in the surrounding states. North Carolina is associated with NASCAR.
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Old 01-17-2013, 11:41 AM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
Yes, Texas is South by Southwest. It's BOTH.
I'm unfamiliar with this southwestern Texas. Where is it?
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Old 01-17-2013, 11:48 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
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^
West of the Pecos
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Old 01-17-2013, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
Atlanta is only a VERY small piece of Georgia. Most of Georgia is no different from SC or AL.

As for Florida, anywhere north of Gainesville is certainly the South.
Atlanta is a region as large as South Florida.It may not be as ethnically diverse,the culture of the area ais quite different from most of the rest of GA.Its 1/3 of the state.Its influence goes beyond its borders

While there is similarity found in all Southern states ,but Atlanta contributes a culture that is different from the rest of the state and the at least the Southeast.
Also the Appalachian Mountains contributes his own culture which is found in other states but very little int South Carolina and a couple of others.North Georgia has a different feel.TN and N.C. share it also.Alabama has some of it as well.

GA and SC are more similar than AL.I suppose because of their shared Colonial past.GA and SC were the wealthiest southern states before 1860.Alabama was not one of the wealthiest.Cotton played more of a roll than in AL.

It's subjective but I think anywhere from Tampa is South.
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Old 01-17-2013, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
Atlanta is a region as large as South Florida.It may not be as ethnically diverse,the culture of the area ais quite different from most of the rest of GA.Its 1/3 of the state.Its influence goes beyond its borders
While that's true, wouldn't you say there's a definite distinction between inside the perimeter and otp?
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Old 01-17-2013, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
While that's true, wouldn't you say there's a definite distinction between inside the perimeter and otp?
Well yes in some ways.Especially the further North you go.However there are 30 counties in the metro area.Its either one of the largest or the largest metropolitan area in North America.The Northern suburbas like Forsyth County (very far from the Perimeter)is one of the wealthiest in the U.S.That.There are many transplants in that area and all across the entire metropolitan area.Still conservative but more like a wealthy suburb you find everywhere.
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Old 01-17-2013, 06:25 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
I'm unfamiliar with this southwestern Texas. Where is it?
El Paso/Trans-Pecos. They're still apart of Texas. And they're still apart of the Southwest. Therefore, Texas is part of both regions.
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Old 01-17-2013, 07:35 PM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,113,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JJG View Post
Personally, I'd say it's more half and half with everything east of I-35 being more related to the souththern U.S. and everything west of it relating to Mexican/S.W. influence.

Still, I just can't lump Texas in with more than one other state, let alone the entire south. Only Alaska and Cali are the only other states that can say that.
LOL This debate/discussion comes up with us regularly, doesn't it JJG!

West Texas (sans the trans-pecos), was overwhelmingly settled by pioneers from the southeast. That was the clearly major influence on its culture. If anything, it is "Southwestern" in the original application of the term. That is, "western South." Where the essentials of Southern speech, religion, history, etc, are blended with characteristics of the post-bellum frontier West. In the same vein as Kansas was a product of the eastern Midwest blended with the post-bellum frontier West.

New Mexico and Arizona (which did not even become states until the early 20th Century) played little if any role in the historical and cultural development of Texas. Is the influence of Mexico and such increasing? Due to our lax immigration policies, of course. But that doesn't translate into such being a main force in shaping the character of the state. And that could change at any time. Here is a good passage from Raymond Gastil's classic work "Cultural Regions of the United States", which deliniated the clear difference in the Southwest of most of Texas and the mostly unrelated Southwest of NM and AZ.

Unlike the Interior Southwest, neither aboriginal Indian nor Spanish-American culture played a central role in the definition of the area. The people of Texas are mostly from the Lower, Upper, and Mountain South and these Southerners easily outnumbered the Spanish speaking and Indian people even before the state joined the Union. Therefore, when we refer to a large Spanish-speaking population in Texas, we are primarily speaking of a relatively recent immigrant population, quite different from the core areas of the Interior Southwest."

This whole "I-35" thing has been so oft-repeated it is almost accepted by default and -- no offense intended -- seems to have little thinking nor historical context put into it. It stems from the old slogan of Ft. Worth, "Where the West Begins."

The thing is, this was NEVER intended to mean "The South Stops Here.". Anymore than St. Louis' "Gateway to the West" arch, was intended to mean that the Midwest had ended. No, on the contrary, it meant where the EAST ended. And that, in fact, was why the response of Dallas was: "Where the East ends".

There is a huge difference.
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Old 01-17-2013, 07:36 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
^
West of the Pecos
Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
El Paso/Trans-Pecos. They're still apart of Texas. And they're still apart of the Southwest. Therefore, Texas is part of both regions.
I know. I'm just messing around.
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