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View Poll Results: Which non-Confederate state is the most Southern?
Oklahoma 63 23.33%
Kentucky 163 60.37%
West Virginia 44 16.30%
Voters: 270. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-23-2013, 04:33 PM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
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Kind of depends on what you mean by "Confederate". Lexington KY was very pro Confederate while Knoxville TN - 160 miles to the South - was very pro Union during the war.

Are you talking about places in 2013 where you're most like to see a souped up pickup truck with huge rims, smoke stack tail pipes, and a Confederate Flag window tint in the rear?
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Old 05-25-2013, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma City
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Oklahoma was aligned with the confederacy. It was a confederate Territory complete with confederate outposts. All five tribes of OK fought for the Confederacy. There are still old plantations located in Oklahoma. It only lacked statehood. Kentucky did not want to be part of the Confederacy.

The correct answer is Oklahoma.
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Old 05-25-2013, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma City
374 posts, read 643,988 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
Oklahoma wasn't Confederate controlled in its entirety. Some of the state sided with the Union. It was basically a lawless territory at that point. Arizona and New Mexico, both territories, were also claimed by the Confederacy even though they weren't officially a part of it. Everybody can agree those states, unlike Oklahoma, have very little, if any Southern influence.
Not true. No portion of Oklahoma was ever Union territory. There were small bands of Cherokees that broke off and sided with the Union towards the end of the war. The last Confederate General surrendered in Oklahoma by invading union soldiers.
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Old 05-26-2013, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnspecial View Post
Oklahoma was aligned with the confederacy. It was a confederate Territory complete with confederate outposts. All five tribes of OK fought for the Confederacy. There are still old plantations located in Oklahoma. It only lacked statehood. Kentucky did not want to be part of the Confederacy.

The correct answer is Oklahoma.
You are right. OK would have been a confederate state had it been a state at the time of the civil war. The culture in Oklahoma, especially in the OKC area, is very much akin to the deep South. In fact, due to the lack of transplants to dilute the culture, OKC may be one of the most genuine Southern cities.
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Old 05-27-2013, 09:58 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
You are right. OK would have been a confederate state had it been a state at the time of the civil war. The culture in Oklahoma, especially in the OKC area, is very much akin to the deep South. In fact, due to the lack of transplants to dilute the culture, OKC may be one of the most genuine Southern cities.
Maybe a tad bit of an overstatement, but Oklahoma is undeniably a culturally Southern state.

And, as you allude to, the fact that there is less transplantation here in OK City and I would add Tulsa too (say vs. somewhere like Hotlanta) the Southernness is not as diluted as in other big Southern cities.

Also, you are a correct in your assessment that Oklahoma would undoubtedly have been a Confederate state had it attained statehood during the Civil War as it was aligned with the Confederacy even while still Oklahoma Territory.
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Old 05-28-2013, 09:32 AM
 
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kentucky is very southern
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Old 06-01-2013, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma City
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I get sooooo tired of the media referring to Oklahoma as the Midwest. It's like fingernails on chalkboard. Even the AP Stylebook classifies Oklahoma as a southern state.
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Old 06-01-2013, 03:09 PM
 
29,949 posts, read 27,432,479 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
You are right. OK would have been a confederate state had it been a state at the time of the civil war. The culture in Oklahoma, especially in the OKC area, is very much akin to the deep South. In fact, due to the lack of transplants to dilute the culture, OKC may be one of the most genuine Southern cities.
The DEEP South? I think that's a bit excessive. Geographically, it's a bit too northern and western to be deep Southern and lacks the classic characteristics of the region, like a large Black rural population, location within the coastal plain, etc.
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Old 06-01-2013, 03:16 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
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Originally Posted by johnspecial View Post
I get sooooo tired of the media referring to Oklahoma as the Midwest. It's like fingernails on chalkboard. Even the AP Stylebook classifies Oklahoma as a southern state.
It's usually has to do with the weather. And, when the weather pattern covers a large swath of the middle of the country, many times the media will refer to the area under consideration as the Midwest. For example, along with Oklahoma, other Southern states are lumped into the Midwest. I have heard Texas, Arkansas, Tennessee, and even as far south and east as Mississippi referred to as the "Midwest" when it comes to weather prognostication.

I think it would be a lot more helpful if the media just used the Census Bureau's delineation of subregions within the overarching region. For instance, the media should refer to Oklahoma/Arkansas/Texas/Louisiana as the "West South Central." The next time a storm hits Oklahoma (wait 5 minutes!), the national periodicals as well as the TV media should write/say something like this: "Storm hovering over the West South Central, with severe weather moving from Texas to Oklahoma and Arkansas." This would go a long way in teaching basic geographical/cultural indicators of commonality between states in a particular subregion and their respective overarching region.

Clearly, many of the national weather prognosticators lack basic understanding of geographical/cultural affiliation within the United States. A simple standard like that employed by the Census Bureau's map would help in this regard (and teach the east/west coasters in the process!).
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Old 06-01-2013, 11:31 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,817,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bass&Catfish2008 View Post
It's usually has to do with the weather. And, when the weather pattern covers a large swath of the middle of the country, many times the media will refer to the area under consideration as the Midwest. For example, along with Oklahoma, other Southern states are lumped into the Midwest. I have heard Texas, Arkansas, Tennessee, and even as far south and east as Mississippi referred to as the "Midwest" when it comes to weather prognostication.

I think it would be a lot more helpful if the media just used the Census Bureau's delineation of subregions within the overarching region. For instance, the media should refer to Oklahoma/Arkansas/Texas/Louisiana as the "West South Central." The next time a storm hits Oklahoma (wait 5 minutes!), the national periodicals as well as the TV media should write/say something like this: "Storm hovering over the West South Central, with severe weather moving from Texas to Oklahoma and Arkansas." This would go a long way in teaching basic geographical/cultural indicators of commonality between states in a particular subregion and their respective overarching region.

Clearly, many of the national weather prognosticators lack basic understanding of geographical/cultural affiliation within the United States. A simple standard like that employed by the Census Bureau's map would help in this regard (and teach the east/west coasters in the process!).
I'm sure it has something to do with population figures, but the Census Bureau's classification is just way too complicated. I refer to those four states as the South Central US, and I think that's an adequate term.
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