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View Poll Results: Which non-Confederate state is the most Southern?
Oklahoma 63 23.33%
Kentucky 163 60.37%
West Virginia 44 16.30%
Voters: 270. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-12-2015, 07:47 AM
 
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HA! Sounds like Raleigh. I've heard people tell others "I can tell you're a native" around Raleigh.

How about Houston? Same neighborhood as Dallas? Also, have you ever visited NC? If so, any impressions?
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Old 04-12-2015, 11:32 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Bass&Catfish2008 View Post
I hear ya loud and clear, Spanky! You better tell Strong & the Boys they better pack a lunch for that whoopin' they're gonna get the second week of October!

.......And, I want all the world to see that there is actually one Longhorn fan (ahem....my braggadocio friend TexasReb) out there with a great sense of humor!

Bring that Steer on for dinner!
Keeping my sense of humor has been a little tough these last seasons, ol' buddy! LOL
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Old 04-12-2015, 11:46 AM
 
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=JayJayCB;39188746]HA! Sounds like Raleigh. I've heard people tell others "I can tell you're a native" around Raleigh.

How about Houston? Same neighborhood as Dallas? Also, have you ever visited NC? If so, any impressions?
I haven't been to Houston enough times to really make a good call on it. But from what I have heard, yeah, it is a lot like Dallas in that regard. Probably a little more of an Old South character about it.

And never been to North Carolina, although I have always wanted to visit. I heard it is a beautiful state. As a matter of historical trivia, I was reading a book a while called "Geography of Texas" which goes into a lot of aspects about the state (everything from settlement to linguistic patterns) and it mentioned that the accent thought of as "typically Texan" (i.e. that "twang spoken in rural west Texas) is very akin to that heard in eastern Tennessee and western North Carolina and far northern Alabama. Officially, it is known as "Mountain Southern."
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Old 04-12-2015, 04:51 PM
 
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I guess Texas was mainly settled by folks from North Carolina, Virginia, Tennessee, South Carolina, Kentucky, etc. I know that Alabama and Mississippi were both mainly settled by Carolina and Virginia folks, for sure. Tons of people from states like Virginia and Kentucky also settled in Midwestern states like Indiana and Iowa, but that's a different story.

Interesting regarding the accent, as there are many similarities between Eastern Tennessee and Western North Carolina so that makes sense. Definitely a "twang" as opposed to the drawls you'll hear in other areas like Eastern North Carolina or the majority of South Carolina and Georgia.
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Old 04-12-2015, 08:04 PM
 
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=JayJayCB;39194377]I guess Texas was mainly settled by folks from North Carolina, Virginia, Tennessee, South Carolina, Kentucky, etc. I know that Alabama and Mississippi were both mainly settled by Carolina and Virginia folks, for sure. Tons of people from states like Virginia and Kentucky also settled in Midwestern states like Indiana and Iowa, but that's a different story.

Interesting regarding the accent, as there are many similarities between Eastern Tennessee and Western North Carolina so that makes sense. Definitely a "twang" as opposed to the drawls you'll hear in other areas like Eastern North Carolina or the majority of South Carolina and Georgia.
Without going back and looking, if I recall correctly, Tennessee furnished the largest number of settlers to early Texas, with Alabama a close second. Then Mississippi and Georgia. North Carolina and Kentucky right up there. Then South Carolina and Arkansas, and Louisiana. They were all in the ballpark.

Have you ever been to Texas, just out of curiosity? It is an interesting combination of the South and West...with no contradictions between the two. Of course, just IMHO, that it why I always say there is no contradiction between the two designations. Make sense?
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Old 04-12-2015, 08:38 PM
 
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Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
Without going back and looking, if I recall correctly, Tennessee furnished the largest number of settlers to early Texas, with Alabama a close second. Then Mississippi and Georgia. North Carolina and Kentucky right up there. Then South Carolina and Arkansas, and Louisiana. They were all in the ballpark.

Have you ever been to Texas, just out of curiosity? It is an interesting combination of the South and West...with no contradictions between the two. Of course, just IMHO, that it why I always say there is no contradiction between the two designations. Make sense?
My Mom grew up in Ft. Worth, despite moving to North Carolina around the age of 15 along with being born in Oklahoma of parents from southern Missouri and Iowa (I was born in Raleigh, though. My Dad's side is North Carolinian). But yes, I've been to Texas but only once, stayed for about four days. The Dallas/Ft. Worth area, along with San Antonio and Austin. It felt very different from the South I know, since I'm so used to North Carolina, Virginia, South Carolina, Georgia, etc. However, I'm not going to argue against the fact that it's in the South. Just like you said, an interesting combination of the South and West. I think I preferred Austin out of all the places I visited, although I only spent an afternoon there. Still, visited the capitol building which was super cool. San Antonio felt like a different country, very interesting city. Visited the Alamo! Dallas/Ft. Worth felt a little too suburban and vanilla for my personal taste, but I loved the Ft. Worth stockyards. Also, I visited a few rural areas and small towns outside San Antonio and Austin. Still haven't visited Houston, or East Texas. However, very interesting state! Definitely come visit North Carolina if you ever get a chance, along with others in our neck of the woods like Virginia, South Carolina, Georgia, and Tennessee.

If you don't mind me asking, what part of Texas are you from?

Last edited by JayJayCB; 04-12-2015 at 08:46 PM..
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Old 04-12-2015, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Nashville TN
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Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
My Mom grew up in Ft. Worth, despite moving to North Carolina around the age of 15 along with being born in Oklahoma of parents from southern Missouri and Iowa (I was born in Raleigh, though. My Dad's side is North Carolinian). But yes, I've been to Texas but only once, stayed for about four days. The Dallas/Ft. Worth area, along with San Antonio and Austin. It felt very different from the South I know, since I'm so used to North Carolina, Virginia, South Carolina, Georgia, etc. However, I'm not going to argue against the fact that it's in the South. Just like you said, an interesting combination of the South and West. I think I preferred Austin out of all the places I visited, although I only spent an afternoon there. Still, visited the capitol building which was super cool. San Antonio felt like a different country, very interesting city. Visited the Alamo! Dallas/Ft. Worth felt a little too suburban and vanilla for my personal taste, but I loved the Ft. Worth stockyards. Also, I visited a few rural areas and small towns outside San Antonio and Austin. Still haven't visited Houston, or East Texas. However, very interesting state! Definitely come visit North Carolina if you ever get a chance, along with others in our neck of the woods like Virginia, South Carolina, Georgia, and Tennessee.
I agree with you my gf's family is from Texas, I love Texas but it doesn't really feel like the South to me. Texas is way more diverse in culture than most of the South, plus they have their own history being they used to be part of Mexico. Texas does have some elements of Southern culture like a lot of big churches, hunting and fishing is big, big pro gun culture, lot of pride in America, upper class women who dress up and look pretty lol but it has its own unique Western Cowboy culture that the South doesn't have except for East Texas.
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Old 04-12-2015, 09:10 PM
 
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I think this is an interesting video, discussing dialects in Kentucky, Ohio, and Texas. Just thought I'd share, but it's interesting how the Texan in this video seems to refer to Texans as "westerners" although maybe he's just talking about West Texas?

https://youtu.be/FiNsyXHBZak
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Old 04-13-2015, 03:52 AM
 
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Quote:
=JayJayCB;39197067]I think this is an interesting video, discussing dialects in Kentucky, Ohio, and Texas. Just thought I'd share, but it's interesting how the Texan in this video seems to refer to Texans as "westerners" although maybe he's just talking about West Texas?

https://youtu.be/FiNsyXHBZak
Good video!

Texas is western, no question. But my point has always been it is not western in the same sense as, say, Colorado or Arizona are. Instead, western like Kansas is both Midwestern and Western, or South Carolina is both Southern and Eastern.

Although it is not widely known or even considered, the prototype of the Texas cowboy was the Old South cattle drover. Most of those early Texas cowboys and ranchers were former Confederate soldiers who had moved west to get a new start. A lot of that image of Texas came from the old Hollywood westerns (which were actually filmed in southern Arizona and California), which imparted that image of the state being one large expanse of desert, tumbleweed and cactus. LOL

And it was cotton that was king in Texas, not cattle and ranching...even though they get top billing. John Wayne didn't hurt matters any! LOL

After the War Between the States, Texas had an advantage (of sorts) over the other Confederate States as it was mostly still an unsettled frontier, and politicians and business concerns tried to "repackage" it as a western rather than Southern state. Partly because there was that "romantic image" of the cowboy and all, and it lent a lot of tourist travel to the state. Since the 1980's though, there has been an effort in Texas geography and history books to "bring back" the "Southern legacy" of the state into the narrative...something that has been long overdue. It was not Wyoming or Utah that influenced the essential formation of Texas, but Tennessee and Alabama (among other southeastern states).

Just as a note aside, that particular map uses a lot of Hispanic terms to slang to "divide" their boundaries; not the actual dialect. This one, I think, is a better and more detailed one:

American English Dialects

Last edited by TexasReb; 04-13-2015 at 04:23 AM..
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Old 04-13-2015, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
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I've never been to OK, but WV feels much more isolated and hillbilly overall than Southern. There are Southern elements to it, but it feels like it's own little world.

Most of Kentucky is undeniably Southern.
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